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Creag a'Chliabhain & Beinn Mheadhoin - pt.3

Creag a'Chliabhain & Beinn Mheadhoin - pt.3


Postby Norman_Grieve » Wed Dec 21, 2011 7:17 pm

Sub 2000' hills included on this walk: Beinn Mheadhoin (Dunmaglass), Creag a'Chliabhain

Date walked: 21/12/2011

Time taken: 8.33 hours

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Cycled doon tae the bus station back o' 4.30 am tae catch the 10X 5.05am bus tae the HC, only to note with some disquiet that the name o' the square in Keith where I'd had tae change buses on the many times I'd caught it this year didnae appear on the electronic timetable. Sure enough it didnae appear and I soon saw that the 1st bus was noo nae 'til 7.50am, nearly 3hr later.

Thus a change o' plan was clearly called for but as the 4.40am 1st bus tae Glasgie had also nae lang left, wi nane more in the offing for an hour or so, I thought I'd hiv tae bite the bullet & put ma haund in ma pocket for a nae doubt exorbitant train ticket. The next wan wasnae 'til 6.15am or thereabouts so ah whiled awa the time by gang up & doon in the lift and wheelin' ma faithful steed alang the very lang but very wrang platform, before finally findin' the right wan.

Ah then txt TP tae tell him o' the change o' plan, having earlier teld him ah wiz gang tae wait 4 the 7.50am but it soon transpired that he weren't gonna mak it. Having eventually mosied on doon tae the right platform, through the open ticket barriers & parked ma butt on the wan set o' uncomfortable, cold steel seats I rested ma eyes, as a wee trickle o' early punters started tae appear. Wan o' them, dressed in jeans and trainers, with a lang straggly beard, reminded moi o' an emaciated store Santa applicant, who wiz pr'obly nae gonna get the job.

The train had bin sittin' at the platform since I arrived with the doors firmly locked shut but when ah next opened ma eyes all the punters had disappeared & a quick glance at ma nae too trusty mob. revealed that it were noo perilously close tae the off. I climbed aboard, lifting up & tethering ma steed, then txt a final 2 min. warning tae TP that he were cuttin' it fine.

Moments later we were off and a few mins. later, having failed miserably tae dodge the comely young conductress I forced a tired smile as I dusted orf ma wallet & attempted tae extract the princely sum of 25 quid! I then lay back across the seats wi ma heid on a makeshift pillow, trying to convince mesel' that it were only a nightmare. I tried and failed tae remember hoo much it had cost the last time I'd taken this train 26 years earlier back in Aug. 1985 on ma way tae a wet week's wild camping nr. Camban wi ma ex-wife.

After climbing steadily and twisting roound & betwixt the wee foothills we arrived at Keith after an hour and a half, in a far slower time than the 10X bus, which only used tae tak an hour, as it bypassed everywhere en-route. Given that we'd also set off an hour later than the auld bus used tae, ah thought it were as well I wasnae hoping tae catch the bus tae the Fort fae the HC.

A doctorly type had got on at Huntly, perhaps on his way tae Grays Hospital at Elgin where he got off, although I dinnae remember rousing mesel' fae ma slumbers tae engage in conversation. Light began tae dawn as we raced across the flat Moray coastal strip, covering the 2nd half o' the journey tae the HC in less than half the time o' the bus, tae arrive only 10 crucial [for onward Fort bus connection], mins after it.

Glancing at ma auld, battered Nokia I saw that TP had noo cast a curse on ma, the spell deemin' that ah wiz gonna brek a leg an' hiv' a lang crawl back tae civilization... Bearing this in mind I alighted into the cool late autumn early morning sunshine at the HC at 8.41am precisely, bang on time, which had looked rather unlikely back at Keith.

I weaved my way through the end o' the rush hour traffic in the semi-pedestrianised city centre of the HC, soon passing Auld McD's where I just managed tae avoid the dubious greasy temptations within. Climbing up the hill, then turning obliquely right I passed swiftly back doon behind the castle, tae reach the lang fast straight above the lower River Ness, with it's wee islands and foot bridges, along which ran the start of the Great Glen Way.

