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Innerdouny & Lendrick & Ben Clach fae Gleneagles station

Innerdouny & Lendrick & Ben Clach fae Gleneagles station


Postby Norman_Grieve » Wed Jan 04, 2012 11:29 am

Sub 2000' hills included on this walk: Ben Clach, Innerdouny Hill, Lendrick Hill

Date walked: 02/01/2012

Time taken: 11 hours

Distance: 95 km

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Scaled Innerdouny & Lendrick Hills & Ben Clach fae Gleneagles station.

The complete TR may be delayed somewhat [what's new], on account o' Wee Norma's digital camera having gone walkabout on christmas eve. :evil:
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Last edited by Norman_Grieve on Mon Jan 30, 2012 11:36 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Innerdouny & Lendrick Hills fae Gleneagles station

Postby Graeme D » Wed Jan 04, 2012 10:51 pm

This I have to see! Fae Gleneagles Station????? All I'm saying is that if it's anything like a previous report fae said station to Steele's Knowe that you posted on another site, it'll be epic! :lol:
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Re: Innerdouny & Lendrick Hills fae Gleneagles station

Postby monty » Wed Jan 04, 2012 11:13 pm

50k in 6 hours Norman. Was that on the train hahaha. Look forward to the report. :D
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Re: Innerdouny & Lendrick Hills fae Gleneagles station

Postby Norman_Grieve » Fri Jan 06, 2012 2:52 pm

Graeme Dewar wrote:This I have to see! Fae Gleneagles Station????? All I'm saying is that if it's anything like a previous report fae said station to Steele's Knowe that you posted on another site, it'll be epic! :lol:


Aye, thanks for bringing that wan tae moi attention, seems like most o' the photos hae disappeared fae the post, will see if I can find time to get them back on, as it's apparently attracted a fair bit o' interest o'er the past year [best part o' 2k hits].

I guess this trip was a wee bit o' an anniversary visit to the area, being nearly a year on. :shock:
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Re: Innerdouny & Lendrick Hills fae Gleneagles station

Postby Norman_Grieve » Sat Jan 07, 2012 1:51 pm

monty wrote:50k in 6 hours Norman. Was that on the train hahaha. Look forward to the report. :D


Monty,

At the risk o' spoiling the TR, a steel hoss was employed for the vast majority o' this trip, not confined tae all the snowy tarmac - me knees wouldnae stand 30 odd miles on a hard surface. :o
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Re: Innerdouny & Lendrick Hills fae Gleneagles station

Postby Norman_Grieve » Tue Jan 10, 2012 12:04 pm

A leisurely start saw me heading doon tae the station, where I found the 1st Glasgie bound train o' the New Year was 10 mins earlier than I'd thought & crowds o' folk were already milling around behind the barriers. After trying ma ticket a couple o' times & getting it ejected without the barriers opening, a helpful hi-vis clad railway lassie advanced towards moi & patiently explained that the reason all the folks were queueing was 'cos the platform hadnae been announced yet, thus the barriers wouldnae let anywan thru'

Moments later there was a surge for the turnstiles as evidently the platform had been decided upon, unsurprisingly being that beside the line heading south. Rather more unexpectedly I managed tae tether ma steed aboard and was still in time tae grab a S. facing seat just opposite, unlike plenty o' other folk. It soon transpired that the train was packed with Airberdin FC supporters who were heading tae the game with fellow auld New Firmers, Dundee Utd. Thus, Hogmanay having been nae lang passed, the conversation o' those around moi consisted largely aboot having quaffed copious amounts o' the amber nectar.

Having left slightly late at back o' half nine, an announcement apologised both for this & the state o' the train, which the voice over said was less than ideal, on account o' the New Year's Day holiday. At each of the 5 stations stopped at on the way tae Dundee, virtually naebody got off but plenty got on, resulting in folks being crammed in like sardines and I began tae wonder hoo I was gonna get ma bike off.

A further announcement then apologised for the overcrowding, which the voice said was inconveniencing some travellers and was due tae both the sunday service & the short length o' the train, as they couldnae hiv more, on account o' the limited no. o' carraiges which could fit along the restricted length of the platforms at some of the stations we were stopping at... A wee young voice then piped up close by asking 'What does he mean only some'?

I only wondered what it must be like on match days when the awa game is in Glasgie and breathed a sigh o' relief when most folk got off at Dundee. As we sped up beside the Firth Tay I then noticed that the snaw was well doon on the slopes o' Kings Seat up to the right. Given that the twa hills I was headed for were considerably higher, 15 miles awa fae Gleneagles station, o'er a pass leading tae Glendevon, I began tae have some misgivings, in view o' the forcast heavy snow & gales.

