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Camping Pots and pans: Gear review

Camping Pots and pans: Gear review


Postby Paul Webster » Thu Nov 22, 2012 7:26 pm

Phil Turner wrote:Your cookware setup will be dictated by a number of factors – if you’re car-camping there’s little to stop you bringing a range of pots and pans and a twin-burner gas stove (and steak). If you’re backpacking you may think differently. My personal backpacking set-up is limited to a single pot with a capacity in the range of 900ml to 1400ml for non-winter use...

Click to read our new gear comparison review for camping pots and pans.
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Re: Camping Pots and pans: Gear review

Postby The Rodmiester » Thu Nov 22, 2012 9:02 pm

I love my MSR solo system, I have not seen the mug, and that looks good and stable, a lot better than the tall top heavy type that fall over readily. The pans fit together neatly with the handle fixing and the few holes in the top are good for draining pasta and the like. Yes good choice.
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Re: Camping Pots and pans: Gear review

Postby Rudolph » Thu Nov 22, 2012 10:13 pm

With the quality of dehydrated meals nowadays I can't see the point in taking extra pans to allow me (or Mrs S) to burn/ruin perfectly good food so I'll stick with a mytimug and a variety of stoves and burners. The only other essential cookware is an espresso maker - sadly not included in the review. :lol:

I do question the statement that heating the water for two meals is quicker and more fuel efficient than heating one after the other. I reckoned it was the other way about. :?
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Re: Camping Pots and pans: Gear review

Postby Gythral » Thu Nov 22, 2012 10:18 pm

Rudolph wrote:The only other essential cookware is an espresso maker


conjours up views of someone lugging

Image

and a generator up a munro, just to get a great coffee!!!
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Re: Camping Pots and pans: Gear review

Postby mrssanta » Thu Nov 22, 2012 11:43 pm

P6021287.JPG
Rudolph's espresso maker

the stove is a Decagon (cant remember the make) little titanium meths stove sheltered with the Hexagon (same can't remmeber make) on the summit of Schiehallion.
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Re: Camping Pots and pans: Gear review

Postby gaffr » Fri Nov 23, 2012 8:26 am

Got me weighing my own hybrid collection of 'camp cooking stuff' after reading the survey.....came out at 550 grms. including the loose-leaf tea inside the wee container. :)
It all fits inside the big pot and kettle....couldn't be without my wee kettle :) ....and leave a bit of room for a couple of packs of the dried soup. Oh, and the tea container is used as a drinking vessel....HM uses one of the lightweight metal new fangled mugs.
HPIM6277.JPG
My hybrid well used cooking set.
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Re: Camping Pots and pans: Gear review

Postby The Rodmiester » Fri Nov 23, 2012 9:24 am

gaffr, I've got a set like that :D , I think it originally came with two pots, but as you say everything goes in the large pot and the wee kettle is an absolute must :) . Yours is diffinately a well used model :lol: , I like it, very light and compact. I must get a lightweight and not a top heavy mug, any suggestions.
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Re: Camping Pots and pans: Gear review

Postby PhilTurner » Fri Nov 23, 2012 10:37 am

Rudolph wrote:I do question the statement that heating the water for two meals is quicker and more fuel efficient than heating one after the other. I reckoned it was the other way about. :?


Yeah, I pondered this for a while (as you do) and would love to hear your reasoning. I'm no scientist, but I decided that the thermal energy required to boil 2 litres of water is the same whether it's in two 1 litre pots or one 2 litre pot, so heat loss variables should be considered. As well as heating the water you'll also need to heat the pot, and in a real-life situation once the first 1l of water has boiled and you've messed around pouring the water into the pouch, the pot (and anything else that gets hot) will have cooled, and require bringing up to temperature again. Meths stoves will also require you to wait for the stove to cool before relighting (unless you leave it burning, but that's not particularly fuel efficient). Smaller capacity pots tend to have smaller external dimensions, which can lead to an inefficient use of heat if the flames are licking up the side of the pot - a wide and shallow pot is best. Of course, two stoves and two 1l pots may be the most fuel efficient, but then you'd have to carry two stoves.

If you're a two-course hot dinner person boiling two consecutive pots of water may be more practical, using the first boil for your main course, and then boiling a further pot whilst waiting for it to rehydrate. Timed right, the second pan of boiling water can be added to your dessert just as the main course is ready, and the dessert rehydration will be complete when you finish your main course. There's something to practice now that the nights are drawing in!
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Re: Camping Pots and pans: Gear review

Postby murwilson » Fri Nov 23, 2012 12:25 pm

http://www.gsioutdoors.com/products/pdp/halulite_minimalist/

Gas and small stove drop inside the pot, only ever boil water for coffee or adding to dehydrated meals. Weighs a might 180g or thereabouts without gas and stove.

The little silicone pot lifter is genius :)

Mur
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Re: Camping Pots and pans: Gear review

Postby Rudolph » Fri Nov 23, 2012 4:39 pm

PhilTurner wrote:would love to hear your reasoning.

Really? Fair enough! You have made my day!

It is as you say all about heat loss. The longer something stays at high temperature, the more energy will be lost.

My feeling is that my stoves seem to be able to get the water warm very quickly but struggle to get the last few degrees to boiling. I put that down to the extra rate of heat lost at the higher temperature. More water in the pan means more heat loss - just because of the greater surface area (and yes we can argue about the effective surface area of a half filled pot). Taken to extremes that means that there will be some (large) amount of water where the stove output balances the heat lost before the water is boiled. Consequence is that the larger quanity takes an infinite amount of fuel to boil and so is the most inefficient. I feel that a smaller amount of water gets through that last little bit much more quickly (ie more than twice as quickly) and so is more efficient.

I think this effect is most acute in winter when II'm using meths stoves or the gas is not going well so the stove output is down. It's just a feeling with a bit of invented science to justify myself but I now feel driven to do a proper test sometime!
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Re: Camping Pots and pans: Gear review

Postby Caberfeidh » Fri Nov 23, 2012 6:39 pm

I prefer the good old fashioned fire and billy-can approach...
Norse Pyre.jpg
Gundestrup-cauldron.gif
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Re: Camping Pots and pans: Gear review

Postby tenohfive » Tue Nov 27, 2012 8:32 pm

Might be handy for Phil, given a couple of references in the review. I've got the 650ml version for drinking and to hold simple easy boil meals like couscous:
http://www.thebushcraftstore.co.uk/swedish-mess-kit-og-folding-cup-443-p.asp

I love anything that does it's job really well, and whilst it's a simple design it just works.
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Re: Camping Pots and pans: Gear review

Postby basscadet » Wed Nov 28, 2012 9:47 am

I have the alpkit one, and I can vouch that it is pretty darn good.. Has enough capacity to cook for two (wouldn't dream of buying the dehydrated nonsense - got to be proper food!) and has plenty of room inside for my burner, pot scraper, washing up liquid, lighter, fuel measuring cup and salt n pepper. The bag that it comes with has enough room to fit in a sea to summit foldable bowl & cup for a friend also :) For my cup though, I have a melamine picnic beaker I got out of the supermarket for a pound, which is just the right size to fit the rest of my stove and my cutlery inside.. It works well for me :D

As for the boiling 2 cups of water.. I'm with Rudolph, it is definately quicker to do it seperately.. I dont understand the reasons for that, but it is fact :wink:
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Re: Camping Pots and pans: Gear review

Postby mrssanta » Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:41 pm

my cup
99p in a cheap shop
weighs next to nothing and holds 350ml of tea. and it makes me happy.
I dont like drinking out of a metal beaker, because it gets to hot around the rim.
P6021288.JPG
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