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Grike to Lank Rigg and stuff in between.

Grike to Lank Rigg and stuff in between.


Postby trailmasher » Sun Jan 18, 2015 8:31 pm

Wainwrights included on this walk: Caw Fell, Crag Fell, Grike, Haycock, Lank Rigg

Hewitts included on this walk: Haycock, Iron Crag

Date walked: 04/05/2007

Time taken: 8.28

Distance: 27.3 km

Ascent: 1114m

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Grike-Haycock-Lank Rigg Circular.gpx Open full screen  NB: Walkhighlands is not responsible for the accuracy of gpx files in users posts


It was a warm, sunny, but hazy day as Joe and I, along with Nelson set off from the car park which is near to the Kinniside Stone Circle on the Wasdale Road from Ennerdale Bridge.
Kinniside stone circle.jpg
Kinniside stone circle

Our first objective was the summit of Grike at 1,596ft/486metres which was attained by following a path of easy gradient to the foot of the fell and then a reasonable climb to the summit on a fairly indistinct path.
Grike summit cairn and shelter.jpg
Grike summit cairn and shelter

Grike summit.JPG
Grike summit

Looking towards Lank Rigg from Grike.jpg
Looking towards Lank Rigg from Grike

Crag Fell as seen from Grike.jpg
Crag Fell as seen from Grike

On reaching the summit from where the views are spectacular we then continued on an easterly course that led us to the summit of Crag Fell at 1,710ft/521metres.
Crag Fell summit cairn.jpg
Crag Fell summit cairn

Grike as seen from Crag Fell.jpg
Grike as seen from Crag Fell

Ennerdale Water as seen from Crag Fell.jpg
Ennerdale Water as seen from Crag Fell

Leaving Crag Fell we then took a south easterly course down the fell until we reached the forestry road which we crossed over and went through the pine forest for a short distance and finally reaching the open fell again. From here it was a simple matter to follow the wall all the way to Caw Fell some 3½ miles away. Or so I thought. Following A. Wainwrights directions we crossed to the left hand side of the wall by way of a gate.
On we went crossing over Iron Crag on the way until finally reaching the bottom of the fell only to discover that we could not get over the wall which is of some considerable height and topped of with double strands of barbed wire. In his - Wainwrights - day, it must have been possible to get over the wall quite easily. Not so with a 6½ stone black Labrador to contend with. So, we about turned and climbed back up the fell stopping for lunch on the way back thanks to a convenient rocky outcrop. It was probably my own fault in presuming that there was access through the wall at the bottom corner.
Joe looking at Caw Fell.jpg
Joe looking at Caw Fell

Finding our way back to the gate after lunch we set off down the fell again to reach the col at the head of Bleaberry Gill. It was here that we met a fencer who was re-instating the old fences throughout the area to prevent the fells from being over grazed by the sheep. The National Trust has set up a programme of works which involves the fencing works and the rebuilding of dry stone walls. This will be no mean task as the area is very remote and the ground hard and rocky which doesn’t affect the wall builders but it does the fencing contractor.
It was at this point that I got a bad bout of indigestion and felt as though I was full of marbles. Anyway we trudged up the fell to reach the top of Caw Fell and then continued until we reached the summit at 2,288ft/697metres.
Caw Fell summit.JPG
Caw Fell summit

Caw Fell summit cairn with the High Stile Range behind.jpg
Caw Fell top with the High Stile Range behind

Once here we took a look at Haycock and decided to fit it in with our walk even though it wasn’t a planned part of our route. It was here on Caw Fell that the contractor’s accommodation cabins had been set up and tied down with large straps fixed to metal posts due to the nature of the high winds that can be found around this area. We climbed up the rocky route to the summit by way of Little Gowder Crag to the summit of Haycock which is at 2,618ft/798metres from where we had good views of Pillar, Steeple, the High Stile Range, Yewbarrow,etc.
Haycock summit cairn with Scoat Tarn and Red Pike behind.jpg
Haycock summit cairn with Scoat Fell and Red Pike behind

A secondary cairn on Haycock.jpg
A secondary cairn on Haycock

Little Gowder Crag as seen from Haycock.jpg
Little Gowder Crag as seen from Haycock

Haycock summit.JPG
Haycock summit

From this point we were on the homeward stretch though we had about 6 miles of walking in front of us including the climb of approx 1,200ft up to the summit of Lank Rigg. So off we went. I have to say that the going on this walk has been fairly easy, with a couple of long, steep climbs thrown in. We set off in a westerly direction back over Caw Fell and then down to the old Water Intake Works at the foot of the fell to be climbed.
The old water Intake Works at the foot of Lank Rigg.jpg
The old water Intake Works at the foot of Lank Rigg

Lank Rigg as seen from Bleaberry Gill.jpg
Lank Rigg as seen from Bleaberry Gill

The fell side looked awesome. 1,200ft/365metres of climbing up the fell, with no paths to follow, which makes for even harder going up a steep fell. We eventually reached the top after 40 minutes of hard going and made our way to the summit cairn at 1,775ft/541metres.
The top of Lank Rigg.jpg
The top of Lank Rigg

Lank Rigg summit.JPG
Lank Rigg summit

Caw Fell as seen from Lank Rigg.jpg
Caw Fell as seen from Lank Rigg

After leaving the summit we then went off in a northerly direction for a while and then once again turned west following the course of Whoap Beck to Greengill Tongue and then on to the main road and back to the car park at Scaly Moss.
This was a good walk though a hard one due to the climbing done and the distance walked. The weather was good throughout with the sun shining which made it hot and thirsty work at times. We did get a breeze now and again which was most welcome. The views are very good though they were spoilt slightly due to the hazy conditions.
Unfortunately I no longer have the pleasure of my trusty four legged companion as he decided to leave me at the grand old age of 13 years.
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trailmasher
Walker
 
Posts: 1126
Munros:11   
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Re: Grike to Lank Rigg and stuff in between.

Postby johnkaysleftleg » Mon Jan 19, 2015 9:29 am

Nice quiet part of the Lakes that. Also nice to see just what Grike, Crag Fell and Lank Rigg look like, could barely see 5 meters when I bagged them.
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johnkaysleftleg
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Posts: 3034
Munros:25   Corbetts:10
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Joined: Jan 28, 2009
Location: County Durham

Re: Grike to Lank Rigg and stuff in between.

Postby trailmasher » Mon Jan 19, 2015 8:29 pm

I must have the luck of the Irish as I've been in that neck of the woods 3 times and always had good weather. I hate it when I can't see how far away the top is :(
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trailmasher
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Posts: 1126
Munros:11   
Hewitts:180
Wainwrights:214   
Joined: Nov 26, 2014
Location: Near Appleby - Cumbria

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