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Following in Foggie's Footsteps in Fisherfield

Following in Foggie's Footsteps in Fisherfield


Postby JOHNGG » Mon Aug 01, 2011 4:43 pm

Corbetts included on this walk: Beinn a'Chaisgein Mor

Date walked: 30/07/2011

Time taken: 7.5 hours

Distance: 30.2 km

Ascent: 1000m

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Having been inspired by Foggie Climber's award winning report on his final Corbett I set aside Saturday to tick off Beinn a Chaisgein Mor from the list, attempting the long cycle in from Gruinard Bay in the North. The forecast was fine so I was away by 7.15 am and parked and on my bike by 9.15 am. A few clouds were hanging around but I had faith in Kat Cubie's predictions of blue skies by noon, so off I set.

Gruinard July 2011 002.JPG


The track alongside the river made for fairly easy cycling, most of the time, and i was glad I had made the decision to fit larger tyres front and back to cushion the bumpy journey. The glen itself is simply wonderful, and as you cycle you see the north end of Beinn Dearg Beag beckoning, and getting closer and closer. I made good progress stopping only for a quick chat to a fisherman on his way home fishless, and to spend a few minutes watching a big black dragon fly dipping its tail in a puddle (egg laying ?)


Gruinard July 2011 003.JPG
Looking up Allt Loch Ghlubseachain


I abandoned the bike where the bridge crossed the and set off along the side of the . I went up the west side which was hard going as it's all sloping ground. Much easier to cross and then make your way up the east side. Still, I was making good time and no problems apart from fighting off an army of clegs - which required the fleece to go back on for a bit until I'd squashed most of them and I could remove it in safety.

I headed up towards where the stalkers path starts to the north of, but then decided I'd prefer a more direct route and headed up to the ridge. There's nothing technical on it and I was not long in getting to the top of Creag na Sgoinnne where I had my first view of Beinn a Chaisgein Mor. I was glad to see there was no cloud hanging around the top - not like Beinn Dearg Beag which was well shrouded as i had cycled in.

Gruinard July 2011 008.JPG
Looking south towards Ruadh stac Mhor


Making my way south along the ridge to Creag Mehall mor I had some particularly fine views to savour. The only downside is that you lose about 100m of height dropping to the bealach before starting to climb the final slopes to the summit. As I plodded up the slopes I was reminded of my local hills , the Eastern Grampians round Glen Shee and Glen Clova, with their round grassy covered slopes. What a contrast to An Teallach just a few miles away.

The summit was reached about three and a half hours after leaving my car. The large cairn is not the highest point and I stood on a few rocks to the north east which were clearly higher, although you'd have to be a real meany to deny somebody a "tick" on this hill for the sake of a few feet. Given the effort in getting to the top I was wondering if this was the most remote/difficult to get to Corbett of them all and I couldn't think of any others that had taken quite such an effort. Maybe Ben Aden will be harder, but I've invested in a canoe for that expedition so I am hoping not. The views are fantastic.

Gruinard July 2011 012.JPG
View from the summit


Gruinard July 2011 014.JPG
More views


Gruinard July 2011 017.JPG
Looking west over Fionn Loch


The start of the walk back was straightforward as the grassy slopes on the north side make for pleasant walking. I headed down and picked up the stalkers path at the foot of Beinn a Chaisgein Beag and then followed it to its end. As I was descending I saw an eagle fly over and towards Beinn a Chaisgein Beag where it settled. It must be my favourite flying animal, the golden eagle. (for the record - wasps and clegs are my joint least favourite.) The views behind you are worth checking out as well. Scary north ridge onto Beinn Dearg Beag.

Gruinard July 2011 018.JPG
Looking back up at North ridge of Beinn Dearg Beag


The ground is pretty rough and a bit boggy in places but I was soon back at the bike and then heading down the rough track along the river and back to the car happy in the knowledge I had another well earned "tick". As it turned out I had 3 ticks, one for the corbett and two being "passengers" who had hitched a lift and had to be removed the next morning from my leg with a needle, after they had been painted with clear nail varnish to cut off their air supply and kill them. I think I'll be wearing long trousers from now on....
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Last edited by JOHNGG on Mon Aug 01, 2011 8:37 pm, edited 4 times in total.
JOHNGG
 
Posts: 41
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Re: Following in Foggie's Footsteps in Fisherfield

Postby monty » Mon Aug 01, 2011 6:10 pm

Hey Johngg, Thats a long way to go for a Corbett or any hill come to think of it. Well done. No Photies? :D
monty
 

Re: Following in Foggie's Footsteps in Fisherfield

Postby kinley » Mon Aug 01, 2011 6:16 pm

Look forward to the pics - it is possibly the best view from a Corbett. :D

JOHNGG wrote:As it turned out I had 3 ticks, one for the corbett and two being "passengers" who had hitched a lift and had to be removed the next morning from my leg with a needle, after they had been painted with clear nail varnish to cut off their air supply and kill them.


That's a very inadvisable technique :shock:

Distressing ticks this way apparently can cause them to disgorge their contents back into the host increasing potential transmission of Lyme Disease. Current advice is not to use vaseline, cigarettes, alcohol etc etc. Just get a tick tool or tweezers and pull them out. [/medic] :)
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kinley
 
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Re: Following in Foggie's Footsteps in Fisherfield

Postby JOHNGG » Mon Aug 01, 2011 8:42 pm

Thanks for the warning about tick removal. I was advised that the varnish made the ticks easier to remove and they seemed to come off easily enough. The ones I removed were so small I doubt a tick remover would have worked. Thankfully they hadn't been feasting on me too long but it makes you think. I'm still scratching the cleg bites from last week as well so I think it will be long breeks for me from now on - bang goes my chances of getting a decent tan now .....
JOHNGG
 
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