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Rossett Pike and two close neighbours.

Rossett Pike and two close neighbours.


Postby trailmasher » Fri Jun 19, 2015 3:06 pm

Wainwrights included on this walk: Rosset Pike

Hewitts included on this walk: Rossett Pike

Date walked: 03/06/2015

Time taken: 4.13

Distance: 16.84 km

Ascent: 737m

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Rossett Pike and 2 x Birketts.gpx Open full screen  NB: Walkhighlands is not responsible for the accuracy of gpx files in users posts


The weather was decent enough when I set out on the 3rd June - Wednesday - at 9:45 from the small car park in the heart of Stonethwaite. Warm and cloudy with some blue showing, but a brisk cool breeze just knocked the edge off the comfort of walking without a fleece on. I had a feeling that I would be wearing the fleece all day as I'm only going higher and Langstrath itself is wide open with little or no shelter from the wind.

My mission today is to pick off two Birkett's whilst on my way to Rossett Pike, a hill I have been on quite a number times in the past whilst passing by these two lower hills which overlook the green and pleasant lands of Langdale and its surrounding mountains. It is a most beautiful picture indeed.

As I posted a report a few weeks ago about my travels through Langstrath whilst on my quest for the Pack Woman's grave I will not repeat my dialogue regarding my journey from Stonethwaite to the top of Stake Pass but may make some comments as to this new walk through the valley. The last time I came this way I made my way up Stake Pass and then down into Langdale from where I then climbed back up to Rossett Pike via Rossett Gill and made my way down the path over Mansey Pike and back to Stake Pass to more or less retrace my steps back to the car.

This route is slightly different and less demanding than the previous one.

Leaving Stonethwaite I followed the well made track along the west side of Langstrath Beck as last time, but due to the rain the night before there was quite a number of large wet areas covering the track. I passed Alinsongrass Hoghouse…
1 - Alisongrass Hoghouse and Eagle Crag.JPG
Alisongrass Hoghouse and Eagle Crag.

with Eagle Crag sat behind it and as I got nearer to the crag I couldn't help but take a picture of it with a mass of Bluebells in the foreground to give a bit of interest.
2 - Bluebells - Bleak How - Eagle Crag.JPG
Bluebells - Bleak How - Eagle Crag.

As I turned into Langstrath itself Johnny House comes into view overlooked by Eagle Crag, Heron Crag, and Sergeant Crag.

Apart from the water laying on the track up to Blackmoss Pot and the path from there to Stake Pass nothing has changed since my last visit.
3 - The path at Johnny House leading into Langstrath.JPG
The path at Johnny House leading into Langstrath.

4 - Woof Stones - Cam Crag and Black Wall to the left.JPG
Woof Stones - Cam Crag and Black Wall to the left.

5 - A peaceful scene by Blackmoss Pot in Langstrath.JPG
A peaceful scene by Blackmoss Pot in Langstrath.

6 - Blackmoss Pot from the west bank.JPG
Blackmoss Pot from the west bank.

7 - Stake Beck alongside Stake Pass.JPG
Stake Beck alongside Stake Pass.

The steady climb up Stake Pass is of a similar nature apart from Stake Beck being a bit busier due to the overnight rain. I reached the top of the pass without incident whilst once again enjoying the views down the valley but this time instead of continuing on and descending into Langdale I turned south west past the unnamed tarn and made my way around until slowly turning into a south east direction and making my way along the easy slope that climbs up the ridge behind Mansey Pike.
9 - Looking across Langdale Combe to Rossett Pike-Esk Pike-Bow Fell.JPG
Looking across Langdale Combe to Rossett Pike - Esk Pike - Bow Fell.

10 - Looking into Langdale from Mansey Pike.JPG
Looking into Langdale from Mansey Pike.

The path along this stretch is good with the usual stony areas along with some washed out and wet peaty places that need to be got around but don't generally present a problem. As I neared the first object of my desire I turned off at a convenient spot and headed north east to cross the grassy ground and climb the rock strewn bank to the summit of Black Crag at 588 metres. The top is grassy with just four stones laid out as a miserable apology for a cairn but with wonderful views down the length of Langdale.
11 - The view into Langdale from Black Crag.JPG
The view into Langdale from Black Crag.

