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The benefits of bright clothing

Re: The benefits of bright clothing

Postby Tinto63 » Thu May 06, 2021 6:02 pm

I do find that my all black gear stands out a little too much in snow conditions and have purchased an ex-marines off-white arctic warfare smock to wear, so I that will blend into the next whiteout I encounter :lol:

On a slightly more serious note, it doesn't really make much difference what colour gear you wear in really poor visibility.

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Pentland Hills, January 2021
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Re: The benefits of bright clothing

Postby Border Reiver » Fri May 07, 2021 5:09 pm

I have clothing in red, blue, green, grey, brown, black and khaki and it's chosen on quality, usefulness and value for money, not because of the colours. My cold / wet weather jackets are red and blue, but my summer stuff tends to be grey, green and khaki. My tent is green. To be honest I think wildlife tends to notice noise or movement more than colour.
I've been reading one of Hamish Brown's books and he seems to prefer colours that do not clash with the surroundings. He writes when commenting on dayglo clothing and tents "can we please treat the gentle colours of the wild with some corresponding gentleness?" If I was in trouble and needed to be seen, I always carry my bright orange bivvy bag. That's why they are orange in colour, to be seen.
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Re: The benefits of bright clothing

Postby rabthecairnterrier » Sat May 08, 2021 12:15 am

Border Reiver wrote:I've been reading one of Hamish Brown's books and he seems to prefer colours that do not clash with the surroundings. He writes when commenting on dayglo clothing and tents "can we please treat the gentle colours of the wild with some corresponding gentleness?"


One thing I dislike - and will no longer tolerate for myself - is the use of vivid colours for items such as tent and waterproofs. This has lingered due to a fallacious desire for 'safety', an argument that would apply only to solo travelers, if valid; yet we still see endless queues of belisha beacon bodies marching over the fells. Most solo walkers would carry a bright orange bivi bag (or something) which could attract the eye in an emergency. So, have mercy on the wilderness! Boycott bright colours.
- Hamish's Groat's End Walk, 1981
Going further back W A Poucher solemnly advised his readers to wear bright red socks with their knee breeches so as to be visible in case of accident, but then who wear breeches these days! There's always gaiters of course, but good luck finding a pair in anything other than black.
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Re: The benefits of bright clothing

Postby Caberfeidh » Sat May 08, 2021 4:40 am

At certain times of year the colours of the moorland foliage make even orange, red and yellow clothing become some kind of camouflage. For truly gruesome colours and designs, watch some 1980s video footage of hikers and climbers; random arrangements of yellow and purple shapes made waterproof jackets a ghastly sight. :shock:
Autumnal pics 001#a.jpg

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Re: The benefits of bright clothing

Postby CharlesT » Sat May 08, 2021 10:32 am

rabthecairnterrier wrote:
Border Reiver wrote:Going further back W A Poucher solemnly advised his readers to wear bright red socks with their knee breeches so as to be visible in case of accident, but then who wear breeches these days! There's always gaiters of course, but good luck finding a pair in anything other than black.

I had a pair of climbing breeks in my early rock days, they were quite the thing then, but I didn't wear red socks.
The great WA Poucher was a noted and respected Perfumier besides an unsurpassed mountain photographer. It was not unknown for him to take to the hills wearing some of his products, notably eyeshadow, mascara and cologne. Would certainly be an improvement on the presentation and odour of some individuals I have come across from time to time. 😄
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Re: The benefits of bright clothing

Postby Sunset tripper » Sat May 08, 2021 11:35 am

Caberfeidh wrote:At certain times of year the colours of the moorland foliage make even orange, red and yellow clothing become some kind of camouflage. For truly gruesome colours and designs, watch some 1980s video footage of hikers and climbers; random arrangements of yellow and purple shapes made waterproof jackets a ghastly sight. :shock:
Autumnal pics 001#a.jpg



Is that the falls at Drum?
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Re: The benefits of bright clothing

Postby Booga » Sat May 22, 2021 4:11 pm

rabthecairnterrier wrote:Going further back W A Poucher solemnly advised his readers to wear bright red socks with their knee breeches so as to be visible in case of accident, but then who wear breeches these days! There's always gaiters of course, but good luck finding a pair in anything other than black.


I have some Trek Mates branded goretex gaiters in bright red, chosen deliberately because I realised most of my kit was black or green. I'm not sure if they are still available.
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