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Smidge

Smidge


Postby Charlie Chan » Fri Jul 23, 2021 4:39 pm

Take care not to get it on your lips, eyes or nose. The small print says it can induce nausea and vomiting. My wife got a tiny amount on her lips and ended up with both of the above.
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Re: Smidge

Postby SteveNorthumberland » Fri Jul 23, 2021 9:04 pm

I used it on the west highland way in June and it didn’t work for me
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Re: Smidge

Postby nathan79 » Fri Jul 23, 2021 10:56 pm

I've got it on my lips and consequently in my mouth many-a-time. Not a flavour I would choose to taste, but I've never lost my lunch yet.
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Re: Smidge

Postby Mal Grey » Sat Jul 24, 2021 10:02 am

I wouldn't want to have any repellent get into my system, and Smidge is one of the least nasty. However, I have got it on my lips before, with no problems, but best to be safe!


I used it on the west highland way in June and it didn’t work for me


Sometimes nothing works but for me Smidge is the best of the non-DEET repellents. I do think it stops bites more than stops midges coming to you. I also think you have to apply it more often than DEET, but it does do the job for me. Suspect its a personal thing.
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Re: Smidge

Postby iain_atkinson_1986 » Sat Jul 24, 2021 11:32 am

Never mind ingesting it, keep it out of your eyes. A combination of sweat, sun cream and Smidge in your eyes is an absolute killer!
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Re: Smidge

Postby AspiringHiker » Mon Jul 26, 2021 7:31 pm

Mal Grey wrote:Sometimes nothing works but for me Smidge is the best of the non-DEET repellents. I do think it stops bites more than stops midges coming to you. I also think you have to apply it more often than DEET, but it does do the job for me. Suspect its a personal thing.


I think it's more likely to be insect species and numbers rather than anything else. To my knowledge Smidge is using picaridin as active ingredient which is indeed repellent like DEET, unlike permethrin which is insecticide. Whenever I see or read about it being free of "nasty chemicals" I always smile since picaridin was developed in a lab by Bayer back in the 80's. It's highly effective though and I'd happily use it. Oddly, I never found picaridin based products at Boots; only at outdoor retailers. My guess is majority of casual users look for DEET as it's best known so a different "chemical" might not sell particularly well unless it has a strong brand like Smidge.
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Re: Smidge

Postby Scottk » Mon Jul 26, 2021 9:57 pm

Like Iain says, it is not pleasant in your eyes! Still preferable to midgies though. The thing I don’t like is that the smell gets on everything if you are out for a few nights.
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Re: Smidge

Postby WalkWithWallace » Tue Jul 27, 2021 8:22 am

Smidge would be my first choice, but I must admit I hardly ever use a repellent these days, instead I just wear; trousers or running tights, long sleeved base-layer, fingerless sun gloves, baseball cap and the midge net at the ready. 8)
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Re: Smidge

Postby boriselbrus » Tue Jul 27, 2021 4:15 pm

In my experience Smidge doesn't "repel" the midgies, but it does stop them biting when they land on you. I've had smidge covered legs coated in midgies but no bites so I'm happy with that. The swarming in your eyes, nose, ears etc though can really only be stopped by a headnet.

The clegs however can only really be stopped by the sort of suit worn by mediaeval knights! Bit hot at the moment though...
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Re: Smidge

Postby teaandpies » Mon Sep 06, 2021 1:39 pm

Charlie Chan wrote:Take care not to get it on your lips, eyes or nose. The small print says it can induce nausea and vomiting. My wife got a tiny amount on her lips and ended up with both of the above.



You'd be better off buying the bite relief in my opinion.
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Re: Smidge

Postby ahukippax » Tue Oct 19, 2021 7:58 pm

I think Smidge is one of the best of the repellents out there. It stops them biting but not being annoying.

In my opinion anyone who finds a way of stopping midges from being annoying should be knighted.
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Re: Smidge

Postby Bastonjock » Fri Oct 22, 2021 9:24 am

Often I wonder what the old Highlanders did to keep the midges ,ticks and clegs at bay
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Re: Smidge

Postby Alex W » Fri Oct 22, 2021 11:13 am

Bastonjock wrote:Often I wonder what the old Highlanders did to keep the midges ,ticks and clegs at bay

I too have wondered that. You pass shielings in the glens and realise that families lived there. Even the ones only occupied during the summer would be occupied in peak midge season. I also marvel at sheep and cows (and deer if I get close enough) who graze apparently unaffected by midges.

I wonder if our modern levels of cleanliness make us more susceptible to beasties. If your morning wash is a splash at the burn and you put on your smoke drenched clothes, maybe the midges are naturally repelled.

Or maybe it is maintaining a natural, additive free diet and developing immunity.
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Re: Smidge

Postby Mal Grey » Fri Oct 22, 2021 12:03 pm

Alex W wrote:If your morning wash is a splash at the burn and you put on your smoke drenched clothes, maybe the midges are naturally repelled.


I've tried this on plenty of multi-day canoe trips and can definitely say it doesn't work for me!! Worst midges were after 5 nights wild camping, with plenty of smoky firebox nights, and the midges revelled in it on the 6th night!


I've also pondered why a kilt (or the original wrap-style things) was chosen as attire in midge country! :shock:
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Re: Smidge

Postby Bonzo » Tue Nov 30, 2021 2:40 pm

Bastonjock wrote:Often I wonder what the old Highlanders did to keep the midges ,ticks and clegs at bay


I often wonder what anyone who lives in western Scotland does to keep the midges at bay.

It must be great having a place on the coast or next to a loch with great views but are you able to sit out between June and September?
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