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Penrith to Threlkeld, by way of some Elusive Fells

PostPosted: Wed Aug 12, 2020 9:37 pm
by Christo1979

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I'm a fan of coming up with long (perhaps idiosyncratic) walks, joining up hills that I have either missed on previous trips, or would perhaps be a little awkward for me to get to generally. It also makes me feel like I've 'had my money's worth' so to speak, given that it takes so long for me to get places on public transport :lol:

And so it was that I set off from Penrith with a plan to walk some of the High Street Roman road (or at least as near to it as you can in the 21st century) and then head off somewhere near High Raise and do a few of the Far Eastern Fells. I strode out of Penrith with a spring in my step, following footpaths through farm fields, the fells teasing me on the horizon. After a while, it became road walking, and I half planned to walk up to Celleron then up on towards 'The Cockpit' and on to the fells, some of which I had walked before. In fact, I got to Celleron then suddenly had a change of heart - why not drop down into Pooley Bridge, then walk some of the Ullswater Way? I could always hit the fells somewhere above Howtown.

And so that is how I found myself wandering, one early summer evening, along the path above Ullswater, happy as a pig in muck.

ImagePenrith to Threlkeld by Christopher Watson, on Flickr

ImagePenrith to Threlkeld by Christopher Watson, on Flickr

Once past Howtown, I entered Fusedale for the first time - and what a glorious valley! The good path took me gradually along Fusedale Beck and then gradually climbed, and climbed, and climbed, emerging on Wether Hill - hey presto, I was back on the Roman Road. The sun was getting lower in the sky, and up a height the temperature dropped substantially. My mind turned to a bed for the night, but not before bagging Kidsty Pike, Rampsgill Head, and the rather shapely Knott.

ImagePenrith to Threlkeld by Christopher Watson, on Flickr

ImagePenrith to Threlkeld by Christopher Watson, on Flickr

Descending The Knott, I found a lovely little flat area overlooking Rest Dodd, and caught sight of several deer. Tent up, perfect spot. Throughout the night the deer came close to the tent and made the most terrifying noises - who'd have thought Bambi would sound like something from a horror film? Very early the next morning I breakfasted in the rain then tackled Rest Dodd head-on, before dropping down towards Brock Crags, along by Angle Tarn, then somewhat awkwardly up to Angletarn Pikes and its list of summits :lol:

As a side note, I was delighted at my previous night's pitch high up on Knott, and counted no fewer than 17 tents dotted around Angle Tarn. I also counted no fewer than 6 bum cheeks going about their morning movements by the tarn, and found myself feeling a little angry at my fellow man. Or perhaps just bitter that I have braved all manner of uncomfortable conditions in the hills, attending to business far away from my tent, far from paths, digging little holes. At Angletarn-by-the-sea they were only a burger van away from being a resort. Anyway, onwards.

ImagePenrith to Threlkeld by Christopher Watson, on Flickr

ImagePenrith to Threlkeld by Christopher Watson, on Flickr

ImagePenrith to Threlkeld by Christopher Watson, on Flickr

ImagePenrith to Threlkeld by Christopher Watson, on Flickr

I say onwards, I came across another pair of cheeks at the Boredale Hause 'junction', tutted as the cheeks retreated through the tent flaps, then made my way down to Glenridding. Time to adjust myself, attend to aching feet, get rid of rubbish (in a bin, fancy that), before making my way up to the Greenside Road and along the busy path we all know so well.

ImagePenrith to Threlkeld by Christopher Watson, on Flickr

I stopped to watch the lines of people snake their way up towards Helvellyn, and then left the path to head up to my own private fells, up Stang End and through the interesting remnants of mining works, to make my way to Sheffield Pike. Back down to the path, and then steeply up Glencoyne Head, I was off across to the rather inconveniently situated Hart Side, when the mist suddenly rolled-in and the landscape looked more like it usually does when I'm in the hills :lol:

ImagePenrith to Threlkeld by Christopher Watson, on Flickr

ImagePenrith to Threlkeld by Christopher Watson, on Flickr

ImagePenrith to Threlkeld by Christopher Watson, on Flickr

Next on to the Dodds. The mist cleared every now and then to give me little glimpses of Thirlmere, and by the time I arrived at Watson's Dodd (an underrated fell in my humble opinion...) the conditions were excellent. I lingered at Watson's Dodd, and not just because of the name :lol:

ImagePenrith to Threlkeld by Christopher Watson, on Flickr

ImagePenrith to Threlkeld by Christopher Watson, on Flickr

The rest of the walk was straightforward, gentle walking - Great Dodd, Calfhow Pike, then straight up the (wet) side of Clough Head. This latter fell has teased me so many times when I've travelled by bus into Keswick, it felt great to have conquered it at long last. But it soon conquered me, because the steep descent down the screes made the ending to the walk rather more dramatic and telling on the knees than I would have liked. Great views, though.

And so I snaked my way down to Threlkeld, and had a pint while waiting for my bus, chuffed that I could now tick off a whole bunch of beautiful fells. Fells that have been teasing me for months. Cheers!

ImagePenrith to Threlkeld by Christopher Watson, on Flickr

ImagePenrith to Threlkeld by Christopher Watson, on Flickr