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Conquering the mighty Sallows

Conquering the mighty Sallows


Postby johnkaysleftleg » Fri Apr 05, 2013 10:34 am

Wainwrights included on this walk: Sallows, Sour Howes

Date walked: 30/03/2013

Distance: 8 km

Ascent: 460m

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Anybody who read the report of our first day in the Lakes will know of the camera related disasters of day one. Fortunately it was discovered that Graces camera could be charged by the same lead as our phones so at least I’d be able to snap away till my heart was content. :)

We decided it would be prudent to stick to the lower fells as we made our way to Troutbeck again (this time parking at Church Bridge) to bag the strangely named Sallows and Sour Howes. There is some rhyme that derides the English naming of hills giving all the different Scottish/Gaelic words for hill, peak etc. Who ever wrote it had certainly not looked at a map of the Lakes because there’s some truly strange and original names given to the fells in this part of the world.


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As with our ascent of Wansfell our walk started up a track (that would eventually become the Garburn Road). Unfortunately (for Grace at least) this track was largely snow free and this led to much grumpiness from our daughter and statements of how “boring!” this route was. Personally I quite liked the easy incline with great views towards Threshthwaite Mouth but then again I am 40.

Image
Troutbeck by johnkaysleftleg, on Flickr

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Thresh't mouth by johnkaysleftleg, on Flickr

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Garburn Road by johnkaysleftleg, on Flickr

Graces Woes were forgotten however once we reached Garburn Nook and we set off up the open fellside which being North West facing still had a huge amount of wind blown snow. It might have only been a small fell in the English Lake District but for a brief time it could have been just about anywhere and really added to what could have been a somewhat nondescript route. Once we reached the ridge the snow petered out somewhat due to scouring by the wind and it was a simple wander to the summit mound of Sallows.

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Garburn Nook by johnkaysleftleg, on Flickr

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Wind driven snow on Sallows by johnkaysleftleg, on Flickr

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Grace & Hughie on Sallows by johnkaysleftleg, on Flickr

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Hughie looking cute by johnkaysleftleg, on Flickr

We enjoyed fantastic views of the Kentmere horseshoe from the summit with the more distant Howgills also grabbing the attention. We dropped down to an area of small rocky outcrops for a bit shelter and had lunch.

Image
Howgills from Sallows by johnkaysleftleg, on Flickr

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Sallows summit panorama by johnkaysleftleg, on Flickr(click for bigger version)

The remainder of the walk was very simple as we followed the wall, with more fantastic snow drifts towards the collection of lumps that make up Sour Howes summit. This is one of those tops that nobody quite knows just what the highest point is (certainly AW didn't). Some people will lose sleep over ensuring they ascended the exact lump but for me as long as nothing looks higher and I'm in the right vicinity I'm fairly happy.

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Grace on the Stile by johnkaysleftleg, on Flickr

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Along the Wall by johnkaysleftleg, on Flickr

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Drifts by johnkaysleftleg, on Flickr

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Ill Bell by johnkaysleftleg, on Flickr

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Grace on Sour Howes Summit by johnkaysleftleg, on Flickr

Once we had taken in the sights we set off across some rough pathless terrain heading towards the wall that traverses the fell to the South West. As luck would have it we came across a stile that had a fairly clear path (not shown on OS maps) from it that led us back to the track we initially set off on.

Image
Sallows by johnkaysleftleg, on Flickr

We had had the micro-spikes on since Garburn Nook but due to less and less snow we had taken them off before we crossed the last bit of snowy ground. The worth of these things was proven beyond doubt as Nicola immediately slipped on her backside as she attempted to cross the slippy white stuff. :lol: :silent: :wink:

It was another great day out (with or without my DSLR) and with the weather holding we had another two days to enjoy the Lakes is such superb conditions. :D
Last edited by johnkaysleftleg on Thu Jun 27, 2013 9:43 am, edited 2 times in total.
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johnkaysleftleg
Walker
 
Posts: 3036
Munros:25   Corbetts:10
Grahams:10   Donalds:3
Sub 2000:7   Hewitts:166
Wainwrights:214   Islands:8
Joined: Jan 28, 2009
Location: County Durham

Re: Conquering the mighty Sallows

Postby richardkchapman » Fri Apr 05, 2013 10:46 am

Great pictures. Looks like there's a little more snow over on that side of the lakes than we have in the west.

I'm with you rather than Grace on the merits of snow on a walk. I'm all for seeing it at a distance but I'd rather not be walking on it. Give me a boring easy incline with great views every time - but then again I am 47.

How are the microspikes when you are walking on mixed terrain, with only partial snow cover?
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Re: Conquering the mighty Sallows

Postby johnkaysleftleg » Fri Apr 05, 2013 10:53 am

richardkchapman wrote:Great pictures. Looks like there's a little more snow over on that side of the lakes than we have in the west.

I'm with you rather than Grace on the merits of snow on a walk. I'm all for seeing it at a distance but I'd rather not be walking on it. Give me a boring easy incline with great views every time - but then again I am 47.

How are the microspikes when you are walking on mixed terrain, with only partial snow cover?


Thanks Richard, The spikes are fine as long as you stay on the softer ground. Also they are so easy to put on and remove it's not a problem to put them on for just small stretches. I can't recommend them highly enough to be honest.
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johnkaysleftleg
Walker
 
Posts: 3036
Munros:25   Corbetts:10
Grahams:10   Donalds:3
Sub 2000:7   Hewitts:166
Wainwrights:214   Islands:8
Joined: Jan 28, 2009
Location: County Durham

Re: Conquering the mighty Sallows

Postby SusieThePensioner » Fri Apr 05, 2013 8:29 pm

Another opportunity for getting out and having some wonderful views :D
I really like the drifting snow photos and the view of the Howgills :thumbup: Love the cute Hughie 8)
I'm with Grace, love the snow, but then I am 63 and like a child :lol: :lol: :lol:
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SusieThePensioner
 
Posts: 1543
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Location: County Durham

Re: Conquering the mighty Sallows

Postby ChrisW » Fri Apr 05, 2013 8:59 pm

What a lovely hike JK, clearly the quality pics are down to the photographer rather than the camera :wink: I love the shots of the drifts :clap: If you ever do find out how the hell those hills got their names make sure you post it here so we can all understand :crazy:
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ChrisW
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Re: Conquering the mighty Sallows

Postby johnkaysleftleg » Fri Apr 05, 2013 9:42 pm

SusieThePensioner wrote:Another opportunity for getting out and having some wonderful views :D
I really like the drifting snow photos and the view of the Howgills :thumbup: Love the cute Hughie 8)
I'm with Grace, love the snow, but then I am 63 and like a child :lol: :lol: :lol:


I must admit even though I'm grown up :lol: and not supposed to like the white stuff I always get a tinge of childish excitement when I see it. It is even better when you can walk up a hill and mess about getting knee deep in drifts then walk down again. :D

ChrisW wrote:What a lovely hike JK, clearly the quality pics are down to the photographer rather than the camera :wink: I love the shots of the drifts :clap: If you ever do find out how the hell those hills got their names make sure you post it here so we can all understand :crazy:


Thanks Chris, wait till you here some of the strange things on the OS map for our final walk of the week, totaly baffling. :crazy: :)
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johnkaysleftleg
Walker
 
Posts: 3036
Munros:25   Corbetts:10
Grahams:10   Donalds:3
Sub 2000:7   Hewitts:166
Wainwrights:214   Islands:8
Joined: Jan 28, 2009
Location: County Durham

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