Alighting at the station at 11.30am a mere 2hr after leaving the GC, recalling my fight through the snowy bushes doon the S. end o' the platform almost a year earlier at the start o' my icy conquest of Steele's Knowe, this time I thought I'd try the north end, much tae the bemusement o' the conductor, who confined himself tae a fairly standard greeting through the open train window. He must've wondered where the hell I thought I was going wheeling a bike in the opposite direction to the station exit & overpass.

Finding only an uncompromising barbed wire fence lining the bank above the platform, I thought I'd check for an unnoticed chink in it's armour back towards the station. Finding only the same bushes which I recalled fae my last visit, I again turned back the way I had come, the train fortunately having by now pulled out of the station, otherwise I guess further developments, possibly involving the Transport Polis or men in white coats may hae bin in the offing by this stage?

Conscious of my lack of progress, the limited daylight & over 30 miles tae go, with ma twa snowy hills still well beyond the far horizon, I thought I'd better bite the bullet and without further prevarication, lifted mein steed unceremoniously over the fence into the field the other side. It tipped over and landed with the handlebars sticking into a pool of icy meltwater, surrounded with the soggy remains of wet snow. I followed, precariously balancing on the swaying top strand of barbed wire, then took a flying leap into the squelchy morass below.

I then wheeled my poor steed through the watery grass, following the thickest of the melting snow, not far out fae the fence, past the station below, through a break in another, rather less sturdy fence at right angles tae that running alongside the railway. After a couple of hunnerd yards I slanted left of the corner of the field where I'd climbed yet another fence the previous year, recalling that I'd then spotted a stile crossing over to the track the other side. After heaving my steed over this fence I then used the stile with a certain satisfaction at having saved mesen the wee dogleg doon tae the dual carraigeway, remarkably still having kept ma feet dry, in moi rather less than waterproof Timberland boots.

Although it was still bright, sun lighting up the snowy sides of the steep sided, narrow defile of Glen Eagles, just a couple of miles up ahead, I resisted the temptation to take my 1st snap, knowing that it couldn't match that taken fae the same spot almost a year earlier, on that crystal clear, icy midwinter's day. I followed in my auld footsteps on ma steel hoss, labouring up tae Millhill farm, with it's large modern shed, then used ma boots tae try tae restrict my barely controlled descent beyond a cottage on the left, onto the busy A823.

I then couldnae restrain mesen any longer & gave into the temptation to take a pic looking over tae sunlit, snowy Wether Hill, then turning left up the road, soon crossing a high bridge over the ravine of the Ruthen Water. Across this the hill up the other side soon had me labouring and I dismounted alongside the minor road turning off steeply up to the left. I soon got back in the saddle between large East Mains Farm closeby up to the left and Gleneagles House across the burn well down to the right.

However, the cold headwind seemed to be taking awa both ma breath and energy and I was soon off again, as the angle steepened up going into Glen Wood. This time my use of shanks pony was more lengthy but it wasnae long after I remounted that I was pleasantly surprised tae see Gleneagles Old Toll House & the steep ridge of Hawk's Craig, which I'd ploughed up in deep, soft snow early in 2011. However, as I emerged fae the SSE end o' Glen Wood I was again soon brought to a halt by an even fiercer freezing headwind, slushy wet snow also covering the edge of the road surface.

Hence there were a few more spells of pushing, rather than riding mein steed up the last couple o' hunnerd feet of climbing up the last mile along the foot of the very steep, craggy flanks of East Craigs to the col with Glen Devon, at a height of almost 900ft. Here I relished my chance to make up for lost time, as the road followed a wide left hander doon a fairly gentle descent above the wee Meadow Burn, passing a track leading off right to a fish farm below the reservoirs up Glen Devon. Speeding past Glenhead Farm up on the left I soon closed in beside the very full River Devon, close below the steep flanks of The Law up on the left.

Over the quaintly named Hillkitty Burn and the steep truncated spur of Hillkitty to my left, the road hugged even closer to the River Devon, which was soon joined on my right, by the Glensherup Burn flowing down fae the reservoir of the same name. Here on the left was a large static caravan park, reminiscent of Cowal, backed by Glendevon Castle and still adorned with multi-coloured christmas lights. The valley then took a turn to the right, as I rode past a whitwashed old church on the right, a mile beyond which a track turned off left up Borland Glen beside Glendevon Youth Hostel on the left.

