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Protection against out of control dogs

Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby CharlesT » Thu Jul 18, 2019 4:05 pm

Marty_JG wrote:
CharlesT wrote:It's the dogmatism of the arguments that gets to me.


Are you suggesting they're barking up the wrong tree?


More like baying at the moon I suggest.
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby Marty_JG » Thu Jul 18, 2019 4:46 pm

At some level we're all Howlin' Mad Murdoch.

0504155[1].jpg
Say waaaat?
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby crfishwick » Thu Jul 18, 2019 11:31 pm

SummitStupid wrote:There are handheld ultrasonic devices designed to deter dogs, like this one

https://www.amazon.com/Zomma-Handheld-Repellent-Ultrasonic-Deterrent/dp/B07T2JMPVX/ref=zg_bs_3024229011_3?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=7JGHNAMKSTZTXQZX322V

I don't know how effective they are - the one I linked to is a training aid - but do some Googling or Amazoning and you might be able to find something for you.


Those contraptions "So called training aids" are bull :crazy: They need to be banned! Seems Amazon has already removed that link. :D

Don't you realise the original poster is trying to wind people up?
Last edited by crfishwick on Thu Jul 18, 2019 11:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby crfishwick » Thu Jul 18, 2019 11:33 pm

JeanJean wrote:Does anyone have advice on effective measures/gadgets to repel out of control dogs while out walking?

I have been walking in the hills and countryside of Scotland and England for over 40 years and have had little concern about out of control dogs.....until now. This year my husband has been knocked over twice by dogs running up to him and jumping up. On many occasions we have been approached by out of control dogs, running around with no owner in sight. When remonstrating with the owner, when they eventually show up, they are either abusive or just apologise and carry on.

I know it's only a small minority of dog owners and that most dog owners are responsible and keep their dogs under control. However some dog owners don't seem to realise that a dog is considered dangerously out of control if it "injures someone" or "makes someone worried that it might injure them". I don't dislike dogs but it is pretty scary when a large dog comes bounding up, barking, with no owner in sight. And the law isn't much good if you're in the middle of the Scottish Highlands, miles away from the nearest police station. For my own safety I feel it's time to invest in something to deter out of control dogs.


Get lost. troll
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby crfishwick » Thu Jul 18, 2019 11:35 pm

JeanJean wrote:In response to the post by nigheandonn:

I was quoting from the document 'Controlling your dog in public' on the GOV UK website which states:

"Your dog is considered dangerously out of control if it:
- injures someone
- makes someone worried that it might injure them"

It also states that "It’s against the law to let a dog be dangerously out of control anywhere"

Personally I think that, being bitten by a dog when a child, was a good reason for being nervous around unfamiliar dogs, and also a good reason why dogs should be on (short!) leads in public places.

YAWN. Trolling again! Get a life. :( :(
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby crfishwick » Thu Jul 18, 2019 11:46 pm

Ben Nachie wrote:
al78 wrote:
Ben Nachie wrote:I think the solution is to get a dog.

Why do I say that? Well, then you'll find out how hard it is to train a dog, and once it is trained, how hard it is to get it to remember that training and act consistently. Dogs are intelligent, living, breathing creatures just like us, and they have minds of their own, just like us. Some of them have stronger wills than others, just like us.



Hmm, I wonder if similar advice would work for those who complain about badly disciplined children, they should stop complaining and start a family, then they would realise how difficult it is to bring a child up.

"Dogs are intelligent", I question that. Like humans, their intelligence is vastly overrated. Like smart-phone-dumb-users, I question the intelligence of any sentient being that chooses to put itself in the most obstructive position for me because the edge of the visible universe has shrunk to a meter from their body, despite having a few hundred square meters of alternative space where we could avoid all path conflicts.
Seems there are some people who should avoid dogs.

And paths.

And other people.

LOL :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby Billbobaggins » Fri Jul 19, 2019 8:22 am

crfishwick wrote:
JeanJean wrote:Does anyone have advice on effective measures/gadgets to repel out of control dogs while out walking?

I have been walking in the hills and countryside of Scotland and England for over 40 years and have had little concern about out of control dogs.....until now. This year my husband has been knocked over twice by dogs running up to him and jumping up. On many occasions we have been approached by out of control dogs, running around with no owner in sight. When remonstrating with the owner, when they eventually show up, they are either abusive or just apologise and carry on.

I know it's only a small minority of dog owners and that most dog owners are responsible and keep their dogs under control. However some dog owners don't seem to realise that a dog is considered dangerously out of control if it "injures someone" or "makes someone worried that it might injure them". I don't dislike dogs but it is pretty scary when a large dog comes bounding up, barking, with no owner in sight. And the law isn't much good if you're in the middle of the Scottish Highlands, miles away from the nearest police station. For my own safety I feel it's time to invest in something to deter out of control dogs.


Get lost. troll


An amazingly well rounded and eloquent response :clap: :clap:
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby WhitstableDave » Fri Jul 19, 2019 9:51 am

crfishwick wrote:Get lost. troll


Oh dear.

