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Advice on backpacks, water bottles vs. camelback

Re: Advice on backpacks, water bottles vs. camelback

Postby BobMcBob » Sun Jun 25, 2017 8:58 pm

I don't get how people can 'forget' to stop to drink? You've got a great big reminder going off in the fact that you get thirsty, how can you forget that?

Yes there's a school of thought that suggests you should drink enough that you don't get thirsty but that's mostly cobblers unless you're really working up a massive sweat and not stopping for any reason.
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Re: Advice on backpacks, water bottles vs. camelback

Postby Robinho08 » Tue Jun 27, 2017 12:34 pm

BobMcBob wrote:I don't get how people can 'forget' to stop to drink? You've got a great big reminder going off in the fact that you get thirsty, how can you forget that?

Yes there's a school of thought that suggests you should drink enough that you don't get thirsty but that's mostly cobblers unless you're really working up a massive sweat and not stopping for any reason.


I disagree. The trick is not to get thirsty, if you're thirsty, you've left it too late! Hydration bladders make it far easier to stay hydrated.

Hillwalking uses a lot of energy and fluids.
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Re: Advice on backpacks, water bottles vs. camelback

Postby BobMcBob » Tue Jun 27, 2017 1:08 pm

Robinho08 wrote:
BobMcBob wrote:I don't get how people can 'forget' to stop to drink? You've got a great big reminder going off in the fact that you get thirsty, how can you forget that?

Yes there's a school of thought that suggests you should drink enough that you don't get thirsty but that's mostly cobblers unless you're really working up a massive sweat and not stopping for any reason.


I disagree. The trick is not to get thirsty, if you're thirsty, you've left it too late! Hydration bladders make it far easier to stay hydrated.

Hillwalking uses a lot of energy and fluids.


In 30 years I've never suffered from the effects of dehydration during exercise, and that includes my professional life doing hard outdoor work in hot temperatures. Stop regularly, drink some water, if you get thirsty take a rest in the shade, drink some water. If you're a professional athlete, or there's some reason you can't stop and rest then perhaps a bladder would be a useful system, but for the average hillwalker there's no need to "make it far easier", I mean how difficult is it to drink from a bottle? :)
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Re: Advice on backpacks, water bottles vs. camelback

Postby nathan79 » Tue Jun 27, 2017 2:44 pm

If you're not carrying camping or cooking gear a 30L is the most you should need. Try on the ones you're thinking of for size. Personally I've never thought size and fit matter too much with regards to rucksacks, but one that's right for your shape will be far more comfy.

Bladder or bottles? Both. You can't beat the convenience of a bladder for continuous hydration. When you want to top up (and treat/sterilise) from a burn or drink anything flavoured, juice, electrolytes or whatever use the bottle.
They both have their plus points and minus points, it's all about which you prefer.
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Re: Advice on backpacks, water bottles vs. camelback

Postby Robinho08 » Tue Jun 27, 2017 6:15 pm

BobMcBob wrote:
Robinho08 wrote:
BobMcBob wrote:I don't get how people can 'forget' to stop to drink? You've got a great big reminder going off in the fact that you get thirsty, how can you forget that?

Yes there's a school of thought that suggests you should drink enough that you don't get thirsty but that's mostly cobblers unless you're really working up a massive sweat and not stopping for any reason.


I disagree. The trick is not to get thirsty, if you're thirsty, you've left it too late! Hydration bladders make it far easier to stay hydrated.

Hillwalking uses a lot of energy and fluids.


In 30 years I've never suffered from the effects of dehydration during exercise, and that includes my professional life doing hard outdoor work in hot temperatures. Stop regularly, drink some water, if you get thirsty take a rest in the shade, drink some water. If you're a professional athlete, or there's some reason you can't stop and rest then perhaps a bladder would be a useful system, but for the average hillwalker there's no need to "make it far easier", I mean how difficult is it to drink from a bottle? :)


Fair enough, that's you, everybody is different. Not sure why someone would be so against using a bladder though?

I use the little but often method when it comes to hydration and eating and that works fine. Plus I don't want to take my rucksack off every time I want a drink. 8)
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Re: Advice on backpacks, water bottles vs. camelback

Postby BobMcBob » Tue Jun 27, 2017 9:32 pm

Robinho08 wrote:Not sure why someone would be so against using a bladder though?


Fair shout :) I'm not sure either, I just think they're stupid :D
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Re: Advice on backpacks, water bottles vs. camelback

Postby bydand_loon » Tue Jun 27, 2017 9:51 pm

Bottle fan here.

i get camelbacks at work (actually with a handy wee pull through cleaning kit, never seen anyone using it mind :D ). Happy enough using a camelback in strange countries that lack refill points/burns, but in Scotland I rarely struggle to find water :shock:

Camelbacks just weigh to much for my liking, especially when full & I just can't see a reason for carrying that much water here, there nae handy for filling or checking how much is left etc. I also find that each time you take a drink the first few mouthfuls have warmed up in the pipe, eventually the whole bag warms a bit, much prefer freezing and fresh from the burn. Not really a huge worry but im just not overly keen in having a big bag of water in beside my doss bag/clothing/stuff

I tend to buy a wee platic bottle (maybe two) prior to setting out and refilling it on the move from burns, most of my bergans and day packs have easy access pouches so you can reach it & put it back on the move, the one that doesn't have pockets has bungee cord holders on the shoulder straps, even easier to access.

I think my record for 1 plastic bottle was a 10/11 day trip, it was pretty goosed at the end though, just be carefully not to mix it up with the bivi bottle :shock:
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Re: Advice on backpacks, water bottles vs. camelback

Postby BobMcBob » Wed Jun 28, 2017 10:03 am

BobMcBob wrote:
Robinho08 wrote:Not sure why someone would be so against using a bladder though?