12 - Buck Pike with Bow Fell behind from Black Crag.JPG
Buck Pike with Bow Fell behind from Black Crag.

From Black Crag and following a narrow path I dropped off south east down to the head of Little Gill before leaving the path and walking across a stretch of grass and working my way up and between the many small rocks that litter the fell side to reach the summit at 606 metres. The top is once again grassy with thousands of rocks of various sizes and shape but all remain the same colour of grey. From here there are once again good views in all directions with Bow Fell dominating the southern aspect. The small cairn consists of a few fragments of brown stained rock which are in stark contrast to the naturally grey colour of all the others. Maybe that's why they were chosen.
13 - High Raise-Sergeant Man-Thunacar Knott-Langdale Pikes from Buck Pike.JPG
High Raise - Sergeant Man - Thunacar Knott - Langdale Pikes from Buck Pike.

17 - Rossett Pike in front of Bow Fell view from Buck Pike.JPG
Rossett Pike in front of Bow Fell viewed from Buck Pike.

As I leave here I once again picked up the narrow path which led me to the summit of Rossett Pike at 651 metres.
14 - Allen Crags and Glaramara from Rossett Pike.JPG
Allen Crags and Glaramara from Rossett Pike.

It has been mentioned that the pack woman's grave can be seen from here. Yes it can, but to do so it is necessary to clamber down roughly east to the lower unnamed but cairned secondary top of Rossett Pike. It took me quite a while to spot it which was surprising really especially with me knowing more or less where to cast my eyes. This is also where I had my lunch.

When at this lower cairn it is possible to look along the length of the crags that run under the three tops and all the way along to Mansey Pike and into Langdale Combe.

Despite the previous night's rain and the chance of struggling to cross Angletarn Gill in its lower reaches I now took the usual path from Rossett Pike down to Angle Tarn…
15 - The mist dropping over Angle Tarn and Esk Pike.JPG
The mist dropping over Angle Tarn and Esk Pike.

from where I then turned south east and took the faint path which runs downhill alongside Angletarn Gill.
16 - The path from Angle Tarn to Tongue Head in Langstrath.JPG
The path from Angle Tarn to Tongue Head in Langstrath.

This path is quite steep in places with some dodgy ground where it has eroded. There is one section around 5 metres long which has collapsed altogether leaving a deep trench that requires a work around.

The gill is fairly wide and very rocky and I wondered if I could get across without getting my feet wet, but as the water wasn't too bad I presumed that a few hours of dry weather and maybe the outflow from the tarn helped to regulate the flow of water down it.

History tells me that a good place to cross is about 30 metres down from the last tree before reaching Allencrags Gill. The rocks at that point are fairly large and easy to stand on with minimum chance of slipping into the gill and reaching Blackmoss Pot earlier than anticipated. As you get further down the gill quite a number of smaller ones intersect which makes it all the harder to cross when in spate.

As the valley bottom is reached and just below Tongue Head Angletarn Gill joins up with Allencrags Gill…
18 - The view into Tongue Head and Allen Crags from the bank of Allencrag Gill.JPG
The view into Tongue Head and Allen Crags from the bank of Allencrag Gill.

to form the much larger Langstrath Beck.
19 - Looking down Allencrag Gill into Langstrath.JPG
Looking down Allencrag Gill into Langstrath.

20 - Looking back up Langstrath towards Tongue Head and Esk Pike.JPG
Looking back up Langstrath towards Tongue Head and Esk Pike.

It is also at this point where the water rushes into a fairly deep and rocky sided ravine for quite some distance until opening up again into the wide Langstrath Beck which runs down the full length of the valley until finally becoming Stonethwaite Beck as it makes its way past Smithymire Island to run down through Rosthwaite and then finally into Derwent Water.

Initially the path follows the south bank of the beck and is clear to see but this path seems to have mind of its own, as every time I come this way I seem to lose it amongst the grass. This time was no exception. The path can be very clear and then all of a sudden you notice that it's gone missing. Where to you think. But I sort of sussed out that when it finally departs from view that if you look over to your right you will be sure to see it plain as day just a few metres away. On you go, merrily striding along on a clear path and then the same thing happens again. Look to your right and there it is. This method of path finding continues until just before the footbridge is reached at the bottom of Stake Pass.