A little further on beyond a wee climb, I entered Glendevon village, complete with a large, smart and busy looking hotel on the left. Around here, at last, I got a glimpse of my first objective Lendrick Hill, which I was pleased to see didn't seem to have as thick a snow cover as the hills through which I'd just passed. A sharp bend to the right then led round to a steep wee descent down to the Blacklinn Bridge, which crossed over the River Devon at the head of Castlehill Reservoir. A final long flat straight section led for a mile along the reservoir, cars flying past at typical high rates of knots, when released fae the otherwise twisty confines of a narrow glen.

Just short of the reservoir's end I dismounted with some relief for my aching hindquarters, after the long run doon the glen, lifting mein steed over a locked gate at the entrance to a wee road leading down tae the dam. This was pretty spectacular with a huge jet of water pluming out below it's 80ft drop, with what appeared to be a steep, foaming fish ladder running down the side. Across the dam there was only a fairly muddy, not particularly well worn path leading up right towards a small plantation. I thought this might well soon lead to a good track, as I could see a farm, well to the left above the reservoir.

This soon proved to be the case and back in the saddle the good level surface led between mostly green fields, the snow having largely melted. Looking back I snapped the distinctive cone of Seamab Hill, then over a wee rise, followed the track sharp right and down a short, steep, perilous [sans brakes], descent to join the B934 across the Glendey Burn, close to the lower corner of a plantation running up almost to the summit of Lendrick Hill.

I turned left up the road, soon reaching a carpark on the right, where there were a couple of cars, each with a couple of bods, who appeared to be in the final stages of getting ready for the off, a shaggy wee dark grey doggie running around between them. Having just pulled on a bright red waterproof, one o' the middle-aged, moustachioed guys nodded an hello to moi, with a slight grimace, as if he mayhap wasnae too impressed with the dark threatening clouds which were closing in.

I dismounted just beyond their shiny new gas guzzlers, pushed mein steed through a gate and began to wheel the beast up round a right hander. The gradient was none too steep and I gained height easily at first, the track being snowless, with the yapping wee doggie soon appearing, running up behind, as I approached a sharp left bend but with no sign of it's owners following. Beyond the bend the snow reappeared and I took another snap looking back down across the mouth of Glen Devon, past the steep snowy nose of Seamab Hill, around which more snow bearing clouds were steadily gathering.

As the track swung in a gentle rightwards arc, passing above a wide forest ride dropping directly back down to the road, large snowflakes began to fall and now above 1000ft, the snow underfoot began to deepen. Still progress was aided by several lines of fresh footprints, indicating that this was a popular walk, being close to the densely populated central belt. I then wound my way up a sharp wee zig-zag, to the right, then back left, soon thereafter reaching a steep, narrow forest ride leading off up right towards the summit, up which led the handy trail of footprints.

I first stashed mein steed close under the densely packed spruce up to the right, then had a long swig of Lidls' Premium Lemonade [39p for 2L], before traversing through the deeper virgin snow, along the foot of the trees to rejoin the snowy trail up the start of the forest ride. This must have been fairly tough going for the trail breakers but was much easier for moi, now unburdened at last with having to push my charge through the white stuff.

After a few hundred feet of steepening going, where I got too hot, having to unzip my inner body warmer, despite the snow, the angle began to lay back beyond the crossing of a wide, snow-filled ditch. As I climbed up the top of the increasingly easy forest ride, the trees rapidly thinned out, leaving only a few scattered dwarves, dotted around the broad ridge crest.

Just a few hundred yards along this a steeper wee nose appeared intermittently through the mist, being just high enough to touch the cloudbase.

As I advanced towards it through an increasing gale, having left the shelter of the higher trees behind, the footprints led through a gap in a wall, a line of deeper snow between the heather indicating the line of a no doubt well worn path beneath. As I made my way up the short, steep nose, a fair sized cairn appeared, which turned out to be the summit, although after several attempts to balance on it's topmost icy block in the gale, I continued on past it, to the clearly lower trig point, thence mounting the OS column, more easily in traditional style.

Back at the summit cairn I sat in the limited shelter of it's leigh side, texting the ferocious supervisor [not], tae advise her o' my whereabouts, the summit having been gained at 1/4 to 2pm, after a climb of 40 mins, following the 1 1/2hr approach fae Gleneagles station. I set off back well to the left [going down], of the path, in order tae attempt tae get a view doon tae the glen as I dropped out of the mist. I also snapped a distant view over the head of the Firth of Forth, with the distinctive tower of Longannet Power station backed by the unlovely spires of Grangemouth Oil Refinery.