Fair shout :) I'm not sure either, I just think they're stupid :D


No wait, I do know why I don't like them. It's because I was traumatised by this as a child :D
03822a3d-9082-4923-8844-075ffc7ab4a9.png
Peter Frampton

I still remember the spit running down the tube while he sang. Makes me feel a little bit sick even now. I think I'll refer to bladders as 'Framptons' from now on, to remind me why I don't want one :D
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Re: Advice on backpacks, water bottles vs. camelback

Postby basscadet » Wed Jun 28, 2017 3:44 pm

BobMcBob wrote:
In 30 years I've never suffered from the effects of dehydration during exercise, and that includes my professional life doing hard outdoor work in hot temperatures. Stop regularly, drink some water, if you get thirsty take a rest in the shade, drink some water. If you're a professional athlete, or there's some reason you can't stop and rest then perhaps a bladder would be a useful system, but for the average hillwalker there's no need to "make it far easier", I mean how difficult is it to drink from a bottle? :)



Really? I'm so jealous :? I suffer awfully on a hot day - recently I did the Buachaille in the heat - only about 5 hours walk/scramble. I drank 2.5 litres during the walk but felt awful that evening and it took a further 5 litres before I was back to something resembling normal :lol:
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Re: Advice on backpacks, water bottles vs. camelback

Postby teaandpies » Wed Jun 28, 2017 11:23 pm

Sheryl wrote:I'm hiking the West Highland Way – plus the Kelvin Way (out of Glasgow) and Ben Nevis -- over 9 days in late September. It's my first multi-day hike in Scotland.

I don't want to carry a pack over 40L. I won't carry camping or cooking gear. I’m looking at the Osprey Farpoint 40, Osprey Stratos 36 (with optional camelback) or North Face Overhaul 40. Anyone have experience with those? Recommendations? I'm a small woman, if that makes a difference.

I've never hiked with a camelback. Thoughts on that vs. 2 water bottles?

Thanks in advance!



The Farpoint packs are for travel with hide away carry straps rather than a long distance hiking pack.
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Re: Advice on backpacks, water bottles vs. camelback

Postby Ben Nachie » Thu Jun 29, 2017 8:22 am

Which of the three packs? The Stratos, definitely.
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Re: Advice on backpacks, water bottles vs. camelback

Postby Jonotron » Thu Jun 29, 2017 7:52 pm

I find 2L out a camelbak not quite enough on a long warm day, or strenuous MTb route. I bought a lifestraw go bottle after running out a few times, fill it from any old stream and it's fine.
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Re: Advice on backpacks, water bottles vs. camelback

Postby spiderwebb » Fri Jun 30, 2017 4:44 pm

Certainly is a user preference thing. I'm still a bottle fave, I don't have any trouble remembering to drink or keep hydrated, its automatic whenever I stop, take off the sack, take in the views or simply want a break. I can understand each argument and the bladder would certainly be better if you were avoiding breaks, if you had a long day and/or you're looking to beat the clock.
Winter, the cold drink in the Sigg is replaced with the flask, still requiring a stop of course but that's part of the day for me, no rush.
Multiple cups of splosh (Tea) at the end sort me out :D
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Re: Advice on backpacks, water bottles vs. camelback

Postby chickadee » Sat Jul 01, 2017 3:30 pm

BobMcBob wrote:I don't get how people can 'forget' to stop to drink? You've got a great big reminder going off in the fact that you get thirsty, how can you forget that?

Yes there's a school of thought that suggests you should drink enough that you don't get thirsty but that's mostly cobblers unless you're really working up a massive sweat and not stopping for any reason.


Is this a response to my comment where I said I often forgot to drink enough? I think it's fine if *you* don't forget and you never get dehydrated. That's great! We're not all the same. I saw a problem in that I didn't take in enough water and felt rubbish at the end of the day. I solved the problem by getting a hydration bladder. Other people can certainly use bottles if that's what they prefer. There isn't anything wrong with using something that works, and if you don't want to use something that makes 'life far easier', you don't have to, but please don't tell me there's no need when, for me, there is.

You say 'you get thirsty' but actually often I have found that I'm not actually feeling thirsty and therefore don't drink enough. If I'm thirsty, naturally I will have a drink. But you can lose a lot through sweat etc on a hill without realising, and that's where I found it difficult. I needed more than I was drinking even when I felt thirsty.
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Re: Advice on backpacks, water bottles vs. camelback

Postby BobMcBob » Sat Jul 01, 2017 3:54 pm

chickadee wrote:
BobMcBob wrote:I don't get how people can 'forget' to stop to drink? You've got a great big reminder going off in the fact that you get thirsty, how can you forget that?

Yes there's a school of thought that suggests you should drink enough that you don't get thirsty but that's mostly cobblers unless you're really working up a massive sweat and not stopping for any reason.


Is this a response to my comment where I said I often forgot to drink enough? I think it's fine if *you* don't forget and you never get dehydrated. That's great! We're not all the same. I saw a problem in that I didn't take in enough water and felt rubbish at the end of the day. I solved the problem by getting a hydration bladder. Other people can certainly use bottles if that's what they prefer. There isn't anything wrong with using something that works, and if you don't want to use something that makes 'life far easier', you don't have to, but please don't tell me there's no need when, for me, there is.

You say 'you get thirsty' but actually often I have found that I'm not actually feeling thirsty and therefore don't drink enough. If I'm thirsty, naturally I will have a drink. But you can lose a lot through sweat etc on a hill without realising, and that's where I found it difficult. I needed more than I was drinking even when I felt thirsty.


Sorry if you took offence, it was a question rather than a criticism - a question you have answered very clearly.
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