Nae lang past a sign pointing left to a TA Centre, I turned left up a steep climb up a twisting hill, on a road signposted tae Essich. This led after anither mile oot o' the HC, roound a newish roundaboot & expanding housing estate. Shortly beyond the last hooses I reached a wee metal plaque on the left, where I'd hoped tae see the Knocknagael Pictish Boar symbol stane. Hooever, yon plaque stated that this had been moved into the foyer o' the council HQ for the edification o' yon councillors...

I then passed a right turn leading back doon tae the river, via Torbreck, beyond which I started tae climb once more, just aboot coping with the steepening gradient over the other side o' the imaginatively named 'Big Burn'. However, I finally had to get orf & push my labouring steed up through the scattered dwellings of Essich, the steep, narrow lane closely hugging the bank o' the slightly less big burn [actually Essich Burn].

Just past here I got back in the saddle and turned left off General Wade's Military Road, up past an extensive, nearly finished electricity station, complete with numerous large steel transformers & pylons. There were several hi-vis bods standing around just inside the large, muddy yard at the entrance, soon joined by another in a truck which thundered past moi.

There was a fine view looking back the way I'd come over the HC, resplendent in the bright morning sunshine but as this was slightly marred by the unsightly industrial foreground, I held off taking my 1st TR snap with Wee Norma's new digital camera. The going levelled oot past a broad leaved wood on the left, passing a smaller wee mixed woodland on the right and thence back o'er the swollen Allt Mor [sounds a bit better in gaelic], flowing doon fae the sizeable Loch Ashie.

I then started to notice the cool fair breeze as I continue to climb gently up between the extensive plantations, gradually closing in on either side, a roadside estate agent's notice suggesting that I might like to buy some... Having already scaled almost the height of Brimmond Hill, at a height of over 800ft, the views opened up over to the sub2k Marilyn of Meall Mor, just across the A9, which I'd scaled a little over a year earlier with Norma. I snapped this with the distant snowy Graham, Carn nan Tri-tighearnan beyond to it's left, Loch Bunachton just visible doon over the green fields dropping down below.

Soon after I passed over the col between steep, craggy wee Creag a' Chlachain to the right and densely wooded Creag Shoilleir on my left. There followed a steep, twisty drop of 200ft doon tae Dunlichity, which with minimal brakes on my new [to me], steed was rather hairy, fortunately my prayers that I not meet a vehicle coming the other way being answered, at least 'til I'd managed somehow tae slow doon just afore the junction at the foot o' the hill.

After turning right at the 'T' junction, I then turned sharp left again, passing the entrance tae Dunlichity Lodge, where I took my 2nd snap looking back tae possibly the most lichenous crags I've ever climbed on [together with the only other rival candidate, for that title, Raven Crag nr. Strathpeffer]. Beyond a short, steep climb through scattered roadside sheep, I then rounded the steep, craggy wee hill of Creag Bhuidhe, the twisting, narrow lanie then straightening out for the last mile or so to cross a bridge over the River Nairn just beyond the large Brin House on the right.

It had now clouded over and there were a few spots of rain blown in the strenthening breeze, as I snapped the impressive overhanging prow of Brin Rock just upstream. Although I knew most of the climbs here were too hard for the likes o' moi, I'd always meant tae 'go and hae a look', at a mere 'Severe', which took the easiest way up a hanging rampline.

I then turned right along the B851 and laboured in a stiff headwind as I followed the wider road SW, following the course of the River Nairn up the strath, to pass the smart sprawling low stane buildings of The Steadings hotel & restaurant after a mile or so on the right. Not far beyond I passed the minor road leading off right to Loch Ruthven, fae whence I'd come last February, after climbing the neighbouring sub2k Marilyns of Stac Gorm & Stac na Cathaig.

Here I had the satisfaction of overtaking a line o' cars impatiently waiting behind a long trailer, fae which a large flock o' sheep was being persuaded tae exit. There was just enough room for me to pass the end o' the trailer on the inside and a 100 yds or so beyond it I looked back over ma shoulder tae see that the last o' the flock was just running doon the trailer's ramp & out into the field.

After passing through the wee settlements o' East & West Croachy, recently enlarged with several large new wealthy commuters' properties, I then snapped the delightful smooth Tynrich slab climbs of Stac an Eich, the lower ENE ridge of Stac Gorm, seen across the flat sunlit fields around the river, recalling several memorable visits many years ago. The long, narrow Tynrich farm, appeared to be derelict, perhaps providing a wee doss for prospective suitors o' the nearby climbs?

