walkhighlands

This board helps you to share your walking route experiences in England and Wales... or overseas.
Warning Please note that hillwalking when there is snow lying requires an ice-axe, crampons and the knowledge, experience and skill to use them correctly. Summer routes may not be viable or appropriate in winter. See winter information on our skills and safety pages for more information.

Lord's Seat

Lord's Seat


Postby richardkchapman » Mon Oct 28, 2013 9:56 pm

Wainwrights included on this walk: Barf, Broom Fell, Graystones, Lord's Seat

Date walked: 26/10/2013

Time taken: 5.3

Distance: 14.88 km

Ascent: 618m

Register or Login
free to be able to rate and comment on reports (as well as access 1:25000 mapping).


Track_LORDS SEAT_opt.gpx Open full screen  NB: Walkhighlands is not responsible for the accuracy of gpx files in users posts



Just arrived in the Lakes for our annual October week, with the weather forecast sounding far
from promising. It sounded like the best few hours of the entire week would be the first few hours
of our first day, so we dragged the kids out of bed as early as we could manage, and up the nearest
fell.

Image
Darling How Cottage

We set off from the cottage we are staying at (Darling How), near the Spout Force car park at the western
end of Whinlatter pass, aiming for Lord's Seat.

Image
Setting off up the forest road

The route to Lord's Seat is almost entirely on forest roads, making for easy gradients and good underfoot - given the amount of rain we have had lately it seemed like a good idea to avoid anything too muddy

Image
Mist over the forest

A few wisps of low cloud were blowing across the forest, but the weather was generally looking pretty good, with the tops (at least the ones we were interested in) out of the clouds, and no rain.

Image
Forestry by numbers

According to the map, the road would be mostly through forests (which we thought might offer some shelter from the heavy rain forecast to start at 3pm), but in fact many of the trees had been cleared on one side of the road or the other, so we were usually walking beside forests rather than through them.

The forests looked like they had been planted according to a "Painting by numbers" board.

Image
The outsider

After a few kilometers on the forest road, there was a path leading off up towards Lord's Seat - but this was one that Wainwright warns off as being very muddy, so we continued round towards his route 'B'.

However a second path leading off to the left seemed more promising, and cut off a large loop of the forest road towards Ullister Hill.

Image
Approaching Lord's Seat summit

After Ullister Hill, the path was narrower, but still very easy gradients and good underfoot.

Image
View from Lord's Seat

The top of Lord's Seat had some good views, but also some very high winds, so we did not linger long, but instead headed off towards Barf.

Image
View from Lord's Seat

Image
Panorama from Lord's Seat

Image
Lord's Seat summit

A very easy short stroll later, we approached the top of Barf.

Image
Approaching Barf summit

Barf is a pretty low fell, but has some nice views

Image
Bassenthwaite from Barf

Image
View from Barf

Disaster almost struck as we left Barf, when Sarah realized she didn't have her phone any more - I've never seen her sprint up a mountain so quickly as when she raced back to the spot we had had our last chocolate break, before returning gleefully clutching the runaway phone.

We contoured around Lord's Seat towards the Broom Fell path - this was a mistake, as what had started out as a good path quickly disappeared and left us traipsing unpleasantly through heather with ankle-twisting angles underfoot. Going back over the top of Lord's Seat would have been better, I think.

Image
Darling How from Broom Fell ridge

From the ridge to Broom Fell, we were looking for possible ways down, mindful of the weather forecast that had confidently predicted that heavy rain would start at 3pm. But we were making good time - nearly at Broom Fell and still hadn't stopped for lunch.

Image
Approaching Broom Fell summit

Image
Broom Fell Summit

At the summit of Broom Fell there is a small wind shelter, but not large enough for all of us, so plans to lunch there had to be postponed. We debated taking the path following the fence down to the valley from here, but decided that the route back down over Greystones was probably just as easy.

Just after Widow's Hause we encountered this rather interesting stile, which the builders of the new fence had thoughtfully provided, but which was blocked on three sides by the old fence that stlll had to be negotiated before it could be reached.

Image
The fenced-off stile

The summit of Greystones is fairly nondescript

Image
Greystones summit

The path down from Greystones following the wall was steep, though not quite as precipitous as it looks in this picture (the scale is deceiving)

Image
On the way down Greystones

Once we reached the old forest road we turned left into the forests of Darling How plantation.

Image
Into Darling How plantation

Image
Darling How plantation

The occasional beech tree in among the conifers added some autumm colour

Image
Darling How plantation

The forest road takes a fairly circuitous route back to the main road, but a path off to the right looked like it would cut off a large corner. Just a nagging doubt about how we would cross the stream...

