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Silver How to Blea Rigg amble.

Silver How to Blea Rigg amble.


Postby trailmasher » Tue Mar 17, 2015 10:06 pm

Wainwrights included on this walk: Blea Rigg, Silver How

Date walked: 16/03/2015

Time taken: 4.09

Distance: 15.83 km

Ascent: 774m

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Silver How Birketts.gpx Open full screen  NB: Walkhighlands is not responsible for the accuracy of gpx files in users posts


1 - Silver How from the A591 lay-by.JPG
Silver How from the A591 lay-by.

2 - Helm Crag from the A591 lay-by.JPG
Helm Crag from the A591 lay-by.

I parked the car on the lay-by which is on the A591 just to the northwest of Grasmere and walked down the road heading into the village for around 400 metres before taking the footpath on the right hand side and taking me around Butharlyp Howe following the River Rothay until it met up with Easedale Beck where the path swings south to meet the Easedale Road.

Turning right for a short distance I then picked up the path which leads along to Allan Bank but turning off north to follow the short tarmac road leading up to the last cottage before the intake wall. From there it's through the gate and following the wall which after a short while turns into an old walled cart track. Stoney and wet underfoot this track leads up to the intake wall and the gateway to the fells proper.
3 - Gateway to the fells.JPG
Gateway to the fells.

4-A hazy view of Stone Arthur.JPG
A hazy view of Stone Arthur.

From the gate it is a short but fairly steep climb first of all on grass and then as one gets higher the path has washed out to form a stoney stretch before reaching the small copse of Junipers. All of this time I am climbing steadily in a south west direction and heading for Wray Gill. On I go passing a second clump of Junipers before reaching the gill which is in a rather deep cutting with various trees and shrubs clinging to the sides.
5-A view over Grasmere.JPG
A view over Grasmere.

As with a lot of the paths this one has got badly eroded around the gill and though crossing the gill isn't a problem getting up the far side may be for some people as it is now mostly rock of the shaly kind which proves to be slippery when wet. From leaving the gill and now heading south, a steady gradient and another 550 metres will find you on the summit of Silver How.
6-Loughrigg from Silver How summit.JPG
Loughrigg from Silver How summit.

7-Grasmere and Rydal Water looking from Silver How.JPG
Grasmere and Rydal Water from Silver How.

8-Grasmere under the Fairfield Round ridge.JPG
Grasmere under the Fairfield Round ridge.

9-Lang How and the Langdales from Silver How.JPG
Lang How and the Langdales from Silver How.

The path from Silver How now goes off in a north westerly direction and skirting the edges of Brigstone Moss until passing under the craggy face of Lang How. A short trip to the top and along it before dropping back down to the main path which meanders between the various lumps, humps, and bumps but always in a more or less north westerly direction to then come across Swinescar Pike.
10-Looking to Swinescar Pike from Lang How.JPG
Swinescar Pike from Lang How.

11-The view into Langdale from Lang How top.JPG
The view into Langdale from Lang How top.

16-Swinescar Pike from Lang How.JPG
Swinescar Pike from Lang How.

There are quite a few people about today which is surprising for a Monday and two in particular I bring to mind. One was a very elderly gentleman who was having a rest when I caught up with him below Wray Gill and who was going as far as Blea Rigg and from there maybe into Langdale or down to Easedale Tarn, couldn't make his mind up. The other chap was also of a good age, had done plenty of walking including the Alps, etc and who had had a triple by-pass, and was still walking quite strongly. I met him at Silver How whilst he was on his way to Langdale - probably the Olde Dungeon Ghyll - and was waving his smart phone around trying to get a signal. You've just got to admire these fellows for their get up and go. Some people just can't be stopped.

It has forecast rain showers for today but so far there has not been a hint of rain. I was going to drop off to Easedale Tarn from Blea Rigg but thought that I may as well take advantage of the weather and head a little further.
13-Swinescar Pike.JPG
Swinescar Pike.

There are quite a few people approaching Swinescar Pike and looks like it is going to become rather crowded up here so I moved on and headed for Raw Pike heading slightly more north for a while before turning west again and then making my way to the top of the afore mentioned top.
14-Raw Pike.JPG
Raw Pike.