There are two fords shown on the OS map just near where Angletarn Gill meets up with Allencrags Gill which would be to pick up the path which is shown on the north west bank. To cross over the beck at any of these points would require a wet suit or a zip wire but can be crossed much further downstream when a likely place is found.

Langstrath Beck is long and wide, with the odd shallow pitched waterfall and runs peacefully along with sheep grazing on both sides. Langstrath is aptly named and is as its name implies, a long valley.
21 - Looking down Langstrath towards Great Crag with Sergeant Crag and Eagle Crag to the right.JPG
Looking down Langstrath towards Great Crag with Sergeant Crag and Eagle Crag to the right.

It is wide, long, and very peaceful with no human habitation to be seen once Johnny House has been passed. The paths through this valley were once part of the great collection of packhorse routes that made their way around the mountains passes and valley bottoms. This one linking up with the ones that ran into Langdale, Wasdale, Eskdale, and of course back into Rosthwaite and so on into Keswick.
22 - A young womping willow maybe.JPG
A decrepit womping willow maybe.

The path along the west side of Langstrath Beck from Stake Pass to Stonethwaite was described in my earlier post so I will not dwell on this section again only to endorse that it is a far more interesting though rougher path than the one on the east side.

Passing by Blackmoss Pot…
23 - Blackmoss Pot from the east bank of Langstrath Beck.JPG
Blackmoss Pot from the east bank of Langstrath Beck.


As I walked along Thick Side the large monolith of rock called Blea Rock…
24 - Blea Rock.JPG
Blea Rock.

with its lone tree/shrub on top of it stands towering over the path which is quite rocky at this point.

I soon walked in the shadow of Bull Crag, Lamper Knott, Sergeant's Crag, Heron Crag, and Bleak How with Eagle Crag towering behind. It is just a short distance now to the footbridge at Smithymire Island and the Greenup Edge path which will take me back to Stonethwaite Bridge and the car.
25 - The Greenup Edge path with Eagle Crag to the right.JPG
The Greenup Edge path with Eagle Crag to the right.

All in all a decent walk and one in which I hope I haven't repeated too much of the previous report of my being in this neck of the woods. The weather has been good all day but as predicted at the outset a cool, brisk breeze blowing all day. There were some sunny periods one of which appeared over Langdale at the appropriate moment whilst I was on Black Crag.
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trailmasher
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Re: Rossett Pike and two close neighbours.

Postby ChrisW » Sun Jun 21, 2015 9:46 pm

Beautiful shots of a lovely hike Trailmasher, I wouldn't care if you posted this one once a month :clap:

this path seems to have mind of its own, as every time I come this way I seem to lose it amongst the grass. This time was no exception. The path can be very clear and then all of a sudden you notice that it's gone missing. Where to you think. But I sort of sussed out that when it finally departs from view that if you look over to your right you will be sure to see it plain as day just a few metres away. On you go, merrily striding along on a clear path and then the same thing happens again. Look to your right and there it is.


I know that feeling mate...this accurately describes almost all of my hikes :lol:
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ChrisW
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Re: Rossett Pike and two close neighbours.

Postby trailmasher » Mon Jun 22, 2015 2:18 pm

ChrisW wrote:Beautiful shots of a lovely hike Trailmasher, I wouldn't care if you posted this one once a month :clap:

this path seems to have mind of its own, as every time I come this way I seem to lose it amongst the grass. This time was no exception. The path can be very clear and then all of a sudden you notice that it's gone missing. Where to you think. But I sort of sussed out that when it finally departs from view that if you look over to your right you will be sure to see it plain as day just a few metres away. On you go, merrily striding along on a clear path and then the same thing happens again. Look to your right and there it is.


I know that feeling mate...this accurately describes almost all of my hikes :lol:


Thanks Chris :D , there is so much to photograph in that neck of the woods its a hard choice as what to post sometimes :? and re the path. Seen nowt like it. You follow it and see no paths veering away to the right and then bingo, its gone. :crazy:
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trailmasher
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