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Wanderings from Wasdale

Wanderings from Wasdale


Postby Sgurr » Thu Sep 15, 2022 11:55 pm

Wainwrights included on this walk: Cold Pike, Crinkle Crags, Lingmell, Slight Side

Hewitts included on this walk: Cold Pike, Crinkle Crags (Long Top), Lingmell

Date walked: 09/09/2022

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After a week snapping Weather Watcher pictures, I had one last try at Wast Water, and HOORAY, got an Editor’s Pick.
I had meant to take this holiday in August, but the travails of downsizing from an eighteen bookshelf house to a two bookshelf flat overwhelmed me. Luckily the owners of Rainors Farm in Wasdale were happy to let me postpone until September, and although still living in my house, I had de cluttered to a huge extent, and the temperature was probably far better for walking.
September 9th 2022. Lingmell 6.91 km 727m ascent.
I managed to park at Wasdale Head near the pub, and set off on the footpath for Scafell
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The lake looks lovely from every direction And height
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but BBC Weather Watchers didn’t want any of my pictures on this holiday until the very last day (see the end).

I kept an eye open for the path to the left up the ridge, which I expected to be far steeper than it was, but I had climbed Hartsop Dodd at the end of the previous holiday, and my knees were all geared up for something like that.
The path
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NOT the summit, but a bit over half way
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Looking across to the Scafells
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And again
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Looking down to Wasdale head
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A guy overtook me near the top, but explained it was no use talking to him as he couldn’t hear a word I said.
I stopped and took a couple of photos where he had,
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He picked good views, but was too late to snap the row of figures in the cloud on the summit, as they were descending by the time I got there.
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A later encounter revealed that they were fund-raising for a cancer charity under the auspices of KPMG (though none of them were accountants). I think KPMG goes in for a lot of this stuff, as when I went to my hairdresser’s “New Salon” party, and found that the only thing we had in common was Linda does our hair, I happily found the husband of her friend helping out in the kitchen with a lejog shirt, and we spent half an hour discussing logistiscs. KPMG had arranged the whole thing to erecting tents to pit stops en-route, whereas daughter and I had youth hostelled.
By the time I reached the top, there was no-one left to take my photo and the cloud had turned to rain.
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My B & B hosts had suggested looping back down to the path rather than returning the same way, so I did so, but rather regretted it as the stone staircase took a toll on my knees.
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Right at the end, at 3.30 p.m. I met two guys and a girl in shorts but minus rain gear who asked me if they were stupid to be starting up so late. I’m afraid I said that I thought so, but a subsequent face book discussion thought they could easily make it up and down before the light went. However, they were obviously speedy youths and had no intention of taking advice from an octogenarian. It was still raining
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The next day, the forecast beautiful day had moved into Sunday, so as my knees were feeling it, I took a day of meandering around taking Weather Watcher pics for the BBC, none of which they wanted, and landed up at Muncaster Castle for an hour or so. They have a new attraction “Feeding the Herons””. The herons had been ignoring the food and catching their own so the staff were very pleased to see them appear. I was a bit grumpy as I had left my phone in the car, so decided it was better just to be able to wander along the sea front at home and see them in the wild.
On Sunday 11th Sept I climbed Slightside 11 km and 914 metres
I parked at a small NTS car park opposite Wha House and followed a path. At first it kept close to the wall
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Below, looking back
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Then set off more steeply up hill.
I must have lost the main one at one place since when I glanced at my phone, the purple arrow that was me had moved to the right quite a bit, but I veered back onto it and soon found myself obviously attacking the hill itself.
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I was glad I hadn’t studied it too much as I might have been a bit nervous about the rough top, but when I got there, and couldn’t see how to get up, I was joined by a young couple who pointed out the way. Thanks Matt and Freya, I wouldn’t have had the confidence to do it without you. Were they just an illusion? My phone thinks so (below)
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As soon as I left the top, a load of cloud rolled in
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Below, a selfie against the rocky top
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I thought it would be easier to follow the path down, and so it was to start with,
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Below, a couple of Herdwicks. Sheep in the Lake District must be much more habituated to people than our Scottish ones that run away on sight. These might stop munching for a while, but move only reluctantly when you get too close
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Below, looking back
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but no amount of pirouetting around with my phone and studying the purple arrow found me the right descent amongst the bracken, so knowing I had come up via a wall, I just plunged down towards it, and although I hit it a good deal too far east, there was another couple I could hear talking down there, equally lost. I persuaded them I had followed a wall on the way up, so that was all we needed to do,
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We emerged in time for a drink at the pub where I met up with a young couple who had overtaken me on the hill.
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They were really touring cyclists just doing this for a change. Their next plan was to fly to Indonesia and get as near home as possible before time ran out and they had to catch another plane.
Monday 12th Sept.was forecast to be wet, so I had planned a museum, but it wasn’t open on a Monday, so I caught the “Ratty” train instead and rode it all the way from Ravenglass to Dalegarth. It did rain.
On Tuesday 13th. September I drove up to the summit of the Wrynose Pass, luckily bagging the last place and set out for Crinkle Crags. (8.5 km 515 m ascent) It is an easy to find path going directly along. Below
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Below, uphill
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Walking past Cold Pike
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Below, getting along nicely towards the Crinkles
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Looking back down
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I don’t why I was surprised to find it distinctly craggy towards the end, after all, the give-away is in the name.
Below, getting a bit crinkly…or craggy
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The summit of the first Crinkle
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On the ridge
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The Bad Step. No, I wasn’t going anywhere near there, but took the bypass path.
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A kind gent took my photo on the top,
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Below, setting off down the bypass path. I was so scared that I might lose it, that I scuttled back from the summit while I could still remember where it was, and had my lunch guarding it, in case it ran away.
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Below, looking back at braver folk than me attempting the Bad Step
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Below, view from the ridge
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Below, getting nearer to Cold Pike
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Below, a pool at the last ascent to Cold Pike
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Below, the summit of Cold Pike. The summit selfie didn’t work
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Below, the Crinkles zoomed from the summit of Cold Pike
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Descending Cold Pike. The outward path was visible, so I made for that
ImageNearly back. As is almost inevitable, mine was the last car in the car-park.
After a week snapping Weather Watcher pictures, I had one last try at Wast Water, and HOORAY, got an Editor’s Pick.
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User avatar
Sgurr
Munro compleatist
 
Posts: 5694
Munros:282   Corbetts:222
Fionas:219   Donalds:89+52
Sub 2000:569   Hewitts:172
Wainwrights:214   Islands:58
Joined: Nov 15, 2010
Location: Fife

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