I then traversed back through the snowy heather to rejoin my ROA beyond the wee wall and was soon plunging back doon the forest ride. After extricating mein steed fae under the trees at it's foot, I was then glad of the snow on the track, which helped to restrict my speed, as I dragged a foot behind me. Despite this I was relieved to emerge at the carpark beyond the gate unscathed, after what must rank as possibly my fastest ever descent fae summit to the foot of a hill, in just 15 mins.

Thankfully it had stopped snowing but the brief burst had evidently been enough to put off the cushy living loving gas guzzler drivers, who were long gone back tae their no doubt big cosy hooses. A short distance doon the road I passed an impressive such pile, complete with twa shiny new Chelsea tractors parked out front on the more than ample gravel driveway. About a mile up the road I passed the long, straight, narrow, steep, craggy sided defile of Glen Queich running back right, thinking it would make a good walk, with a picnic some sunny day.

Following the increasingly snowy road up close along beside the South Queich burn and past Earnieside farm, I thought back to the previous night's series of programs on Morecambe & Wise, wondering whether there might be an Eric&Ernieside farm somewhere? The road climbed steadily up along the foot of the treeless, snowy slopes of Mellock Hill on the right, a fair bit higher than that which I'd just scaled but not a Marilyn, on account of a drop of less than 300ft on the broad connecting ridge to my next objective, the higher Innerdouny Hill.

Beyond the Lamb Linn waterfall, I then passed an automobile parked at the start of a track on the left, leading up into the dark forest, cloaking the deep valley of the intriguingly named Fanny Burn and Fanny Hill beyond, noting them both a worthy of future close investigation... Just beyond the far edge of the trees clothing the latter, I passed Littlerig cottage, which appeared sadly neglected, the driveway, garage & windows all sporting copious moss and slime, perhaps also worthy of investigation as a potential doss?

Here I halted at a rather smaller carpark than that back at Lendrick Hill, here the covering of snow untouched, hence I was left to break my ain trail up the track which led up behind the sad looking cottage. It soon cut back sharp left, through a large area of felled timber, hence lacking any shelter fae the strengthening wind, accompanied by renewed flurries of large snowflakes. As I pushed my faithful steed ever onwards up through the deepening snow, I soon passed a large forestry handling vehicle on the left, with several piles of timber on the right.

Beyond this the surface became smoother and I even got back in the saddle briefly to ride a level section over the head of Blair's Den. I then had to negotiate a fallen spruce, pushing through the branches blocking the track, fully expecting to damage mein steed in the process but she proven tougher than I'd thought. Beyond a sharp right hander I dismounted once more, as the gradient steepened and the wind blew harder, accompanied by continuous heavy snowfall.

As the track swung back left I reached a fork, where I took the right branch, which soon breasted a rise and I once more got back in the saddle for a snowy wee run back down to a broad col. At the nearside of the col there was a short branch leading off right in the direction of my objective, which I think may have led to an alternative route to the summit. However, conscious of the limited daylight, it now being after 3pm, I pressed on, leading mein steed up the deeper snow lying on the track traversing up towards the trees still standing up ahead.

I was looking forward to getting some shelter from the swirling tempest once I gained the remaining woods but for some distance after passing the first trees the snow bearing gale seemed to blow straight up the tunnel which they formed behind me. However, approaching a widening clearing around the track I climbed back up onto my steed's back for a final windy wee descent to reach the Mid Burn, running down the flank of the rather more imaginatively named Scowling Craig Hill.

Here I backtracked a few yards, then left my steel hoss lying in the snow, as I deserted her for a narrow forest ride, leading up to the wee col between Brunt Hill & my final objective, the elusive Innerdouny. Although this was much easier angled than the forest ride leading to the summit of Lendrick Hill, there were a few wet, mossy, boggy sections and I veered left, just into the edge of the trees half way up seeking drier going.

Hence I just about managed tae keep ma footsies dry, at wan point traversing along the side o' a wee heathery bank, again on the left side of the ride and it wasnae long before I emerged on the wee col. Here I was relieved tae see a much wider forest ride leading up the left side of a snowed up wall, almost at right angles to the left of the ride I'd just ascended. Although there wasnae much sign of any path, which would hae bin snaw filled in any case, it wasnae particularly rough going up the moderate heathery slope. Thus it didnae take lang to reach it's top, at the top l.h. corner o' the forest on the right, where I arrived at a 'T' junction of walls.

