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Jeans question

Re: Jeans question

Postby CharlesT » Sun Oct 06, 2019 8:00 am

Bag a pair o' these, problem solved. :D
Emilio-Comici173.jpg
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Re: Jeans question

Postby Ronnie Hillbagger » Sun Oct 06, 2019 12:31 pm

Aye, tweed is the way forward and upwards.
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Re: Jeans question

Postby CharlesT » Mon Oct 07, 2019 2:28 pm

Ronnie Hillbagger wrote:Aye, tweed is the way forward and upwards.


I had a pair very similar in my (very) early climbing days.

For the curious the pic is of Emilio Comici, the "Angel of the Dolomites" - first ascent of the north face of the Cima Grande de Laveredo among others.
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Re: Jeans question

Postby regedmunds » Tue Oct 08, 2019 9:18 pm

I bought a £70 pair of Marmot walking trousers then a pair of Decathlon walking trousers for £7.99. The Decathlon trousers are so much better. They also wash so easily, dry so easily, weigh so little, are hard wearing and fit me perfectly.

My suggestion is to find your trousers (sorry I can't help you with this) but please do NOT buy waterproof trousers, horrible things in my view, a faff to get on, a faff to get off and you will get HOT in all of the wrong places! I have a pair of waterproof boots, a pair of waterproof gaiters and a RAIN SKIRT (homemade from Silnylon £10, have a look on You Tube) which when it rains, is on in an instant and when it stops, is off in an instant and then when dry squishes down to the size of a golf ball for storage.
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Re: Jeans question

Postby davekeiller » Thu Oct 10, 2019 12:25 pm

The trouble with jeans is, I think, twofold.

The first problem is that once they get wet, they stay wet and lose pretty much all thermal insulation so you're likely to get cold and wet. It might be possible to proof them sufficiently that they repel water, although I'm not sure it's worth bothering.

The second problem is that denim's a pretty heavy fabric, which means it's not overly comfortable for walking long distances especially in warm conditions. The seams are also likely to rub, which would eventually get pretty sore.

A couple of brands (alpkit, paramo, maybe others) sell technical jeans which look like denim (for the casual look in the pub) but are actually a technical fabric for performance. That's a better bet than trying to proof your Levi's, although really the only solution is to go to a gear shop and try different pairs on until you find a pair that fit.
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Re: Jeans question

Postby crfishwick » Wed Oct 23, 2019 11:45 pm

Mearnsgeek wrote:Hi,

I may well do this experiment myself but I wondered if anyone had treated a pair of jeans with Nikwax Tech Wash or equivalent?

My motivation is the fact that I'm trying to find a new pair of walking trousers. I'm a bit overweight and I tried on some Craghoppers Kiwi and Kiwi pro which I could get in my size. The problem is that they seem to assume that if you've got a larger waist you're going to have massive chunky legs as well which I don't. The result is that they were stupidly large, and flappy round my shins which I know would have driven me daft.

So, back to the jeans - I realised that I've got a pair of jeans which fit perfectly and they have a bit of stretch in them so they aren't at all restrictive. If you treated them to solve the problem of them being a nightmare when wet, would they be usable on the hills?

Any thoughts? Alternatively, if there are any trouser recommendations too that would be great. I vary between 40-42 inch waist.

Thanks,

He when I was a young man jeans fir walking was a No No. Still is in my opinion :D Especially Levi's. Tha' can pickup decent pair of walking trousers for a pittance nowadays! On a par with most expensive gear. Plus don't require waterproofing. :D
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Re: Jeans question

Postby Marty_JG » Thu Oct 24, 2019 12:34 am

The £15 pair of hiking trousers I just got from Lidl are working out great. Not sure of the longevity and they don't have much in the way of pockets, but if they get wet they dry pretty much instantly.
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Re: Jeans question

Postby Glengavel » Thu Oct 24, 2019 11:43 am

A decent pair of flared trousers and you can climb anything.

Image

One decent gust of wind and he'd have been off.

The bit where Noakes is climbing up the outwardly-canted ladder, flares and anorak flapping loosely about him, gives me the screaming abdabs.

Image
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Re: Jeans question

Postby jamiecopeland » Fri Nov 01, 2019 11:34 am

Might it be a better idea to lose weight? I appreciate that’s an easy thing to say. However, not only would you fit into the walking trousers you like but your overall health may benefit.

Failing that you could buy the walking trousers that fit your waist and have a seamstress sort out the length/width of the leg?
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Re: Jeans question

Postby Border Reiver » Fri Nov 01, 2019 3:00 pm

I used to walk and work outdoors in jeans and never had a problem, most farmers seem to wear them. Of course I discovered that there were far more suitable materials for making outdoor clothing and I no longer wear jeans for walking. The problem will be when the climate change activists pressure governments and manufacturers to stop using anything made out of fossil fuels and make gear from stuff like cotton, wool, silk etc. That would virtually eliminate almost all current outdoor gear, although what gear I have will see me through.
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