Crossing over the infant River Nairn another mile or so doon the road, I then passed Aberarder House on the right, looking forward tae some shelter fae the forest shown ahead on ma very auld, very tatty map. However, this had been largely felled and I continued to labour over the last mile or so, round to the right, being glad of a wee fall down to the bridge over the River Farigaig. It had taken 3hr tae reach this point and the first hill was still a few miles awa, up the track on the left to Dunmaglass Lodge, just beyond a minor road leading off right to Torness.

A large bird o' prey wheeled around above the river over to my left, as I ground my way up a wee steep stretch just afore some stane estate cottages. A guy went racing past the other way on a large quad bike, then a landrover overtook ma, the guy stopping at his cottage on the left & giving me a wave as I sped by. Not far beyond the last cottage there was a fork, a sign directing walkers [& cyclists], doon tae the left, alongside the river, onto a narrower, more bumpy track than that which carried on to the lodge.

I soon crossed a stream, which was flowing at a high level and seeing a track fording the river to the left, I thought the bridge marked on my ancient map had been washed way, which would have posed a problem, given the swollen river level. However, I carried on past another left fork where there was a bridge, having decided to press on up the glen on the far, south side of Beinn Mheadhoin, the snow-capped north ridge of which was by now close at hand to my left.

Not far beyond a better track coming down through the trees from the lodge up on my right, I finally crossed the river on a larger bridge, complete with newly surfaced track. I finally dismounted not far over the other side, as the steepening track curved gently leftwards around the west, then southern slopes of the hill. I was dissuaded from striking up the hill to the left earlier by a steep, craggy bank below a thin strip of mixed woodland.

I paused tae take a pic looking back down over the rushing waters of the Allt Uisg an t-Sidhein, running down between banks strewn with smooth pale granite boulders, surrounded by spiky russet tangles of dead bracken. This was backed by the cream round tower of 'The Folly', part of a smart large pile, nestling up in the woods overlooking the head of Loch Conagleann.

The angle steepened further as I wheeled mein steed away from the large stream, up above a wee tributary, where the gradient lay back above a turn off to the right following the true right bank of the Allt Uisg an t-Sidhein. I stayed left and carried on up to the Glac nan Gamhna, the col with the Allt Cailtidh, the other main tributary of the River Farigaig. Here I finally abandoned my faithful steed at over 1300ft, leaving a climb of just 500ft to the summit.

I cut up between dripping peat banks, up very soggy grass, trying to keep out of the main flow of a wee stream trickling down between them. I had aquired a pair of nearly new Timberland boots, which I was sure would not be waterproof but was intent on keeping my feet as dry as I could, given that I hadnae bothered with my usual trainers tae change in/out of.

I skirted round the right side of the worst of the boggy ground above, which became steadily drier and more heathery, as the slope steepened, as I gained height towards the SE ridge. Looking back down below to the left I was surprised to see a wee procession of 3 vehicles, including a white van, approaching the junction above the Allt Uisg an t-Sidhein. I was even more amazed to see that they then all turned left up the track which climbed up towards the snows of Beinn Dubhcharaidh.

I then spotted a solitary huge windmill sited on it's SE top at well over 2000ft, thus assumed that they must be intent on working on yet another dodgy wind farm. I thought there must be a good chance that they'd get stuck in the snow before they got very far and indeed I never saw any further trace of them. I soon hit a wee path on the crest of the SE ridge, which eased progress still further up it's moderate incline.

However, a gale was now blowing and I became concerned that the very tatty, ancient map, which I'd stuffed up the front of my jumper, might get sucked out. Very soon after this thought had struck me, the theory became practice and as it flew away over the right side of the ridge, I thought it had gone for good. However, I then saw it land and stick & began to hurry towards it afore it took off again. Alas, my efforts soon became hampered by a deepish snowbank and as I got within yards, it took off once more, to disappear over the steep, craggy slopes of the NE face above the Allt Cailtidh, never tae be seen agin.

