walkhighlands

Share your personal walking route experiences in Scotland, and comment on other peoples' reports.
Warning Please note that hillwalking when there is snow lying requires an ice-axe, crampons and the knowledge, experience and skill to use them correctly. Summer routes may not be viable or appropriate in winter. See winter information on our skills and safety pages for more information.

Autumn in Glen Tanar

Autumn in Glen Tanar


Postby morag1 » Thu Nov 15, 2012 6:54 pm

Route description: Glen Tanar pinewoods, near Aboyne

Date walked: 14/11/2012

6 people think this report is great.
Register or Login
free to be able to rate and comment on reports (as well as access 1:25000 mapping).

Long ago, somewhere in the mists of time, the Caledonian Forest covered most of Scotland. Native species of tree - Rowan, Silver Birch and Scots Pine - made up a vast wilderness in which roamed wild boar, deer, the osprey and the capercaillie.

Deep, deep in the heart of Glen Tanar are the remains of this ancient forest

I've wanted to see these old Scots Pines for some time, so during a recent weekend on Deeside, a bright and sunny day saw us heading for the Glen. We followed the WH directions for this walk, and then extended it to take us to the foot of Mount Keen. We only had around 4-5 hours daylight before the darkness descended.

All the walks in the Glen go past the ancient Chapel of St Lesmo
Image

I noticed this stone carving in the chapel grounds
Image

I thought it might have been a Pictish carving but I wasn't sure
It seems a shame the stone was covered in moss and lichen, I wish someone would clean it up.

Heading up towards the Knockie viewpoint
People have been walking this path since the Bronze age
Image

Hey you wait for me!!!


The Knockie viewpoint gives beautiful views of the Pinewoods
Image

Mount Keen can be seen above the trees
Image

There are two paths here. One takes you down to the Water of Tanar to continue this walk, the other takes you higher all the way to a hill called Baudy Meg. Im not sure why it's called that, it doesnt sound very Scottish to me :think:

Baudy Meg (this photo was taken earlier from the car park, you cant really see it from here),
There is a path going all the way to the top. This is going to be my next walk in the Glen :D
Image

Soon you come to what seems like an old well
I think there was a stone carving near here but I missed it at the time
Image

Heading down to the Water of Tanar, past these lovely silver birch trees
Image

The walk now follows the water all the way to Mount Keen
Image

There, these crystal streams forever.....
Image

.....Flow into the mighty Dee
Image

These magnificent old Scots Pines are found deep in the heart of the forest
Image

Close-up of the Pines
Image

As old as time itself.....
Image

This track is the main walk-in for those climbing Mount Keen through Glen Tanar
It reminds me of the long walk-in from the Linn of Dee to Derry Lodge. This walk offers more shelter but takes much longer, roughly two hours
Image

Approaching the end of the forest.
Beyond that lies the open moorland which takes you up to Mount Keen. There is a half-way hut just along here where you can shelter if the weather is bad
Image

The bridge over the Tanar
This is the end of the walk as described on WH.
Image

Cross the bridge and turn right to begin the walk back to the start
Image

The Mounth road, an ancient route which takes you across the Mounth Hills all the way to Glen Esk. I'd love to walk the whole way sometime.
Image

There is another ancient right of way from Aboyne called the Fungle, I've got my eye on doing that walk too.

The road goes past this boating lochan
Image

I noticed this carved stone, celebrating the jubilee of Queen Victoria, who spent much of her time around these parts.
Image

When I got home I did a search on google, and found out there are many carved stones all over the Glen Tanar estate They were put there by William Cunliffe Brooks, an English MP who owned most of the Glen at one point. I must have walked past most of them, although to be fair they are hard to make out, you have to know what you are looking for.

