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Cramond and the Forth Shore

Cramond and the Forth Shore


Postby morag1 » Tue Aug 16, 2011 11:11 pm

Route description: Dalmeny Estate: Queensferry to Cramond Brig

Date walked: 16/08/2011

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This has been a golden summer for me because I have taken every opportunity to get out walking or cycling in the sunshine. I have really enjoyed spending time along the various walkways, cycle paths and the beach near my home. When I looked at a map of Edinburgh I realised I could draw a line connecting all the places I have spent time, and this line covered a large chunk of the Forth shore, with a small loop around Cramond and the Cammo Estate. I have cycled this route several times with my husband, but I have also walked most of it, sometimes by myself and sometimes my son and daughter came with me.

I have divided the route into four sections and I have tried to show photographs that give an impression of the beauty and tranquility of these areas where I spend much of my time.


1. Granton Harbour to Cramond

In recent years the Harbour area has undergone huge redevelopment, and the resulting walkways and cycle paths are a real joy. There are miles of them around the harbour and the area is relatively traffic-free. A beautiful walkway has been constructed along a promontory at Platinum Point that takes you from the old lighthouse at Granton into the middle of the River Forth.
I saw seals in the water when i was walking here but did not manage to get a photo of them.

Platinum Point at sunset, looking down the river to the Forth Bridges
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The Royal Yacht Britannia is docked at Granton.
I have never been on board for some reason :shifty: maybe one day when Ive got nothing better to do
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Once you leave Platinum Point there is a nice walk along the shore past the old fishing village of Newhaven till you reach Granton Square. From there the road to Silverknowes beach goes through an industrial estate for about a mile, not a very nice walk but it is well worth it once you reach Silverknowes Promenade. This is the start of a beautiful mile long promenade, very popular with joggers, cyclists, runners and roller bladers. On Sundays it is chock full of families enjoying a day out. If crowds are not your thing then best get here early in the morning when it is quiet. From the roundabout on Marine Drive you can then link up to the walk on this website - Cramond Island and River Almond Circular. I have not walked across to Cramond Island this year in spite of living close by. I must try to get out at least once before the winter sets in.

The beach at Cramond when the tide is out
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Cramond Island, seen from Silverknowes Promenade
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Lots of families come here to feed the ducks and swans
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The River Almond
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Cramond Falls
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Shetland pony at Cramond Brig
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The Brambles are beginning to fruit
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2. Cammo Estate

This peaceful and tranquil spot is a haven for wildlife with beautiful fauna and flora. It is the remains of an estate designed and planted around 1710 and contains five of the oldest trees in Edinburgh, plus an ancient stone which was once part of a stone circle. Cammo House is now in ruins but it was once Edinburgh's grandest address and the estate was a playground for the aristocracy. Strangely for such a peaceful place, the estate has a troubled history, and there have long been rumours and stories of dark goings-on here. Robert Louis Stevenson described Cammo House as the evil House of Shaws in his novel "Kidnapped", and the main character in the story, David Balfour, was the heir to the Cammo Estate.

Map of Cammo
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An Oak tree dating from 1810
No this photo is not upside down, the tree really is growing horizontal!
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Wee bird in the tree, dont know what it was
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This is all that remains of the once grand Cammo House.
The front door faces directly onto the Pentland Hills
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Stone carvings on the wall adjacent to the house
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The canal may have been designed by Robert Adam. In spring it is full of tadpoles and frog spawn.
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Some of the exotic trees growing on the estate
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A weeping willow dating from 1800
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The walled garden was built to provide fruit and vegetables for the owners of the house
These holes were built to allow bees to enter the garden and pollinate the flowers
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Apple Tree
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I think these are cranberries
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This was a water tower which originally had a windmill attached. When it turned it pumped water into Cammo House.
Some people say the hill behind it is the remains of an iron-age fort, but others say it is a fairy-hill, built by the farmer to appease the fairies and keep them off his land
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The building seen behind the Tower looks very grand but this was the Stables block.
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3. Dalmeny Estate and The Shore Walk

This is a reverse of the walk described on this website. Hubby and I often cycle this route in summer, from Cramond Brig to South Queensferry and back. In winter we take the bus to the Ferry and walk all the way back. It is a beautiful walk past miles of golden beach. The Ferry end is very busy with walkers but they dont seem to do the whole route as we never see any by the time we get to Cramond Brig. Its a shame because the whole route is well worth completing.

The start of the road which takes you onto the Estate
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The Pentland Hills seen from the path to the shore
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There are several burns and waterfalls along the way
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The beautiful beach leading to Cramond Island.
It is possible to walk all the way across to the island but you will need to check the tide times carefully
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Dalmeny House
The walk passes directly in front of the house with its views over Fife
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The oil refinery, where North Sea Oil is piped ashore then taken to Grangemouth for processing
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The Forth Bridge
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4. The Forth Road Bridge

This has long been a favourite walk or cycle of ours. It is best done on a summers day as the winds on the bridge can be really strong. Once you get to the middle section you will be surprised how strong the vibrations are, the pavement beneath your feet shakes and wobbles about as the cars and lorries pass. It takes about 40minutes to cross the bridge on foot, about 10minutes by bike. Everyone should walk over the Forth Road Bridge at least once in their life :D .


