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Protection against out of control dogs

Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby Sgurr » Thu Jul 11, 2019 7:04 pm

Only Hill I have seen a cat on is Wapley Hill in England. It's summit is your-guess-is-as-good-as-mine on a Roman Camp. They also had a Jack Russell terrier. And yes, that is its lead going across its owner.

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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby JeanJean » Thu Jul 11, 2019 8:07 pm

In response to the post by nigheandonn:

I was quoting from the document 'Controlling your dog in public' on the GOV UK website which states:

"Your dog is considered dangerously out of control if it:
- injures someone
- makes someone worried that it might injure them"

It also states that "It’s against the law to let a dog be dangerously out of control anywhere"

Personally I think that, being bitten by a dog when a child, was a good reason for being nervous around unfamiliar dogs, and also a good reason why dogs should be on (short!) leads in public places.
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby rodderss » Sat Jul 13, 2019 10:08 am

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Morning.i can regularly be seen out on the hills and like to keep myself to myself when out walking .
I'm not really liking the vibe of this topic.

It's not us that are the problem but you humans.

I'm sick of big dogs charging over to me , it can be quite intimidating so can the human owners please keep them on the lead when I'm around .i don't want my bum sniffed and I certainly don't want to play .

I know you think your dogs the greatest, best dog in the world etc etc but not true.I am and if you don't believe me ask my dad and if he says it it must be FACT

Another thing keep on turding close to paths I love to eat it , my dad says eating human excrement is disgusting and isn't happy about it and says you should turd well away from paths and bury it but please keep it up .

Lastly don't call me cute, cuddly ,fluff ball or anything like that I'm 7 for gods sake, I prefer something more befitting like attractive or handsome
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby bydand_loon » Sat Jul 13, 2019 3:33 pm

Walking pole has a nice sharp point
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby rohan » Sat Jul 13, 2019 6:42 pm

After many bad experiences with dog owners ( the dogs don't know any better) I now carry dog biscuits. Doesn't always work but my local farm dogs (nippy collies who drew blood on one occasion) and look for eating the biscuits, not me.
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby StevieC » Mon Jul 15, 2019 2:50 pm

KatTai wrote:
WhitstableDave wrote:and in any case, I had a dog (on a lead) go for me as I passed ("Sorry, he's scared of anyone carrying a stick...").


I hate this from dog owners, one of my dogs was attacked by an off-lead dog while they were on a lead and their excuse was my dog was attacked because she was on a lead :? If their dog doesn't like other dogs on a lead/people carrying sticks/people wearing hats (another common one!) etc it is their responsibility to get their dog under control to avoid an incident not to "blame" the other party for having the audacity to have a dog on a lead, use a stick or wear a hat!


I'd literally never heard of the "people wearing hats" thing, but this happened to me yesterday on the summit of Carn a' Chlamain! A group of four with a lovely big hairy retriever asked me to take their pic, and when the dog came over for a sniff the owner was mortified and said it was because of my hat! :lol:

The dog was a big placid thing and wasn't doing anything to cause alarm, but the owner was very apologetic! I love meeting dogs out on the hills, but I understand that those with a phobia or a strong dislike, will feel differently. Short of making it against the law to let your dog off the lead in any public space I'm not sure there's a lot that can be done, other than some of the common-sense suggestions made above...
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby Avocetboy » Mon Jul 15, 2019 3:47 pm

rodderss wrote:Another thing keep on turding close to paths I love to eat it , my dad says eating human excrement is disgusting and isn't happy about it and says you should turd well away from paths and bury it but please keep it up .


Absolutely spot on Rodderss, Even better if them Humans leave a bit of toilet roll, so once I've got the scent its easier to spot.

And, Yes, my owner also thinks its disgusting. He cannot understand on what planet people live on, to think it is acceptable. What made it worse is that the last time I found one, an hour later I puked it up in my Bed...Nice!!!

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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby Lightfoot2017 » Mon Jul 15, 2019 4:55 pm

Isn't there the theory that if a dog clamps it's teeth into you and won't let go, one of the most effective ways to get it to do so is to insert a finger into its fundament? :shock:

I work with a guy who says car keys work equally well. :lol:

Personally I'd be tempted to give any unruly mutt the business end of my walking pole.
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby Marty_JG » Mon Jul 15, 2019 11:31 pm

JeanJean wrote:"Your dog is considered dangerously out of control if it:
- injures someone
- makes someone worried that it might injure them"

Personally I think that, being bitten by a dog when a child, was a good reason for being nervous around unfamiliar dogs, and also a good reason why dogs should be on (short!) leads in public places.


