walkhighlands

Share your personal walking route experiences in Scotland, and comment on other peoples' reports.
Warning Please note that hillwalking when there is snow lying requires an ice-axe, crampons and the knowledge, experience and skill to use them correctly. Summer routes may not be viable or appropriate in winter. See winter information on our skills and safety pages for more information.

Escape From Corranaich's Bogs Featuring Hydro Man!

Escape From Corranaich's Bogs Featuring Hydro Man!


Postby ScottishLeaf » Fri Jun 08, 2012 12:17 am

Route description: Meall Corranaich and Meall a'Choire Leith

Munros included on this walk: Meall a'Choire Leith, Meall Corranaich

Date walked: 05/06/2012

Time taken: 3.5 hours

Distance: 9.5 km

Ascent: 750m

1 person thinks this report is great.
Register or Login
free to be able to rate and comment on reports (as well as access 1:25000 mapping).

So the Jubilee weekend had came and went, along with a trip up to Corrie Fee with my Mam.
However, my usual walking partner, Rossaldo, is away on holiday for a whole month, so I was left looking for a fairly straight forward walk to do for only my second solo adventure. (Getting scorched on Stuc A'Chroin and Beinn Each last week was my first.)
When the Old Man and the other brother came looking for a lift for their fishing trip, it put Loch Tay and an adventure in the Lawers area on the cards.

I had read a report on here saying that the two Mealls could be a bit of a quagmire, so with that in mind and the relatively dry weather recently, I plumped for them.

The fishermen were dropped off at Loch Tay Highland Lodges, convienently just along the road from the Lawers Road turn off... funny how things just happen to work out lol :shifty: Ten minutes later I was parking up at the small car park at the top of Lairig an Lochain. Or to be more precise, the extra wee bit of space just past the car park, since it was full!

Despite the walk report, the walk doesn't actually start at the blue sign and big boulder, you actually pass it in the car before you park up. It's about 20m back the way you came and is a decent path.
Fake start.
Image

Real start.
Image

Very quickly there are good views back over Lairig an Lochain, the Lawers Dam at the other end of the lochan and over to Meall nan Tarmachan.

Image

Image

A few yards after I had taken these pictures, I came across a girl who was installing a pressure sensor under the path, to count the number of walkers... I was number 1... a small claim to fame :D

Up ahead the first target of the day comes quickly into view.
Image

Not too far after the white stone in the picture, the path peeters out and the first bog of the day is reached. These look to be quite deep and could be quite troublesome in wet weather, but thankfully they were almost completely dried out as I passed by.

Image

As the bog passes by, the line of fence posts is picked up and to the south west the views of Tarmachan are impressive and I noticed it was still retaining a small snow patch on it's north facing side.

Image

But the bog isn't finished yet and after a brief dry patch, more of the yucky stuff has to be crossed. This time it was still wet and muddy.

Image

Still following the fence posts though, this section is quickly past and the path becomes stronger again and after a rocky step, soon begins to steepen, although not too badly.

Image

After a short while the fence posts make a sharp left hand turn (east) and the path splits. One part continues straight on (SE) up onto the grassy SW ridge, but the better walked path seems to cut across the side of the ridge, still following the fence posts. This is the way I went, it's steeper, but more direct and definately manageable. However, on top of the SW ridge I saw a lone doe, keeping a beady eye on me.

Image

The direct path crosses some more moist ground, before turning into a good enough path up to the false summit.

Image

Back behind you, it's possible to see your car in car park. Here I had an odd thought, "what would you do if you saw someone knick it?" While over to your left, you can now see the bogs that must be crossed on the return leg of the journey.

Image

As the false summit is passed on it's northern edge, the path is at it's steepest. While to the south Loch Tay looks resplendant with Ben Vorlich, Stuc A'Chroin and Beinn Each in the distance and Beinn Ghlas looks like the bigger, more magnificent neighbour. (You can't see Lawers yet!)

Image

Image

Surprisingly the false summit has it's own cairn, but it's clearly lower than the main summit, which becomes obvious now, another 500m or so further on. However, most eyes will probably be drawn away from Meall Corranaich's own summit, over to the east, as Ben Lawers now comes into full view, making MC feel rather small. I could also see the near constant conveyer belt of people walking up and over Beinn Ghlas and on onto Ben Lawers. The scar path up the side of Ben Lawers is clearly visible and looks like a giant zip on green velvet.

Image

Image

Image

I reached the modern art cairn at the top of Meall Corranaich in about 65 minutes and I was hardly setting the heather alight with my pace.

Image

Since I had the mountain to myself, I sat down and had a 15 minute break, enjoying a banana and some flask tea, hoping someone else would show up, so I could get a proper summit pic! No such luck :lol:

Having waited long enough, I headed off north, bound for munro number 2 of the day, hoping it would be a little tougher than MC had been. From reading the reports I knew to stay away from the higher NNW ridge, which is easy to spot with it's rocky cap. Although it's easy to see why that mistake could be made from MC's summit, MaCL seems to lie directly behind the NNW ridge and it looks the obvious route.

Image

I didn't notice exactly where the path down to the NNE ridge began, but I spotted it lower down to my right and made my way easily over some white grass and onto the decent path heading over to Meall a'Choire Leith. The path once again splits in two, one branch heading over the top of the ridge and a small hillock, while the other cuts down by a burn and is more direct. I took the burn path and quickly lost height down to the bealach between the two Mealls.