Here I was exposed to the full force of the gale and although the snow falling fae the sky had slackened off, the wind was whipping up the spindrift, as I turned right and followed the obvious snowed up path through the heather, which led towards the trig point, gained at 3.25pm. Following the ritual mounting o' the trig column, sans Brucie pose in deference tae the gale, I txt both my Senior & Assistant Safety Officers my position, with an update on the prevailing conditions. As the snowfall had come tae a temporary halt & the top remained below the mist level, I took a few summit photies, including wan back over Lendrick Hill whence I'd come, with Loch Leven o' the Kingdom o' Fife, in the distance to it's left.

Remarkably, a wee vole or large mouse appeared close below the summit cairn and scurried awa fae me down through the snow. If it was a vole it was the first I'd seen since the surreal multitude which I'd encountered on the Isle of Mull back on the 1st day of October, although I'm pretty sure those were larger. Given that much larger rodents such as squirrels hibernate, it seems amazing that such voles can survive out in such conditions, let alone just feet away from the summit of a hill nearly 500m in height!

In view of the 15+ miles back tae the station with mebbe half an hour o' daylight remaining, I then thought I'd better get the h*ll outta there and set off back doon the way I'd come for wance, toute suite. Soon heading back down the narrow forest ride tae the track, I ploughed straight on through the marshy centre, nae bothering with the wee detour off it's true right side o' ma ROA. Back at the snowy track, the return tae the road was nae quite so speedy as fae Lendrick, on account o' the couple o' wee rises, short flat section & the once again successful negotiation of the fallen spruce.

Still it was getting pretty dark by the time I'd folowed the South Queich Water & Glendey Burn back the 3 miles or so down to the shortcut tae Castlehill Reservoir Dam, so I elected just tae carry straight on doon the B934, to it's junction with the A823 near Yetts o' Muckhart, adding over a mile tae the journey. The road followed a narrow, steep sided craggy wee glen alongside first the Glendey Burn, thence the River Devon crossed by a bridge not far below the dam. Even in the gathering darkness it was easy to see why the direttissema up the west face of Lendrick Hill, had so far repelled all potential assailants, including the great Lindsay B.

Over the bridge there was a climb of nearly 100ft, where I had a wee breather approaching the junction, as I put on my new 150 lumens Silverpoint headtorch, having given mine tae Wee Norman on christmas day, when the wan I'd bought him proved to be defective. Turning right along the A823, following a further wee climb, there was some relief as a gentle descent took me back to the long straight above the reservoir, where a stream of speeding gas guzzlers zoomed past.

The wet snow and sleet began to fall more heavily as I climbed the wee hill beyond the bridge at the head of Castlehill Reservoir and up through Glendevon village. A mile or so further up the glen the cheery christmas lights illuminated a sign, encouraging moi tae purchase a log cabin at Glendevon Castle holiday park. A mile or so further up the glen the road began to climb more steeply up past a couple of wee plantations just short of Glenhead farm and the wind hurled wet snow in my face with increasing intensity.

Another mile or so took me to the narrow col at the head of Glen Eagles, fae where my main concern was trying to restrict my speed, on the long, steep descent down the glen. The road was awash with melting snow, slush then lower down water and my feet were soon soaked as I trailed my legs in a vain attempt to slow my breakneck descent through the dark, swirling tempest. Although the road was pretty straight there was a dodgy moment when negotiating a wee narrow bend beside the Old Toll House, as an oncoming vehicle didnae seem sure which side o' moi tae go.

I began to think my headtorch must've failed moi, as wan or twa approaching gas guzzling riders flashed their lights at ma, helpfully blinding me still further. The worst was yet tae come however, as descending the steepest section towards the high bridge o'er the Ruthen Water, I noticed that mein steed's back wheel was starting tae judder, which was soon followed by a bang, as the inner tube exploded. Fortunately I had only a mile or so tae go to the station fae here but again opted for the longer route along the main road, turning right along the A9 across the railway.

I managed tae keep riding slowly along a gravel path alongside the road, despite hardly being able to see it, cursing my new purchase o' yon headtorch, which had clearly now packed in completely. After some time I was most pleased to see the longed for sign pointing up the road to the station, up which I continued on my slow, bumpy way, urgency being injected on my final approach as I saw a rare Sunday service train pulling into the station.
Last edited by Norman_Grieve on Tue Jan 17, 2012 2:07 pm, edited 11 times in total.
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Re: Innerdouny & Lendrick Hills fae Gleneagles station

Postby mrssanta » Tue Jan 10, 2012 11:11 pm

On tenterhooks for the next instalment!
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Re: Innerdouny & Lendrick Hills fae Gleneagles station

Postby Norman_Grieve » Fri Jan 13, 2012 9:49 am

mrssanta wrote:On tenterhooks for the next instalment!