This was my favourite stone, found opposite the Chapel of St Lesmo
It sits in front of an old well
Image

Drink weary pilgrim, drink and pray
Image

Ceud Mille Failte
One Hundred Thousand Welcomes - The centuries-old greeting of the Highlanders
This stone is found near the car park and the entrance to the estate
Image

Driving back to the Granite City, we made a detour to see the Queens View
Mount Keen, Lochnagar and Morven all lined up together.
Image

There is another Queens View at the head of Loch Tummel with beautiful views towards Schiehallion, but I like the Aberdeen one better

Morven from Queens View
Image

I'll be seeing in the New Year on Deeside, and I'm hoping to persuade some of the Aiberdonians to lay off the juice long enough to do the Baudy Meg circuit with me :D

Wheelchair users - Please note there is an excellent path all the way round and I would certainly recommend it. However the Knockie viewpoint is very steep so it might be best to bypass that part.
Also the first part of the walk, from the car park to the chapel of St Lesmo is often very boggy. I think you could avoid it by going on the tarmacadam road so far then joining up with the route near the water.
Please feel free to PM me if you would like me to help further :D
Last edited by morag1 on Thu Jan 10, 2013 3:38 am, edited 4 times in total.
morag1
 

Re: Autumn in Glen Tanar

Postby morag1 » Sun Nov 25, 2012 11:37 am

Glen Tanar
morag1
 

Re: Autumn in Glen Tanar

Postby morag1 » Sun Nov 25, 2012 11:39 am

Glen Tanar
morag1
 

Re: Autumn in Glen Tanar

Postby gammy leg walker » Sun Nov 25, 2012 11:51 am

Looks a fine walk Morag.
User avatar
gammy leg walker
Mountaineer
 
Posts: 3392
Munros:272   Corbetts:7
Grahams:4   Donalds:3
Sub 2000:2   
Islands:7
Joined: Jan 30, 2010
Location: Central Region
Walk wish-list

Re: Autumn in Glen Tanar

Postby Tomsie » Sun Nov 25, 2012 12:27 pm

Have done the walk through forrest up the glen to Mount Keen a few times, nice grassy area for picnics or just relaxing at foot of munro
User avatar
Tomsie
Walker
 
Posts: 1163
Munros:143   Corbetts:65
Grahams:38   Donalds:33
Sub 2000:14   Hewitts:5
Wainwrights:1   
Joined: Jan 8, 2011

Re: Autumn in Glen Tanar

Postby BoyVertiginous » Sun Nov 25, 2012 12:28 pm

Looks like you got a cracking day for it, Morag.
User avatar
BoyVertiginous
Wanderer
 
Posts: 1262
Munros:226   Corbetts:69
Grahams:26   Donalds:11
Sub 2000:45   Hewitts:10
Wainwrights:19   Islands:18
Joined: Jun 14, 2011
Location: california

Re: Autumn in Glen Tanar

Postby quoman » Sun Nov 25, 2012 1:34 pm

Very nice walk and informative to boot morag
User avatar
quoman
Mountaineer
 
Posts: 960
Munros:282   Corbetts:10
Grahams:1   Donalds:5
Sub 2000:2   
Joined: Nov 14, 2011
Location: larbert

Re: Autumn in Glen Tanar

Postby SusieThePensioner » Sun Nov 25, 2012 6:58 pm

I always enjoy your reports, Morag, with all the information you give us, thank you.
That looked a lovely walk and some great photos as well :thumbup:
Would the route be ok for the wheelchair?
User avatar
SusieThePensioner
 
Posts: 1543
Munros:6   Corbetts:3
Grahams:4   Donalds:7
Sub 2000:3   Hewitts:107
Wainwrights:156   
Joined: Sep 7, 2011
Location: County Durham

Re: Autumn in Glen Tanar

Postby morag1 » Sun Nov 25, 2012 9:53 pm

SusieThePensioner wrote:Would the route be ok for the wheelchair?

Funny you should say that Susie, I was just thinking the route is great for someone with a wheelchair, I think I'll go right back and edit my post to include that. Hope you do make it to the Glen soon, would love to see what you make of it :D

quoman wrote:Very nice walk and informative to boot

Cheers Quoman, I like my history, hope you dont mind me harping on :lol:

BoyVertiginous wrote:Looks like you got a cracking day for it

I did BoyV, wouldnt have enjoyed the walk without the sunshine 8)

Tomsie wrote: nice grassy area for picnics or just relaxing at foot of munro

You're right there Tomsie, it's a great spot, also got the half way hut in case it starts to rain :D

gammy leg walker wrote:Looks a fine walk Morag

Cheers Gammy, I really enjoyed it, still got the buzz it gave me :D
morag1
 

Re: Autumn in Glen Tanar

Postby mgmt! » Sun Nov 25, 2012 11:28 pm

nice one morag, the glen tanner estate is a beautiful place for walks and wildlife, has some brilliant fishing too.
mgmt!
Mountaineer
 