You can access the road to the bridge from Dalmeny Estate
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Field of wheat growing on the Estate
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The Forth Road Bridge
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Hubby just couldnt wait to get cycling on the bridge, that's him in the yellow Tshirt disappearing into the distance :roll:
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Yachts sailing on the Forth, seen from the bridge
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Port Edgar Marina.
My son goes sailing here.
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The Ochil Hills, seen behind Rosyth Dockyard
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These juniper berries were growing at the side of the bridge, only a few feet from the traffic
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I have enjoyed walking the shores of the River Forth very much and I plan to continue this by paying a visit to nearby Hopetoun House and walking from there to Blackness Castle then linking up with the Blackness to Carriden walk described on this website.
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Last edited by morag1 on Fri Jun 15, 2012 6:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Cramond and the Forth Shore

Postby morag1 » Sun Aug 21, 2011 8:51 pm

Cramond and the Forth Shore
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Re: Cramond and the Forth Shore

Postby JTweedie » Sun Aug 21, 2011 10:10 pm

I must say, it's not the best setting for the Royal Yacht. A ship of that quality could do with better surroundings!

Oh, and just to add, the wee bird is a Chaffinch.
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Re: Cramond and the Forth Shore

Postby alfredo143 » Mon Aug 22, 2011 11:23 am

Nice photos Morag. Need to try that walk. :)
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Re: Cramond and the Forth Shore

Postby gammy leg walker » Mon Aug 22, 2011 11:41 am

Very fine and informative TR Morag1,dont stay too far away from this area,will maybe walk this way during winter.
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Re: Cramond and the Forth Shore

Postby morag1 » Mon Aug 22, 2011 3:56 pm

JTweedie wrote:A ship of that quality could do with better surroundings!

Have always thought the same JT, dont know why it ended its days in Edinburgh when it was built in Glasgow :?

Thanks for the ID of the chaffinch, i find it hard to identify birds :)


alfredo143 wrote:Nice photos Morag. Need to try that walk.

Cheers Alfredo think you should try it, especially the shore walk from South Queensferry to Cramond, its a real treat :D


gammy leg walker wrote:will maybe walk this way during winter

Definitely Gammy, its a great walk winter or summer, the views of the beach across to Fife are well worth seeing :D
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Re: Cramond and the Forth Shore

Postby ndhudson » Mon Aug 22, 2011 4:11 pm

A fine walk and fine photos too! I've walked across the Skye bridge, if that counts? ;) :lol: :lol:
I wish I had a beach to walk along so close to home. :mrgreen:

Cheers Morag!
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Re: Cramond and the Forth Shore

Postby morag1 » Mon Aug 22, 2011 4:21 pm

Thanks for the comments Nicole :D

Em, yes I think the Skye Bridge counts so you dont need to do the Forth one although it is a great walk :lol:

I just love the beach, always makes me feel good to walk there

:wave:
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Re: Cramond and the Forth Shore

Postby Caberfeidh » Mon Aug 22, 2011 4:40 pm

morag1 wrote:I just love the beach, always makes me feel good to walk there



Careful though - I'm sure that was the beach where lots of unexploded artillery shells are found, from an old practice range. :shock:
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Re: Cramond and the Forth Shore

Postby morag1 » Mon Aug 22, 2011 5:09 pm

Its Cramond beach where i walk and there has never been a practice range there, you must be thinking of someplace else
:crazy:
Last edited by morag1 on Tue Aug 23, 2011 10:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Cramond and the Forth Shore

Postby steven671 » Tue Aug 23, 2011 9:02 pm

great walk and pic`s Morag,i live next to the forth close by,was that oak tree not a willow :? that wee bird is a female chaffinch and the berries were red currant`s just like black current`s,it is a good walk though,not done it all,just bit`s here and there.

all the best to you
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Re: Cramond and the Forth Shore

Postby Malckyb » Tue Aug 23, 2011 9:46 pm

Great report and pics.South Queensferry is one of my fave places ever.I'm hoping to walk the forth bridge soon. Well done...nice walks dont always need to be thousands of feet up!! :)
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Re: Cramond and the Forth Shore

Postby morag1 » Tue Aug 23, 2011 10:49 pm

steven671 wrote:was that oak tree not a willow

Hi steven, to be honest I dont know :oops: I just assumed it was oak as i found it in a place called oak avenue :lol: but I suppose some willow trees might have been planted there too. Must check.

Thanks for the ID of the chaffinch but I am amazed you can tell its female. Think you're right about the red currents, its too early in the year for cranberries.

Nice to hear you enjoy walking the Forth too, all the best to you as well



Malckyb wrote:nice walks dont always need to be thousands of feet up!!

Hi Malky I agree with you there.
Glad you like south queensferry, its a beautiful place and I hope you enjoy your walk across the bridge. The Hawes Inn is a nice place to chill out after the walk :wink:
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Re: Cramond and the Forth Shore

Postby alfredo143 » Thu Feb 23, 2012 3:10 pm

Hi Morag, just to let you know I did the South Queensferry to Crammond part of the walk.on Sunday. :) I found it to be a relaxing and beautiful walk. A big hand to you for posting. :clap:
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Re: Cramond and the Forth Shore

Postby fraochydug » Thu Feb 23, 2012 3:54 pm

a nice walk. before the SWT moved to Leith St. and then to Inverness, they were based in Cramond House. i used to go there once every week or so to write up survey records. the Island has a fair amount of wildlife on it, among the WWII bunkers and broken bottles. a good place to watch foxes.
the "cranberries" look to be redcurrants, and the "junipers" are Burburus - dont put them in your gin!
i love the first photo
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