MissySanta,

Did a 3hr sess yesterday, so noo approaching 2nd summit - hope this meets with your approval. 8)
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Re: Innerdouny & Lendrick Hills fae Gleneagles station

Postby mrssanta » Sat Jan 14, 2012 10:27 pm

I've just been sitting and reading this with the map open in a different tab, excellent stuff. what epic trips you do to bag these wee hills. Waiting for the final instalment and the photies. putting the map up first is a good idea.
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Re: Innerdouny & Lendrick Hills fae Gleneagles station

Postby Norman_Grieve » Mon Jan 16, 2012 12:20 pm

mrssanta wrote:I've just been sitting and reading this with the map open in a different tab, excellent stuff. what epic trips you do to bag these wee hills. Waiting for the final instalment and the photies. putting the map up first is a good idea.


Misssanta, glad UR liking it, I've noo made it back tae the station [not without incident].

As for the photies, they're still in the can, so you'll just hiv tae wait 'til after ma next epic I'm afraid - blame it on the tea leaf who helped themselves tae Wee Norma's digital camera. :(
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Re: Innerdouny & Lendrick Hills fae Gleneagles station

Postby gaffr » Tue Jan 17, 2012 12:35 pm

Oh! no....not our poor old popular chef again. :(
photo.jpg
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Re: Innerdouny & Lendrick Hills fae Gleneagles station

Postby Norman_Grieve » Tue Jan 17, 2012 2:33 pm

gaffr wrote:Oh! no....not our poor old popular chef again. :(
photo.jpg


gaffr, thx 4 your help in apprehending the suspect but we can safely eliminate this gentlemen fae oor enquiries on the basis o' the wrang sex.

By the way, ah'm noo nearly up tae p.100 in yon Travels o' t' Tramp Royal wot you so kindly sent moi - MM has just left Thurso, having paid the princely sum o' 8 auld pennies for his bed fae an auld drunken wifey & is toying wi the idea o' stumping up for a bed in an hotel!

P.S. As you've noo sent my latest TR past the 300 hits trigger point, you have won a prize - see Inver Mallie bothy TR. :wink:
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Re: Innerdouny & Lendrick Hills fae Gleneagles station

Postby Norman_Grieve » Thu Jan 19, 2012 2:35 pm

Norman_Grieve wrote:
gaffr wrote:Oh! no....not our poor old popular chef again. :(
photo.jpg


By the way, ah'm noo nearly up tae p.100 in yon Travels o' t' Tramp Royal wot you so kindly sent moi - MM has just left Thurso, having paid the princely sum o' 8 auld pennies for his bed fae an auld drunken wifey & is toying wi the idea o' stumping up for a bed in an hotel!
:wink:


gaffr, do you know anything aboot this imposter tae Matt Marshall's throne, or did this geezer inherit it? [Next in line...] :shock:

http://www.scottishhills.com/html/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=12564&start=15

P.S. Noo on journey no.2, anither regal site oot in the snowy woods under the stars, approaching Linn o' Dee.
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Re: Innerdouny & Lendrick Hills fae Gleneagles station

Postby malky_c » Thu Jan 19, 2012 2:51 pm

Another day, another epic...

That's quite an effort for two Marilyns, although I suppose you've run out of new ones in the NE now. I had intentions of heading out for a similar bike/walk epic on the 2nd (Corryhabbie and Cook's Cairn from Keith) but the forecast of high winds and snowfall down to 200m put me right off.

Well done for perservering with it :)
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Joined: Nov 22, 2009
Location: Glasgow

Re: Innerdouny & Lendrick Hills fae Gleneagles station

Postby gaffr » Thu Jan 19, 2012 4:02 pm

Never, until now, heard about the adventures of Mr. Bruce. :) But the availabilty of the book in Amazon seems like a snip at just a few pence more than £2....a good bit less than the £19 19s 11 1/2d. tent. :lol:
You seem to be very 'up to date' with your method of communication to the site....do you have one of these 'in the pocket' new fangled, reporting on the hoof type computers?.....like 'I'm heading up towards the Linn of Dee'.
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gaffr
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Posts: 1854
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