walkhighlands

Share your personal walking route experiences in Scotland, and comment on other peoples' reports.
Warning Please note that hillwalking when there is snow lying requires an ice-axe, crampons and the knowledge, experience and skill to use them correctly. Summer routes may not be viable or appropriate in winter. See winter information on our skills and safety pages for more information.

Sgurr an t- Sasunnaich .. Arisaig

Sgurr an t- Sasunnaich .. Arisaig


Postby DonnyW » Fri May 14, 2010 9:05 pm

Date walked: 09/05/2010

1 person thinks this report is great.
Register or Login
free to be able to rate and comment on reports (as well as access 1:25000 mapping).

Date Walked 6-5-10
Distance 5 or 6 miles
Height climbed approx 1500 ft
Time taken … all day .. simply because it was so enjoyable

I find that hills, like people, seem to have unique personalities. No two are the same and often it’s the quiet un noticed ones that prove to be the best characters and most fun, if only you take the time to get to know them.

I discovered one such hill last Sunday. I was aware of its existence but couldn’t tell you its name until I had finished the walk , returned home and looked at the OS map of the area. That’s when I discovered it was called Sgurr an t- Sasunnaich and it forms the edge of the highland plateau behind Arisaig. When boating among the Skerries at Arisaig I couldn’t help but notice the crags and cliffs of Sgurr an t- Sasunnaich dominating the mainland sky line behind Arisaig. I made my mind up there and then to explore it further.


Sgurr an t- Sasunnaich at sunset, taken from the shore at Keppoch
Image


Looking at the hill, the obvious way to the summit was to walk the farm road to the radio station on the south slopes then ascend the ridge before turning north towards to the summit. It wasn’t long before the views across to the small islands opened up.

Gaining the ridge at the radio station with the mountains of Rhum in the background
Image

I love hillwalks like these, there is little or no sign of paths or people. It’s a very craggy ridge so you choose your own route and it can be as easy as you wish or perhaps involve some scrambling or even short rock climbing to suit your taste and keep your interest going.

The skerries at the entrance to Loch nan Ceall with the Island of Eigg in the distance.
Muck is of its southern point.


More skerries and Eigg
Image


To the north west is the Island of Skye with the Cuillin and Blaven dominating the sky line
Image

The rocky summit of Sgurr an t- Sasunnaich. Its summit cairn is only 351 meters high but what delightful views it offers.
Image
The ridge continues northwards past a lovely little circular lochan
Image

At the lochan I stopped for lunch. It was such a beautiful day and a beautiful view.
Image

At the northern end of the ridge, the views to the west are over a sheer drop of around 1000 ft
Image

The white sands of Morar are seen at the sea loch in the right of this photo
Image

Freshwater Loch Morar is seen here. It’s the deepest freshwater loch in the UK and also is reputed to have a Loch Ness type monster.
Image

Looking inland the rocky peak of Sgurr an Albanaich at 394 meters high was to be our next stop. It reminded me a little of Stac Polly
Image

But first I had to negotiate a few peat hags Image

The was not path or even summit cairn on Sgurr an Albanaich but it offered great views. Unfortunately someone was burning heather and the smoke was now almost as thick as a clag cloud

The smoke really hazed the atmosphere but this photo give a good view of the ridge of Sgurr an t- Sasunnaich with all its craggy false summits.
Image

After the day of slowly plodding around the high plateau area I returned to the beach and settled down to another wonderful sunset
Image
User avatar
DonnyW
 
Posts: 478
Joined: Dec 18, 2009

1 person thinks this report is great.
Register or Login
free to be able to rate and comment on reports (as well as access 1:25000 mapping).


Walkhighlands community forum is advert free

We need help to keep the site online.
Can you help support Walkhighlands and the online community by setting up a monthly donation by direct debit?



Return to Walk reports - Scotland

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: PeteR, SecondRow and 58 guests