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Walks with stolen camera Part 3

Walks with stolen camera Part 3


Postby BlackPanther » Fri Jul 15, 2011 2:10 pm

Date walked: 14/07/2011

Time taken: 3 hours

Distance: 12 km

Ascent: 286m

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Weather forecast for the weekend to come gives us very little hope :( Heavy rain, thunderstorms, thick cloud... What a shame.
Bearing that in mind I grabbed another chance to walk the hills over Beauly. This time my main focus was on visiting the forest in search for edible mushrooms. So my report will be more about the surrounding wildlife than views, although the latter are nice from any higher ground above Beauly and Muir of Ord.

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My target was Rheindown Wood. From Beauly I walked uphill and then turned right towards Clashandorran and Aultvaich. Weather was so-so - warm but cloudy:
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Kessock bridge:
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Muir of Ord from above:
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The track to Clashandorran with the houses of Beauly in the background:
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Lunch time for birds:
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Soldier beetles kept themselves occupied :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Beauly Firth from the track past Clashandorran:
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Muir of Ord again:
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Ben Wyvis came into view:
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I was walking along pastures now and rabbits were everywhere. Some of them behaved more like meerkats though (Simples???)
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On a field in Aultvaich I noticed a pair of cute, little ponies - one of them even agreed to pose for a few photos :lol: :lol:
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Black devil?...
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The track branching to Aultvaich ends in the village, but one can continue walking through the woods, as there are a few paths leading in different directions.
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As soon as I dived into the forest, I forgot about the whole world - there were so many things to photograph and some to pick as well!
Chanterelle (Cantharellus cibarius) - one of the tastiest mushrooms in our woods, grows mainly under pines and spruces, usually in large "families". It is so characteristic and easy to spot even for inexperienced mushroom pickers. Lovely in creamy soup, in dumplings, fantastic for stir-fries. My favourite mushroom by far. Yum yum!
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Sand bolete (Suillus variegatus) - another tasty edible mushroom, can be collected in large quantities as it also grows in groups under pines. Good for drying, also fried and as pizza topping. Requires a bit of cleaning though but it's worth the effort.
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Crowded brittlegill (Russula densifolia) - this one is edible but I personally don't pick them as they are easy to mistake them for other, poisonous species.
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Sickener (Russula emetica) - beware! This lovely looking red capped fungi causes stomach upsets (as the name suggests).
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This is probably a young death cap (Amanita phalloides), the most dangerous mushroom in our forests. Well, it won't chase you down the woods :lol: :lol: but a single fruiting body contains enough toxin called amanitine to kill an adult human. The toxin cannot be destroyed by cooking or drying and there is no cure to it, apart from liver transplant. Scary :? :? This one little nasty mushroom is the sole reason why I don't pick brittlegills - young ones look so similar to death caps that even with my degree in toxicology I can never be sure which is which. Better safe than sorry!
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I left the death cap where it grew and continued to wander around the forest:
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I emerged from the woods somewhere near Dunmore - just to get some good views:
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The distant Cromarty Firth:
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I took some pics and dived into the forest one more time. I managed to pick about 1 kg of chanterelles and boletes and as it was getting really late when I found myself back in Aultvaich, I decided it was time to go home.
The mushrooms I found were of course served for dinner and as we are still alive and kicking today, I'm sure I didn't mistakenly mix any death caps in :lol: :lol:
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BlackPanther
Mountain Walker
 
Posts: 3703
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Joined: Nov 2, 2010
Location: Beauly, Inverness-shire

Re: Walks with stolen camera Part 3

Postby ndhudson » Fri Jul 15, 2011 4:31 pm

You sure are enjoying a few sneaky days out with the forbidden camera! :lol: I'm glad your sharing the Beauly area...I really miss it! Loved reading about the various mushroom types...I wish I new half as much about wild mushrooms as you do. What kind of work do you do in toxicology?
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ndhudson
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Re: Walks with stolen camera Part 3

Postby BlackPanther » Fri Jul 15, 2011 4:45 pm

ndhudson wrote:You sure are enjoying a few sneaky days out with the forbidden camera! :lol: I'm glad your sharing the Beauly area...I really miss it! Loved reading about the various mushroom types...I wish I new half as much about wild mushrooms as you do. What kind of work do you do in toxicology?


I did my PhD in that area a few years ago - natural toxins as insecticides. Mushrooms are just a hobby, but my scientific background certainly helps :D
Very few people in Scotland pick mushrooms so on a good day I can bring home up to 10 kg. The absolute record was 14 kg between me and my husband. We didn't eat them all immediately of course, but they freeze well. Last year I had enough in my freezer to last till Christmas :lol:
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BlackPanther
Mountain Walker
 
Posts: 3703
Munros:260   Corbetts:172
Grahams:123   
Sub 2000:56   
Joined: Nov 2, 2010
Location: Beauly, Inverness-shire

Re: Walks with stolen camera Part 3

Postby ndhudson » Fri Jul 15, 2011 6:13 pm

Natural toxins as insecticides sounds interesting, though a bit over my artsy-fartsy head.Thank heavens for smart people like you! ;)

That's a shame about not many mushroom pickers in Scotland...all the more for you and your hubby to enjoy! I would be in heaven with a freezer full of Chanterelles...and the walk to find them would be an added bonus!!! :D
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ndhudson
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Joined: May 16, 2011
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah

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