Regretfully, I turned back left to regain the crest of the broadening ridge, along which the summit cairn soon appeared.
This was nae tae be the end o' ma troubles however, as my [too], wee, [too], loose fitting woollen hat then blew orf intae a wee half frozen pool o' water and I stuffed the sopping cap into ma pocket. Approaching this wee pile o' stanes, I then realised that I'd left Wee Norma's new digital camera in my rucksack, back doon by moi steed, having just stuffed some dry roasted peanuts & chocolate raisins into ma pockets, carrying a bottle o' juice in ma haund, tae save weight during the ascent.

Glancing at ma battered auld mobile I saw that it had taken 4hr fae Inverness rail station, the time now being 1/4 tae wan, of which only the last 20 mins had been the climb fae the col. By way of variation I decided tae drop straight doon the SW face to gain the track above it's steepest section below the junction.

This proved far more straightforward than anticipated from the view from the track had suggested fae below, evidently I must've hit a wide gap between the wee crags & stony slopes at either hand, more by luck than judgement. I disturbed a few grouse, which flew off fae close at hand, squawking their customary loud protests and spotted a few Red Deer strolling off below, in rather less haste to escape my clutches.

The short, steepish section was soon descended on short, springy heather and the angle continued to lay back, as I crossed rather less wet, grassy slopes, to reach the top of a rather higher soggy bank of peat & gravel, than threaded on my ROA. Part of this collapsed under my not inconsiderable weight, as I slithered doon the top section & then jumped into the muddy tallus slope below.

A few minutes walk then took me back up the track to the col, where I was relieved to see that my pack lay undisturbed, alongside mein faithful untethered steed. There followed another of those trademark, very hairy, almost uncontrolled breakneck descents, on account o' the minimal braking capabilities o' mein steed. The dodgiest bit o' this was mayhap where I suddenly recalled that I had to pass through a sturdy steel gate near the foot of the descent, not far above the river.

Fortunately I managed tae slow doon a tad, enough to allow moi tae turn off onto an handy stretch of improved soft, only slightly bumpy grass to the right of the gate. Disaster narrowly averted I then slid back the catch, swung the offending heavy metal gate open, wheeled through mein steed, closed the barrier behind moi and continued calmly on ma merry way doon what little remained o' the descent doon tae the bridge.

Not long after the sharp right turn back over the far side I turned obliquely left up the better track, over another wee bridge over the Allt Achaidh a' Chaib Reidh, thence up through the woods to join the main track back doon the glen, just before Dunmaglass Lodge. I passed in front of the main entrance of this imposing grey granite edifice [late Victorian?], then swung back left to recross the aforementioned stream. A gentle rise up through the woods then took me to the drive branching off up right to The Folly, where I once again abandoned my steed and pack, from which this time I remembered to remove Wee Norma's camera.

I used this to take shots up the wild Conagleann, to which the foreground of carefully tended shrubs appeared in stark contrast and also back over to Beinn Mheadhoin, from whence I'd just come. I then made my way through the trees from behind the lodge, fortunately soon arriving at a gate in the deer fence at the forest edge, after a short, soft stroll, with much deep, spongy moss. Even more luckily, it turned out that there was the remains of a track leading off fae the gate through the otherwise deep heather.

This track, at first no more than deep wheel ruts, seemed to improve somewhat, as it climbed gently up, angling rightwards over towards the long named, aforementioned, already twice crossed stream. Once joined, this led up a long, narrow, wet strip of grass through the heather, where I finally had my suspicions about the waterproof [or lack of], properties o' ma newish boots confirmed.

Had I not been so far fae my starting point, with limited daylight remaining, it noo being 2pm, I would have moved left over to join the ridge beyond which the steep, craggy hillside fell sharply doon into narrow Loch Conagleann. However, this remained hidden from me by a low ridge as I gained height easily, on the almost continuous but in places faint, grassy track.

One or twa Mountain Hares, in intermediate pale grey fur, not yet in full white winter splendour, loped off lazily awa fae moi, as I passed between wee rocky forepeaks higher up. The angle remained pretty gentle all the way up to a wee col, beyond which the grassy track dropped doon tae follow the left side of a soft, flat, wet plateau, stretching back right towards the northern top Meall Donn.

After an ill advised wee detour to the right, to seek drier going but rather finding even wetter, deeper bog, I then turned back left to regain the end o' the fainter, wetter, grassy wee track. This petered oot as I reached a wee iron fence, over which a wee steepening heather slope led to a wee nose, which proved tough going in the deep heather, more than half covered with a lattice-work o' soft wee snow patches. I traversed right to the crest where I hit a wee path coming up fae the right, in the direction of the track up Meall Donn fae Farraline, nae doubt the personal car assisted, quick-tick approach.