Although I live in SE England, I've enjoyed several walking holidays in the Highlands and Islands and I've used this site to read reviews and find and download routes. I'm off to Harris and then north of Ullapool soon, and instead of only browsing this forum I decided to register and join in.

Living in Kent, the great majority of my walks are in woodland, across farmland and along the coast. Dogs can be a real issue for me, which is why I sympathised with the OP and why I contributed. Just because some people feel differently to you about some things does not make them trolls!
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby kmai1961 » Fri Jul 19, 2019 10:45 am

WhitstableDave wrote:
Oh dear.


Oh, dear, indeed. I've bitten my now nearly bleeding tongue on this thread until now. Thanks to everyone, both dog owners and not, who have provided thoughtful and measured comments and advice.

I’m not a dog person. I never have been, and I can’t imagine that I ever will be. There, I’ve said it, bring on the abuse. My reasons are many and varied, and I don’t feel the need to explain, defend, or justify them. You won’t change how I feel, so don’t insult my intelligence by posting cute photos in response, or by listing all the reasons you love your dog, and why I should too. You can’t “fix” me by exposing me to your dog.

I fully understand how people feel about their dogs, even though I don’t form the same connection, and I respect anyone’s decision to include dogs in their lives, both at home and in the hills. Can you say the same about me? Do you respect my decision to NOT be a dog person, and can you respect my wishes to enjoy my walk without being jumped on, drooled over or to have my leg humped, and to not have to take every step looking to see whether it’s going to be into dog mess? These are some of the more harmless unpleasantries—only those who have been attacked or bitten can truly appreciate the level of fear that can be caused by being approached by an unknown dog at a run.

As Sunset tripper said in an earlier post, this is a multifaceted issue and discussion, and clearly an emotive one. In my experience, many dog lovers incorrectly assume that everyone feels the same as they do. I respectfully suggest that your default assumption be, when approaching someone unknown, whether out in the hills or on a local cycle track, that he or she might not, in fact, be a dog person. Keep your dog(s) firmly under control, on a lead if necessary, until and unless the unknown person shows interest in making an acquaintance. (If you’re unable to control your dog, then that’s a whole ‘nother problem.)

For all the misbehaving dogs I’ve met in the hills, I have seen many more that are well-trained. Their owners graciously stand to one side with dogs firmly under control, allowing me to pass. Or the dogs return obediently to their owner’s side when called, and/or pay me no mind. For my part, I try to make allowances for doggy mischief that happens on occasion; they are animals after all. But there’s a huge difference between a heartfelt and mortified apology, and a casual “apology” of the “oh, sorry about that, but what am I gonna do, after all, he’s/she’s a dog” variety, without any accompanying acknowledgement of responsibility.

WhitstableDave wrote: Just because some people feel differently to you about some things does not make them trolls!


Agree, Dave, and a comment such as this lies far outwith the general spirit of helpfulness and friendliness (even during lively discussions) of this forum/community.
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby Fletcherswood » Fri Jul 19, 2019 11:52 am

We walk about 800 miles a year and often have dog problems. If a dog is particularly aggressive I take of my rucksack and hold it between me and the dog. Other than that I tend to go on the offensive towards the dog and they usually back off. A couple of years ago we were walking a path on a ridge and saw several hundred meters away below us a dog racing on a parallel path barking continuously. We eventually arrived at a farm where the dog came straight for us attacking our legs. With our rucksacks in front of us I started throwing clumps of earth at it ,advancing towards it all the time . After several minutes of this the dog ran up to some fencing where 12to 15 other dogs came up to it all barking in a frenzy. To my horror I could see that the other side of the compound was open and realised there was no way I could keep that many dogs off us . We absolutely raced away from there. Didn’t stop running for about a mile. All this on public footpaths.
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby malky_c » Fri Jul 19, 2019 4:05 pm

Dogs are OK I suppose. I prefer in a casserole rather than grilled, though. Would struggle to eat a whole one unless it was really small.
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby bootsandpaddles » Fri Jul 19, 2019 4:12 pm

Well said, kmai1961. I agree with everything you have said. It won't make any difference though, unfortunately.
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby CharlesT » Fri Jul 19, 2019 8:22 pm

malky_c wrote:Dogs are OK I suppose. I prefer in a casserole rather than grilled, though. Would struggle to eat a whole one unless it was really small.


Oo'err.....I'm off....

8743ea34-78be-4e66-a306-a24ac9b597c9_570.jpeg
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby Paul Webster » Sun Jul 21, 2019 8:50 pm

We've issued a warning regarding the posts about trolling. Please keep to topic and only make posts that respect other users. If you can't do this then please don't respond at all.
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Re: Protection against out of control dogs

Postby gammy leg walker » Sun Jul 21, 2019 9:14 pm

Paul Webster wrote:We've issued a warning regarding the posts about trolling. Please keep to topic and only make posts that respect other users. If you can't do this then please don't respond at all.

Hallelujah
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