12-A barren landscape.JPG
A barren landscape.

It's looking quite barren up here today with the grey skies, black crags, and brown vegetation but after all we're still in the throes of winter. Leaving Raw Pike I made my way across to Blea Rigg passing a stone built shelter/bivvy on the way which would just about accommodate two people. Crossed over the top of it - Blea Rigg that is - left there and found a place to park up and have my lunch.
15-Blea Rigg.JPG
Blea Rigg.

17-Lingmoor Fell and Side Pike.JPG
Lingmoor Fell and Side Pike.

19-Easedale Tarn from Blea Rigg.JPG
Easedale Tarn from Blea Rigg.

20-Bit of a bivvy on Blea Rigg.JPG
Bit of a bivvy on Blea Rigg.

21-Anyone home.JPG
Anyone home.

22-Blea Rigg top.JPG
Blea Rigg top.

23-Pavey Ark-Loft Crag-Pike of Stickle.JPG
Pavey Ark-Loft Crag-Pike of Stickle.

Now stoked up I set off and headed for the cairn which is at the head of the path leading down the gulley, passing between Belles Knott and Eagle Crag whilst making its way down, above, and to the south of Codale Tarn. Although the path is paved in a few places it can be said that the majority of it could possibly do with a bit of attention, especially in the higher reaches.
In the past I have come down this way in a thunderstorm and it does make for a wet passage, a bit like gill scrambling in a way.
25-On the way down to Easedale Tarn.JPG
On the way down to Easedale Tarn.

27-Belles Knott.JPG
Belles Knott.

Well it's a long drop off from the top to Grasmere but the cares of scrambling down the rocky bits of path wiles away the time and at least there is a fair panorama in front to be looking at when not having to watch where the feet go, i.e not walking. Whilst alongside Easedale Tarn I met a chap on his way up, high vis coat on, plastic bag in hand. I actually thought that he was litter picking for the National Trust or some other organisation but no, his bag had a couple of magazines, food and drink in it.
I stopped to have a word with him and asked him where he was heading for. "Not sure," says he before dashing off in a westerly direction. Didn't see any signs of temporary accommodation on my way down so don't know what that was about.
As I got to Sourmilk Gill it started raining hard enough to don the over trousers, but it only lasted for around a half hour so I considered myself fortunate not to be caught on the high fells and two hours from the car. The visibility has been a bit sort of hazy today. Not just clear enough to see the distant fells properly but at least the mist didn't drop down as I thought that it might do at one point.
It has been a decent but cloudy day out with calm, dry conditions. A bit wet underfoot in places but then again always is up here, even in summer.
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trailmasher
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Re: Silver How to Blea Rigg amble.

Postby ChrisW » Wed Mar 18, 2015 10:24 pm

Really enjoyed this Trailmasher, great report :clap: That shot titled 'The Gateway to the Fells' really reminded me of home.
had had a triple by-pass, and was still walking quite strongly


I agree you have to admire these guys....but damn I'd be concerned about something happening so far from help :shock: Then agian, if you're going to go anyway, why not go doing something you love :wink:

Lovely shots bringing me all the way home from my sunny afternoon in Canada :clap:
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ChrisW
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Re: Silver How to Blea Rigg amble.

Postby trailmasher » Thu Mar 19, 2015 2:12 pm

ChrisW wrote:Really enjoyed this Trailmasher, great report :clap: That shot titled 'The Gateway to the Fells' really reminded me of home.
had had a triple by-pass, and was still walking quite strongly


I agree you have to admire these guys....but damn I'd be concerned about something happening so far from help :shock: Then agian, if you're going to go anyway, why not go doing something you love :wink:

Lovely shots bringing me all the way home from my sunny afternoon in Canada :clap:

Thanks for your comments Chris and it was as bleak as it looks on the photos. Could do with a bit of your sunshine just now help dry things up a bit. And you're right about having an incident, but would rather go on the fells than be run over by a big red bus or similar!! :crazy:
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trailmasher
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Posts: 1126
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