The wind was noo blowing a hoolie fae the SW, fae which I had 'til now bin sheltered fae the worst, on my gentle NE approach but was noo heading straight intae. Thus I was pleased to see the crowning cairn perched on the summit o' the Marilyn, Creag a' Chliabhain, only a hunnerd yards or so distant. From here, reached at nearly half past twa pm, after a climb o' just 40 mins fae The Folly, there was a fine view over the deep chasm of Conagleann, where I'd ascended a very fine multi-pitch route at only V.Diff., at the 2nd attempt with LF several years ago.

The snows of the steep NW face of Beinn Dubhcharaidh, leading round to the spectacular long defile of An Fail, brought on an urge to revisit the glen and bag some more of it's fine, mainly steep 2 pitch routes. In the opposite direction the distant steep, snowy cone of the Graham Meal Fuar-mhonaidh, appeared over nearby long, narrow Loch Mhor, across hidden Loch Ness. The views back the way I had come to very distant Inverness were now rather dark, with rain clearly already falling in the misty NW.

I texted the remote ferocious supervisor my location, then attempted to hold ma haunds steady for a final shot looking SW over the summit cairn, the blurry results, testament to the strength o' the gale. I then turned to start the lang, lang descent and return tae the fleshpots o' Inverness. In a fairly futile attempt to avoid the worst o' the flat stretch across the high marsh, I kept on the wee summit path 'til I lost it, to the left [going back], o' my ROA.

Across the bog I then crossed over a rocky wee forepeak, then dropped out o' the gale doon it's far side, to largely follow my ROA, 'til lower down where I cut off the wee dogleg in the track to the left [going down]. However, soon decided the much tougher going in the deep heather wasnae worth the wee saving in distance and veered back left above the top of a wee valley dropping down towards the foot of Loch Conagleann.

Back on the vestigial track I soon reached the gate at the forest edge but took a lower line through the woods than my ROA, just spotting The Folly [new Dunmaglass Lodge], through the trees up over to my right before walking down past it.

Back at mein faithful steed at 3pm after just half an hour's descent, I felt in ma pocket for my small scale page o' AA road atlas, which I'd been intending tae consult for an alternate route back tae the HC, by way of variation. However, it appeared that it had gone the way of it's larger scale, more ancient fellow map on Beinn Mheadhoin - twa maps lost on the wan trip, a new personal record. Although I was starting to wonder if a similar pattern was emerging to that back on ma near disastrous trip tae Oban bothy back in the summer, with the entertainment value to my constant reader to the fore, I decided tae have a bash at a different route back anyways.

With a thoosand feet o' descent back doon tae the HC, I was fairly confident I should beat my approach time... barring mishaps or Oban trip like feats of [miss], navigation. Seconds later I was speeding between the park-like path crossing directly between the new lodge & auld, thence keeping left where I'd come up fae the river earlier, after scaling Beinn Mheadhoin. Minutes later I was racing back between the impressive pair of bronze lifesize eagles, wings outstretched atop the large pillars guarding the entrance tae the estate, adjacent tae the gatehoose on the right.

Just past here I made my 1st faux pas, keeping left at the branch on the approach to the B851, cursing at the wasted time/distance, when I realised that the wee minor road turning off left beside Squiz's expensive phone box, was back to the right. However, I was soon placated by this very minor error, as I whizzed doon toward the river, seeing the B851 climbing high above, which I'd toyed with the idea of taking. Still I wasnae entirely sure where I was going, thinking that the lane would take me round the head of Loch Ruthven. Thus I turned right at a branch by Abersky farm, a mile or so doon the lanie, not having gone far before I found the tarmac turning tae gravel in the near darkness.

Backtracking tae regain the tarmac I then turned right and up a steepish wee hill, where I reached a junction with the B862 where I turned right again, whizzing doon the hill into the wee hamlet o' Torness [not the power station, just a few cottages]. Here a cheery middle-aged wifey, out walking her wee doggie, gave me a friendly wave, not long after which I dismounted to push mein steed up the steepest section of the hill over the far side of the River Farigaig. I still wasnae at all sure I was heading in the right direction, which didn't seem to be getting me any nearer tae Inverness, as the road weaved around up the hillside, towards a line of steep crags.

