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carrying cameras

Re: carrying cameras

Postby spiderwebb » Fri Oct 12, 2012 10:39 am

Use a Lowepro ?? can't recall the model but roughly box shaped and fits my DSLR with a belt loop big enough for my rucksac so it sits in front and is handy at all times, comes with a rain cover.

However, since purchasing a Panasonic HX WA2 in bright orange the DSLR hasn't been out. It does HD video, 10M pano pics and 14M standard 4:3, and its simply slips in the trouser pocket. Have done a few vids onto DVD and the picture quality to a large TV is superb, can't do full HD yet need a blue ray burner for the PC, but even as is it looks excellent.

Bonus its also waterproof !
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Re: carrying cameras

Postby tenohfive » Fri Oct 12, 2012 4:26 pm

I had this quandary recently (for a DSLR - 400D with Tokina 11-16mm as my walkaround lens) and couldn't find anything I liked that a) fit comfortably without rattling around, b) didn't have straps that interfered with my ruck and c) didn't cost a fortune. I looked at the Lowe Pro Toploader series but it was too bulky for me and the next nearest competition was something like Cotton Carrier stuff (in excess of £100.)

I ended up making my own sling from a neoprene/soft shell type holster and a pair of neck straps to create a chest holster. That held the camera with lens, and I got one of these to hold my other kit (a couple of smallish lenses, couple of filters, spare batteries and memory cards etc.)
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Lowepro-Lens-Case-1-Black/dp/B00009R896
The velcro straps slotted nicely over the hip straps of my ruck, though I admit I bought it for versatility as much as anything else - I strap it onto my camera bag to hold extra kit when I'm not in the hills.

I wore the whole setup on a trip up Helvellyn recently in a mixture of rain squalls and winds gusting up to about 50mph (according to MWIS anyway) and it performed brilliantly. Given that it would be showering one second then dry the next, getting stuff in and out worked like a dream. And it cost me about £20 in total. A bit of work involved but I didn't mind that.

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Re: carrying cameras

Postby WinterPapillas » Thu Oct 25, 2012 10:11 am

foggieclimber wrote:Image


That's my solution too! Works really well. I've even been known to go off mountain biking with my DSLR strapped to my chest like that!

The thing about cameras is, the best one is the one you can be bothered to take out and get shots. If it sits in your rucksack all day you're better off with a wee snapper.
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Re: carrying cameras

Postby Dwiea » Tue Oct 30, 2012 12:11 pm

I used a lowe pro rezo 100aw and bought some nylon strap and buckles, swivel clips, elastic strap and those wee slider things. I put some d rings on the straps that 'lift' the shoulder straps when I want to carry my camera I clip into the d-rings with the swivel clip and then onto the camera case. For the bottom to stop forward movement I sewed some drings onto short pieces of strap around the metal frame of my bag and have a strap that goes through the belt loop and a buckle so I can quickly remove it. It also has some elastic strap to alow it to flex. If anyone is interested I can try looking them out to take photos?
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Re: carrying cameras

Postby Michael Thomson » Tue Oct 30, 2012 1:51 pm

I use a Raidlight Equilibre front pack. I can carry a DSLR and have access to a map and some nibbles too, all just right at hand. Some photos here.
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Re: carrying cameras

Postby PhilTurner » Tue Oct 30, 2012 8:09 pm

Chris Townsend has written a blog post on this very subject quite recently, and his method is quite similar to mine (helenw, Chris and myself all use very similar cameras).

Link
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Re: carrying cameras

Postby foggieclimber » Wed Oct 31, 2012 2:52 pm

I'd say that was my second favourite option but did find it uncomfortable on the neck/shoulders compared with wearing it out front. My camera/lens is nearly 1.5kg though.
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Re: carrying cameras

Postby tenohfive » Wed Oct 31, 2012 7:55 pm

Michael Thomson wrote:I use a Raidlight Equilibre front pack. I can carry a DSLR and have access to a map and some nibbles too, all just right at hand. Some photos here.


What's the padding like? Is it just a chest pack or doest it have the padding you'd expect of a decent camera bag?
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Re: carrying cameras

Postby Shads » Wed Oct 31, 2012 8:49 pm

I use a sea to summit big river dry sack, a 3ltr is big enough, just roll down to right size and clip around front of rucksack......it keeps your camera dry, stops moisture getting into your camera and takes seconds to unclip...unroll and take out your camera for photos!!! http://www.seatosummit.com.au/showdetail.php?Code=ABRDB
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Re: carrying cameras

Postby Michael Thomson » Fri Dec 14, 2012 3:12 pm

tenohfive wrote:
Michael Thomson wrote:I use a Raidlight Equilibre front pack. I can carry a DSLR and have access to a map and some nibbles too, all just right at hand. Some photos here.


What's the padding like? Is it just a chest pack or doest it have the padding you'd expect of a decent camera bag?


Pretty much sod all, but I put a small piece of karrimat in the front and it protects very well. I use hobnob bars to cushion the sides!

Given it's position it's well protected unless I'm scrambling, in which case the DSLR either goes in my pack or is on an optech strap wedged between my pack and my back.
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