Posts: 540
Joined: Oct 18, 2010

Re: Autumn in Glen Tanar

Postby morag1 » Mon Nov 26, 2012 3:27 pm

mgmt! wrote: the glen tanner estate is a beautiful place for walks and wildlife

Hi mgmt! I think so too, really love the estate, cant wait till my next visit :D
morag1
 

Re: Autumn in Glen Tanar

Postby ChrisW » Mon Nov 26, 2012 5:12 pm

This is a lovely memory jogger for me Morag, I really enjoyed Glen Tanar and visited there many times making some huge circuits on the easygoing terrain, I remember this route well. Thanks for bringing back such fond memories. :D

I've done Baudy Meg a few times and posted two of them on here Spring and Winter, I have to say with snow on the ground it wasn't the most interesting of hikes, but still far better than being indoors. :wink:
User avatar
ChrisW
Rambler
 
Posts: 4940
Munros:18   Corbetts:5
Grahams:3   
Sub 2000:6   
Joined: Jan 25, 2011
Location: Cochrane- Alberta - Canada

Re: Autumn in Glen Tanar

Postby Rudolph » Mon Nov 26, 2012 8:26 pm

ChrisW wrote:This is a lovely memory jogger for me Morag, I really enjoyed Glen Tanar and visited there many times making some huge circuits on the easygoing terrain, I remember this route well. Thanks for bringing back such fond memories. :D

I've done Baudy Meg a few times and posted two of them on here Spring and Winter, I have to say with snow on the ground it wasn't the most interesting of hikes, but still far better than being indoors. :wink:


I've been up Baudy Meg once back in the days when it snowed properly - and we went to ski up there. We had a tractor tow up on Baudy Meg so we got a lift up on / in the estate landrover. The keeper's son had to sit on the bonnet to keep the front wheels gripping. The rest of us sat in the back on the skis etc. Eventually we got there and the tractor was half buried in the snow and wouldn't start. So the poor keeper's son was sent back down to bring up fresh battery. My memory says that he went on foot but that can't be right surely...

Still tow was started and we all had our arms pulled out holding on to the rope to pull us up.

My other memory of St Lesmo's chapel was walking past it and then 'chased' by a herd of wild ponies and having my mother pull me out the way behind some trees. I think she may have over-reacted a bit since we didn't hear of many horse related fatalities in the area.
User avatar
Rudolph
Mountain Walker
 
Posts: 439
Munros:265   
Hewitts:2
Wainwrights:1   
Joined: May 14, 2012

Re: Autumn in Glen Tanar

Postby morag1 » Mon Nov 26, 2012 9:06 pm

[quote="Rudolph"] I think she may have over-reacted a bit since we didn't hear of many horse related fatalities in the area.

:lol: :lol: Great memories Rudolph :D


[quote="ChrisW"]This is a lovely memory jogger for me Morag, I really enjoyed Glen Tanar and visited there many times making some huge circuits on the easygoing terrain, I remember this route well. Thanks for bringing back such fond memories. :D

Hi Chris, I've been reading some of your Deeside reports and I know how much you liked the Glen, glad it brought back good memories for you :D We dont have a lot of time when we're up north so I'm always looking for walks of around 4 hours, hence the Baudy Meg circuit. Will let you know how I find it . (Also looked at your Pressendye/Morven/Banchory routes :D )
morag1
 

Re: Autumn in Glen Tanar

Postby mountain thyme » Mon Nov 26, 2012 10:10 pm

looks a nice wee walk morag :)
User avatar
mountain thyme
Walker
 
Posts: 984
Munros:40   Corbetts:222
Grahams:12   Donalds:11
Sub 2000:3   Hewitts:1
Wainwrights:1   Islands:17
Joined: Jul 22, 2010
Location: Glasgow

6 people think this report is great.
Register or Login
free to be able to rate and comment on reports (as well as access 1:25000 mapping).

Next



Walkhighlands community forum is advert free


Your generosity keeps this site running.
Can you help support Walkhighlands and the online community by donating by direct debit?



Return to Walk reports - Scotland

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: blackyakk, Chappy and 37 guests