However, as the road turned right below them, where a wee lanie came in fae the left, things started looking up, with a fast run doon tae Loch Ceo Glais, where the road hugged the water along the NW shore. Following a wee rise beyond it's foot, another fast run took me doon tae the head of large, wide Loch Duntelchaig, the foot o' which had been the scene o' many a memorable climbing trip with LF, just a few years back.

Here I whizzed between the sub2k Marilyns o' Tom Bailgeann & Creag na h-lolaire, scaled on a trip over a year earlier, the former with Norma. Not far beyond the wee lanie turning off back right tae Loch Ruthven, I again dismounted briefly at a steep wee hill, before turning right along General Wade's road across Ashie Moor. Here both ways were signposted 10 miles tae the HC but having pushed ma steed up much of the lang, steep hill fae Dores the previous February, I didn't fancy my chances o' surviving the descent with nae brakes.

I cast a dark look over tae my right at the junction, in the direction of the wee knoll where I'd managed tae sprain my ankle on the gentle descent [in trainers], fae having a look at the wee conglomerate climbs on it's SE flank - when on the way back fae a climbing trip with LF [something I'd never done in all my Munro/Corbett/Graham/Alpine 4000'ers].

The wee road proved to be a good choice, pretty straight, with just a gentle wee climb before the crossroads with the wee lanie coming over fae Dunlichty, passing along the head o' Loch Alshie & foot o' Loch Duntelchaig en-route. There was another wee rise beyond up to the crest o' the long gentle ridge along the top of Drumashie Moor, then things speeded up once more in the gathering gloom and I was glad of my newly purchased 150 lumens headtorch [only 8 quid tae Yours Truly].

However, at the junction with ma ROA coming in fae the right above Essich, I first had tae wait fae a large tanker coming the other way, which showed nae sign o' stopping on the narrow lanie and then was forced tae a halt by a white van coming fae behind, who was evidently less than impressed with my lack o' rear light lumens. He then raced off shouting back 'what do ye think ye're playing at?', ringing in ma ears...

I just managed tae negotiate the steep descent back doon tae the site o' the sadly misappropriated Knocknagael Pictish Boar stane, narrowly avoiding a trip intae the nearside ditch, when encountering an oncoming vehicle on the steepest, windiest section. Thereafter the HC streetlights were a welcome bonus, as the long threatened rain started tae fall, accompanied by a rising gale.

Back at the bus station at 5.05pm [not wishing tae hae ma wallet raided fae anither 25 quid fae the train], I then found I'd got a wait of over an hour 'til the next #10 back tae the GC. This wasnae too much o' a bain, as I soon found a nice comfy seat in the nice warm waiting room, where I was entertained by a bonnie teenaged lass. The last challenge was tae sneak ma steel hoss ontae yon bus, which was soon greeted by anither challenge fae yon bus driver, who looking directly at moi uttered the words 'Who's put that bike in ma bus?"...
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Last edited by Norman_Grieve on Wed Dec 28, 2011 1:34 pm, edited 12 times in total.
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Re: Creag a'Chliabhain & Beinn Mheadhoin - pt2

Postby HighlandSC » Wed Dec 21, 2011 8:53 pm

Blimey Norman. Makes me glad I've got a motor car to get to the hills.

Good job you didn't argue with the conductress on the train. Big man may have got you
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Re: Creag a'Chliabhain & Beinn Mheadhoin - pt2

Postby mrssanta » Wed Dec 21, 2011 11:25 pm

Great Map Norman, looks like a smashing walk/cycle from Inverness to these two hills
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Re: Creag a'Chliabhain & Beinn Mheadhoin - pt2

Postby Norman_Grieve » Fri Dec 23, 2011 10:46 am

mrssanta wrote:Great Map Norman, looks like a smashing walk/cycle from Inverness to these two hills


MissSanta, ta for the help - ah've noo attached both maps tae this post so will delete the original post forthwith.