Image

The price paid for speed gained, is the lost view across to the main Lawers range. However, when the bealach is reached and the view returns An Stuc and Meall Garbh are gaining centre stage. I think it's also Schiehallion that can be seen standing like dark pyramid in the far distance.

Image

All too quickly though I was climbing up the moderately steep slope up towards MaCL's summit. The path climbs up the hill's eastern edge, close to the rim of the Choire Leith and this is probably the most exposed the path ever gets, but it is only a small section and only to one side and not even that bad!

Image

From here it's only a short jaunt up to the summit, which is a massive flat plateau. Interestingly though the path once again splits here, one path is short and leads to the summit cairn, but the other continues on across the plateau and down towards the north.

Image

I added the white rock and settled down to finish my packed lunch, only 45 minutes after I began it on top of MC! I have to say, MaCL is unfairly described as the least distinguished of the Lawer's munros. It may be the smallest but, the panoramas were excellent and it's big domed top, is pleasant to sit upon and ponder the surroundings and be amazed at the beauty of Scotland. For me it was the better of the two Munros on this walk.

Image

Image

Image

Image

However, I couldn't linger forever and all too soon I had to head off south west, double checking the direction with my compass as the route says the path isn't clear here. However, in the good conditions I had, you could see the beginnings of a grassy path on the plateau heading in the right direction, then as the steep descent begins, the path is once again decent.

Image

However, at the first boggy section, which is surprisingly high up the hill, given it's steepness, the path becomes intermitant. I aimed for a great big boulder on the banks of the same burn I had walked beside crossing between the two munros. There is an easy crossing point of the burn at this rock, onto solid ground. Unfortuneatly from here on in, solid ground is a rare commodity!

Image

The path once again becomes more obvious here, though it does pass through some muddy sections, but there is always enough of it, to keep you on the right course, then once of the brow of the hill, the small dam and water intake on the Allt Gleann Da-Eig comes into view and the path heads directly for it and crosses the burn, immediately in front of it.

Image

However, if you thought it was boggy so far, you ain't seen nothing yet. As soon as the you climb past the dam, all boggy hell breaks lose. Even in the dry conditions of late, this was still a swampy mess. Luckily for me, I ran into a Scottish Hydro man on a quad bike! He obviously saw the look of horror on my face and said "I've got to take few measurements at the wee intake, gimme 10 mins and I'll give you a lift up to that wee hillock over there, my jeep's just behind it."

So 10 minutes later, with Meall nan Tarmachan in front of me, I was clinging onto the back to a strange man, on the back of a large quad bike, bouncing over bog, grass and heather alike.... it was brilliant!!! Five minutes after that I was unloaded on top of the wee hillock, which I believe it labelled Meall nan Eun on the OS Map. and the Hydro man had my great thanks and a vow, not to tell anyone... oops! :)

"Summit" of the hillock, possibly Meall nan Eun, just after Hydro Man disappered, like a Hi-vis bog fighting crusader in the Glens!
Image

Hydro Man headed off, back across country towards his jeep and trailor and I headed down to the heathery slope, to rejoin the stoney path my journey began on and back to the car, which was now all alone next to the car park.
A quick change of clothing and it was back down to Loch Tay to collect the fishermen, with a quick pause to capture some pics of the Lawers Dam. They had had a successful day too; three perch and two brown trout caught.

Image

Image

Image

PS No, my Dad is not Hydro Man! :lol: :wink:
Attachments

our_route.gpx Open full screen  NB: Walkhighlands is not responsible for the accuracy of gpx files in users posts

User avatar
ScottishLeaf
Wanderer
 
Posts: 355
Munros:114   Corbetts:6
Grahams:2   Donalds:2
Sub 2000:6   
Joined: Mar 13, 2012
Location: Stenhousemuir

Re: Escape From Corranaich's Bogs Featuring Hydro Man!

Postby electricfly » Fri Jun 08, 2012 12:34 am

Nice report. Really pleased that my summit art is still in tact since 19th May. :wink:

The rusty wire tightening post was laying flat by the cairn the day we were there, seemed a shame not to plant it upright. :D

Image

Not so sure that Alfie with walking poles shoved up his backside is a great look however! :shock:
User avatar
electricfly
 
Posts: 1657
Munros:282   Corbetts:29
Grahams:7   
Sub 2000:7   Hewitts:5
Wainwrights:6   
Joined: Mar 19, 2012

Re: Escape From Corranaich's Bogs Featuring Hydro Man!

Postby ScottishLeaf » Fri Jun 08, 2012 12:48 am

Yep, it's still intact... The metal on the ground was gone though.... hope you're dog has gotten over his eerrrrr experience lol


Oh and19th May? I was otherwise engaged at Hampden that day :D :D :D :D :D
User avatar
ScottishLeaf
Wanderer
 
Posts: 355
Munros:114   Corbetts:6
Grahams:2   Donalds:2
Sub 2000:6   
Joined: Mar 13, 2012
Location: Stenhousemuir

1 person thinks this report is great.
Register or Login
free to be able to rate and comment on reports (as well as access 1:25000 mapping).



Return to Walk reports - Scotland

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 37 guests