Image
The top of Spout Force

Which turned into a major concern once we got to the stream, and found that we could not follow any further downstream to the bridge, nor was there any easy way to cross.

Image
Crossing the stream

But we were only a few hundred yards from home, so wet boots seemed like a minor hardship compared to retracing our steps. The water was not particularly cold.

Image
Crossing the stream

All in all, a very satisfying day's walking, and we got back before the rain. Gradient were gentle throughout, and the tracks were almost all very easy underfoot.
richardkchapman
Mountaineer
 
Posts: 104
Grahams:1   
Hewitts:88
Wainwrights:190   
Joined: Aug 29, 2010

Re: Lord's Seat

Postby johnkaysleftleg » Mon Nov 04, 2013 8:37 pm

Just recently climbed these fells (along with Whinlatter). I can imagine Darling How being a lovely location to stay, shame about the weather for the week, we were suffering in the West Highlands with similarly poor conditions. It's amazing how fast somebody can run if a beloved mobile phone is missing :lol:
User avatar
johnkaysleftleg
Mountaineer
 
Posts: 3204
Munros:25   Corbetts:10
Grahams:10   Donalds:3
Sub 2000:7   Hewitts:166
Wainwrights:214   Islands:8
Joined: Jan 28, 2009
Location: County Durham

Re: Lord's Seat

Postby simon-b » Tue Nov 05, 2013 9:49 pm

Four nice fells, Richard, I've always enjoyed hiking north of Whinlatter. There are some nice views to the Cumbrian Coast and Solway Firth, among other things. I'm glad the phone was recovered!

It sounds like you were using Chris Jesty's update of Wainwright's North Western Fells: It's CJ you've got to thank for avoiding the worst of the mud on Lord's Seat; AW didn't mention it in the original edition. Maps and guide books seem to go out of date in the afforested parts of Lakeland more quickly than in any other areas of the district, I find. It's always fun unravelling the mazes in the forests around Whinlatter!
User avatar
simon-b
Munro compleatist
 
Posts: 1970
Munros:282   Corbetts:30
Grahams:7   Donalds:12
Sub 2000:1   Hewitts:155
Wainwrights:214   Islands:4
Joined: Jan 2, 2012
Location: Wakefield, West Yorkshire

Re: Lord's Seat

Postby richardkchapman » Wed Nov 06, 2013 11:07 pm

johnkaysleftleg wrote:Just recently climbed these fells (along with Whinlatter). I can imagine Darling How being a lovely location to stay, shame about the weather for the week, we were suffering in the West Highlands with similarly poor conditions. It's amazing how fast somebody can run if a beloved mobile phone is missing :lol:


It was a lovely location, though it seems to be a real wind tunnel - the gales past the window seemed almost as ferocious as the ones on the tops.

We did Whinlatter fell too - I'll post the walk report for that once I can get the photos off Sarah's phone.

simon-b wrote:Four nice fells, Richard, I've always enjoyed hiking north of Whinlatter. There are some nice views to the Cumbrian Coast and Solway Firth, among other things. I'm glad the phone was recovered!

It sounds like you were using Chris Jesty's update of Wainwright's North Western Fells: It's CJ you've got to thank for avoiding the worst of the mud on Lord's Seat; AW didn't mention it in the original edition. Maps and guide books seem to go out of date in the afforested parts of Lakeland more quickly than in any other areas of the district, I find. It's always fun unravelling the mazes in the forests around Whinlatter!


Yes, I really enjoyed these fells - and nice easy walking.

I have both Chris Jesty's update and the original editions of Wainwright - the latter are great for "armchair walking" but the updates are much better for taking out on the fells. I recently had to use one of the original edition "Northern Fells" for an ascent of Lonscale Fell, and we spent a long time trying to follow a non-existant path and looking for a "new fence" of which only a single gatepost remained. When I later checked the new edition, that route (and mention of the fence) had been removed! I'm definitely a big fan of the updates!
richardkchapman
Mountaineer
 
Posts: 104
Grahams:1   
Hewitts:88
Wainwrights:190   
Joined: Aug 29, 2010

Register or Login
free to be able to rate and comment on reports (as well as access 1:25000 mapping).




Walkhighlands community forum is advert free


Your generosity keeps this site running.
Can you help support Walkhighlands and the online community by donating by direct debit?



Return to Walk reports - Outside Scotland

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 13 guests