I have also noo extended the TR, so's we are now half way to the 1st hill. :wink:

P.S. As a special crimbo pressie just 4u, ah'm just awa tae post me Tiso's prizewinning TR, which hath already had nearly 3k hits on anither [inferior], hillbashing site. :shock:

P.P.S. If any bright spark kens hoo tae join/merge the 2 gpx files together to give just the wan grand tour, be my guest.
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Re: Creag a'Chliabhain & Beinn Mheadhoin - pt2

Postby malky_c » Fri Dec 23, 2011 5:02 pm

Ah now we're moving. You've kept us waiting for this one! So far you appear to have taken a slightly different route to mine, but not much. I don't think you can join 2 gpx files together, but you should be able to draw the whole route in one. The plotter tends to get a bit slow with long routes like this though.
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Re: Creag a'Chliabhain & Beinn Mheadhoin - pt2

Postby Norman_Grieve » Sat Dec 24, 2011 9:52 am

malky_c wrote:Ah now we're moving. You've kept us waiting for this one!

Aye, weil, ye're obviously nae paying ma enuf - Time's £££ and it's costin' moi a shedload for each hour that goes by without adding tae the paltry 38 pages o' ma book so far completed...


So far you appear to have taken a slightly different route to mine, but not much. I don't think you can join 2 gpx files together, but you should be able to draw the whole route in one. The plotter tends to get a bit slow with long routes like this though.


Having already wasted 1hr, the phrase 'once bitten...', springs tae mind. :(
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Re: Creag a'Chliabhain & Beinn Mheadhoin - pt2

Postby mrssanta » Sat Dec 24, 2011 11:39 pm

's looking good, the trip to Inverness had me exhausted already!
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Re: Creag a'Chliabhain & Beinn Mheadhoin - pt2

Postby Norman_Grieve » Mon Dec 26, 2011 11:15 am

mrssanta wrote:'s looking good, the trip to Inverness had me exhausted already!


Aye, ye look pretty good too doll, herebe yon photies. Hope you have had a wonderful crimbo without me. :wink:

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Re: Creag a'Chliabhain & Beinn Mheadhoin - pt.3

Postby mrssanta » Tue Dec 27, 2011 9:50 pm

Thanks Norman, had a lovely Christmas, turkey and skirlie and yorkshire puds, bit of mixed culture, nothing like it
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That's alles mein volk!

Postby Norman_Grieve » Wed Dec 28, 2011 1:38 pm

mrssanta wrote:Thanks Norman, had a lovely Christmas, turkey and skirlie and yorkshire puds, bit of mixed culture, nothing like it


Glad tae hear your crimbo was better than mine Miss New Year.

P.S. That's nearly all folks! :shock:
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Re: Creag a'Chliabhain & Beinn Mheadhoin - pt.3

Postby malky_c » Sun Jan 01, 2012 5:10 pm

I enjoyed the finished article - minus the wind and one of the summits, it reminds me of my trip up there in August.
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Re: Creag a'Chliabhain & Beinn Mheadhoin - pt.3

Postby rocket-ron » Sun Jan 01, 2012 5:55 pm

i enjoyed reading that norman
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Re: Creag a'Chliabhain & Beinn Mheadhoin - pt.3

Postby Norman_Grieve » Wed Jan 04, 2012 7:04 pm

malky_c wrote:I enjoyed the finished article - minus the wind and one of the summits, it reminds me of my trip up there in August.


Cheers Malky, Glad ye liked it. HNY.

I guess there may hae bin a wee bit less o' the white stuff back in August an' all, n'est pas? :wink:
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Re: Creag a'Chliabhain & Beinn Mheadhoin - pt.3

Postby hailiamdigby » Mon Jan 07, 2013 11:04 pm

Did Beinn Mheadhoin & Creag a' Chliabhain on the 6th of January, 2013. Walked in to the Dunmaglass estate from the B851 to do Beinn Mheadhoin but didn't realize until I got back to the car that I actually could have combined this with Creag a' Chliabhain, which was my next one for the day anyway.
Started that one from Farraline and had a good time of it. Turns out I didn't really lose much in the way of time - doing the two separately - and there's great views to the South West, over Loch Mhor.
I guess the reason I'm really posting this at all is to save somebody possibly making the same mistake as me as I would have been keen to see Loch Conagleann. It would be an excuse to do Creag a' Chliabhain a second time though, if I came at it from Dumnaglass, this time. Nice estate that.
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