Not letting a dog roam is a terrible thing for its health, physical and mental. If a dog's actions are making a reasonable person worried it might injure them then yes, sure, it is out of control. If a dog is being reasonable and someone has a phobia or unaddressed childhood trauma and "automatically worries" about a dog, the problem is the person not a dog.

I don't mean that cruelly. People have all manner of sincere fears and phobias. They are dealt with by incremental exposure, not pandering. Wrapping someone in cotton-wool seems the compassionate thing to do, and perhaps it is in the moment, but it's a terrible long-term strategy for them.
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby bootsandpaddles » Tue Jul 16, 2019 7:41 am

This depends on your definition of reasonable. I am not afraid of dogs but I do not think that it is unreasonable to expect to go on a walk or a run without being approached by out of control dogs. Letting a dog run off its lead is one thing, allowing it to make a nuisance of itself around other people is another thing entirely. This post (Marty_JG) is just another example of a dog owner trying to put the blame on others. Train your dog to ignore other people unless they are welcoming the attention. It can be done but it does require an acceptance of the rights and needs of other people.
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby KatTai » Tue Jul 16, 2019 9:22 am

Marty_JG wrote:
Not letting a dog roam is a terrible thing for its health, physical and mental.


Not necessarily, some breed-specific rescues will state in their adoption contract the dog is not to be off-lead outside of a fully enclosed area. Fact of life with some dogs. I have one that can't be off-lead outside of a fully secured area, it is something that dog owners such as myself have to deal with and work around, not allow them to run free and become a nuisance regardless of the risks to themselves and others. It is only terrible for their physical and mental well-being if the owner allows that to be the case, there are alternatives. Allowing a dog off-lead is a privilege that comes with training to ensure a reliable recall and that the dog isn't going to be a problem for others, not something that should be seen as a given regardless.
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby rabthecairnterrier » Tue Jul 16, 2019 10:35 am

bootsandpaddles wrote:This depends on your definition of reasonable. I am not afraid of dogs but I do not think that it is unreasonable to expect to go on a walk or a run without being approached by out of control dogs. Letting a dog run off its lead is one thing, allowing it to make a nuisance of itself around other people is another thing entirely. This post (Marty_JG) is just another example of a dog owner trying to put the blame on others. Train your dog to ignore other people unless they are welcoming the attention. It can be done but it does require an acceptance of the rights and needs of other people.

Seconded.
I'd also add that dogs running free on the hill (and elsewhere) is generally bad news for wildlife in general, and ground nesting birds in particular.
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby rabthecairnterrier » Tue Jul 16, 2019 10:53 am

brpro26 wrote:Owning a dog seems to have become a fashion accessory. Maybe you should have to pass a dog control test before you can be let off the lead with one. :lol:

Any easy Munros for my cat...???

Not Munros but ...
Beinn a'Chait - subsidiary top of B Dearg N of Blair Atholl.
Hill of Cat on the border between Angus and Aberdeenshire.
... not sure if cats would enjoy hillwalking though. In fact, I'm pretty sure they wouldn't!
Mind you, in 1950 The Times carried a story about a cat from the Hotel Belvedere which followed a group of climbers up the Hornli Ridge to the summit of the Matterhorn, and was carried back down in a rucksack.
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby Fairweather Softie » Tue Jul 16, 2019 1:55 pm

Original post states,

"I have been walking in the hills and countryside of Scotland and England for over 40 years and have had little concern about out of control dogs.....until now"

Surely anyone would think that the risk of injury is minimum if you have had little concern for over 40 years.

I'm not a dog owner, I've yet to see a dangerous out of control dog on the hills, perhaps I'm just lucky. Time for euro millions tonight then.

For all you dog owners out there let me know what hills your walking on I'd be happy to take my chances.
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby Marty_JG » Tue Jul 16, 2019 2:45 pm

bootsandpaddles wrote:This post (Marty_JG) is just another example of a dog owner trying to put the blame on others.


That's a misrepresentation of what I said. I put blame for out-of-control dogs on the owners; but person who is terrified by all off-lead dogs, that blame is not on the dog.
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