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Cul Mor - a fine viewpoint to Assynt and Coigach

Cul Mor - a fine viewpoint to Assynt and Coigach


Postby GariochTom » Tue Jul 17, 2012 10:01 pm

Corbetts included on this walk: Cul Mor

Date walked: 14/07/2012

Time taken: 6.5 hours

Distance: 11 km

Ascent: 680m

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At last, some Sun! And we were in Ullapool on the Friday evening with two days of hillwalking ahead, so things were looking up.

Image
Ullapool in the evening by GariochT, on Flickr


cul-mor.gpx Open full screen  NB: Walkhighlands is not responsible for the accuracy of gpx files in users posts


The cloud had set in again the following morning, when we set off from the road near Knockan Crag. We headed up the good path that wove its way past Lochan Fhionnlaidh to the east and Loch an Laoigh to the west.

We started to ascend Meallan Diomhain, the broad southeast shoulder of Cul Mor and as we got higher, the tops of Cul Mor and Suilven were gradually revealed.

Image
On the ascent of Cul Mor by GariochT, on Flickr

Image
Suilven by GariochT, on Flickr

There were extensive views to the east, across Lochs Urigill and Borralan and down Glen Oykel.

Image
Coigach by GariochT, on Flickr

From the top of Meallan Diomhain there was a good view of the corrie which appeared to contain a giant's staircase at its centre.

Image
Cul Mor by GariochT, on Flickr

We headed northwest, to ascend by the slightly gentler northeast ridge rather than tackling the hill head-on. The clouds were moving fast and continually obscuring then revealing Suilven in the distance.

Image
Suilven in the clouds by GariochT, on Flickr

After a short scramble on quartzite blocks, we reached the summit, cloaked in cloud. We stopped for lunch and gradually the clouds cleared, allowing us views down to Loch Veyatie.

Image
Boulder field by GariochT, on Flickr

Image
View from the top by GariochT, on Flickr

However, the best views were yet to come! We gradually descended to the plateau to the west of the summit, and enjoyed stunning views from here – across to Suilven, Stac Pollaidh, Cul Beag and beyond.

Image
On the plateau by GariochT, on Flickr

Image
On the plateau by GariochT, on Flickr

Image
Suilven and Loch Veyatie by GariochT, on Flickr

Image
P1040850 by GariochT, on Flickr

On the plateau we spotted a few plants of Norwegian mugwort, which in Scotland is apparently only found on three mountain tops: Cul Mor, Seana Bhraigh and Carn Ban!

Image
Norwegian mugwort - only found in 3 places in the country! by GariochT, on Flickr

We also found a leveret which was staying perfectly still, hoping that we hadn't noticed it, until it scampered away.

Image
Leveret by GariochT, on Flickr

The next target was Creag nan Calman which didn't seem far away but involved quite a steep ascent. The steepness was worth it for the views though, to Stac Pollaidh and its watery surroundings.

Image
Stac Pollaidh and its watery surroundings by GariochT, on Flickr

Image
Stac Pollaidh by GariochT, on Flickr

Image
On Creag nan Calman by GariochT, on Flickr

We descended east on steep grassy slopes, eventually reaching the main path that took us back to the cars.

Image
Descending by GariochT, on Flickr

There was then time for a short visit to the nearby Elphin Folk Festival (free entry and £2 for coffee and cake!) and Knockan Crag.

Image
Thistle by GariochT, on Flickr

Image
A Man in Assynt by GariochT, on Flickr

Glaciers, grinding West, gouged out
these valleys, rasping the brown sandstone,
and left, on the hard rock below - the
ruffled foreland -
this frieze of mountains, filed
on the blue air - Stac Polly,
Cul Beag, Cul Mor, Suilven, Canisp, a frieze and
a litany.

....

Who possesses this landscape? -
The man who bought it or
I who am possessed by it?

False questions, for
this landscape is
masterless
and intractable in any terms
that are human.

(From A Man in Assynt by Norman MacCaig)
User avatar
GariochTom
Wanderer
 
Posts: 142
Munros:148   Corbetts:34
Grahams:9   
Sub 2000:9   Hewitts:1
Joined: Aug 5, 2008
Location: Aberdeenshire

Re: Cul Mor - a fine viewpoint to Assynt and Coigach

Postby monarchming » Wed Jul 18, 2012 10:23 am

Fine report and pics.We have booked a cottage for October in the Assynt area and Cul Mor is on our to do list. :thumbup:
User avatar
monarchming
Mountain Walker
 
Posts: 257
Munros:158   
Joined: Aug 25, 2009
Location: South Ayrshire

Re: Cul Mor - a fine viewpoint to Assynt and Coigach

Postby GariochTom » Wed Jul 18, 2012 1:23 pm

monarchming wrote:Fine report and pics.We have booked a cottage for October in the Assynt area and Cul Mor is on our to do list. :thumbup:


Hope you have a great trip, Cul Mor is highly recommended especially if the weather is good!
User avatar
GariochTom
Wanderer
 
Posts: 142
Munros:148   Corbetts:34
Grahams:9   
Sub 2000:9   Hewitts:1
Joined: Aug 5, 2008
Location: Aberdeenshire

Re: Cul Mor - a fine viewpoint to Assynt and Coigach

Postby monty » Wed Jul 18, 2012 2:51 pm

Nice report GT. Some cracking photos even in the clag. Suilven looks awesome. :D
monty
 

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