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A sleepover at Black Sail Hostel. Day 1.

A sleepover at Black Sail Hostel. Day 1.


Postby trailmasher » Sat Jun 27, 2015 8:37 pm

Wainwrights included on this walk: High Crag, High Stile, Red Pike (Buttermere)

Hewitts included on this walk: High Crag, High Stile, Red Pike (Buttermere)

Date walked: 08/06/2015

Time taken: 2.52

Distance: 10.71 km

Ascent: 945m

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If anyone finds the first few paragraph's a meaningless ramble please pass them by and berate me for waffling on too much.

The mileage for the 1st day should have been 14.48 kilometres (9 miles) but we missed out Pillar.

If I may I - and without going on too long - would like to relate the history of how this walk came about.

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I suppose that this walk really started in May of 2011 when I began walking the 167 kilometre/104 miles and 10,668 metres/35,000feet Wainwright Memorial Walk with my Glaswegian and sometimes drinking partner, Peter. I had read about this walk in 'The Wainwright Memorial Walk' book which he - AW - did with three friends in 1931.

Initially I had planned to do this walk - the Memorial Walk - by myself and take the opportunity to raise some money for the MS Society when Peter said that he would also like to give it 'a go' and raise some money along with me. Apart from the usual acts of walking in the normal throes of living he had never been on a fell before in his life. After explaining in great detail what this walk entailed he was still enthusiastic to give it a go, and as he said 'it will be the longest pub crawl in the country' who was I to argue against such a secondary challenge as this.

The book recommends eleven days to complete the walk but as Peter is employed on some rusting hulk of an oil rig somewhere offshore and his time onshore is limited we had to do it in nine days.

Boots, bag, waterproofs, etc, were duly purchased and off we went on two training walks. One up to Cross Fell from Blencarn and the other over Allen Crags and Glaramara in the pouring rain starting from Seathwaite. This will change his mind I thought, but no, he loved it.

And the job got done.

The next few paragraphs are just a rundown of who is now going on this walk, when we first met, health and safety, and route details of which most was done in the local hostelry. It is not a requirement to read them so please skip if you're of a mind to get to the details of the walk route.

Fast forward now to Christmas 2014, when after having a drink or two Peter proposed that we should maybe think about having a couple of days walking and, as he had enjoyed our previous stay at Black Sail Hostel so much that it should once again be our accommodation for the night and could I sort out a couple of days walking around the area. Bear in mind he hasn't put his foot on a fell in four years and his boots will probably be all dried up, bent, and cracked through neglect of duty. We chatted about it over a couple of more drinks and after another couple or so drinks the idea was becoming more attractive. Two more and I was bought.

Remember now that Peter works offshore which made the organising of this jolly up somewhat difficult as he is one of those persons who doesn't heartily respond to emails. I need dates so that the hostel can be booked. Not too early as we want decent weather, not too late as Black Sail is popular and is also on the Coast to Coast route. June is selected as a good an option as any. The weather should be decent and we have plenty of daylight hours to play with should anything go amiss. The 8th and 9th of June are now written in stone.

Suddenly there is a change of plan. There are two more candidates who would like to accompany us. Both are young and fit, but also none walkers. Daniel is a hairdresser but does a lot of biking; Sam is in sales and plays football. Yes, fit, but hill walking! OK we'll take 'em on then. All of a sudden there is a rush of people to join the walk. Now we have Brian who is an electrician from Glasgow - met him once - Keith from Glasgow, a bricklayer - known as Murphy and never met him - Billy, also from Glasgow - facilities manager for ScotRail - never met him, and last of all Chris a workmate of Peter's - never met him.

Then there were eight. Peter who has walked a total of eleven days on the fells in four years, Daniel, Sam, and Chris, done none. Billy I believe has done quite a bit but not for a while, and finally Brian and Murphy who have done - again, I am led to believe - a lot of river bank walks. Their walking history wasn't broached upon during our two days together although I'm quite sure that if, and when they read this report I shall be put straight in no uncertain terms. Ah! The wonder of Facebook, Twitter, etc.

Sunday 7th June, the Meeting.

E and I are ready. We are standing by for a broadside from persons unknown who are expected to arrive at around 7:30pm. Garage stocked up with beer and whiskey at the ready. Sleeping arrangements made about the house for the overnight stay before leaving for Buttermere at 7:30am Monday morning. Being short on single beds the gay lord's can sleep together in the doubles whilst the others can fight for couches and floor space.

The first to arrive are the lads from Glasgow, three of them, Brian, Billy, and Keith, aka Murphy. Peter now lives in Redcar as do Daniel and Sam, whilst Chris hales from Middlesbrough, shame eh, so they will join us soon.

The door bell rings, I open the door and am immediately met with a bunch of flowers and a box of Roses which are in all intents and purposes being offered to me. But then I see the eyes of the generous donor looking over my shoulder and then thrusting them past me and into the hands of E. Must watch this one, young, handsome, lithe, unruly hair, and welcoming smile. Bet he's got a woman behind every pallet of bricks.

It's not long before the other four turn up and are welcomed into the house. The regulation kisses and man hugs over, sleeping arrangements sorted out between themselves, and a couple of drinks later we make our way the short distance up the road to the local inn for the final fine tuning of the details of the walk.

After the first drink all thoughts of the walk went out of the head as male bonding and the consuming of copious amounts of alcohol took precedence over anything else. We can now skip the following hours apart from the last 15 minutes which is when one member of the group decided to clear up any remaining and non-consumed glasses of whiskey. Count to ten, a large thud, a cheer, and macho man is out cold on the floor. He's a big lad and it was a bit of a struggle to get him up but with the landlord advising us that we'd be better off with a wheelbarrow we got one or two to each corner of him and carted him the short distance back to the house where he was promptly thrown in one of the cars for the night as nobody was game to try and get him upstairs with the risk of not being able to father children again.

The morning after.

The original intention was to leave the house at 7:30am with the chance of arriving at Buttermere for around 8:30am and to start walking by around 8:45am. Unfortunately and for reasons described above we were a little late in getting away. The lads had brought a rake of food with them so whilst awaiting the lingerers knocked up their fare for the day ahead.

Macho man is now on his feet and looking a little bewildered as to how he managed to spend the night in a car. He'll figure it out as the day goes on.

We're on our way and arrive at Buttermere via Borrowdale and the Honister Pass at around 9:30am parking up at the village church car park. Despite the events of last night everyone is surprisingly perky as we get ready for what is for most of them their first day on the high fells and hopefully an enjoyable and event free day for all.

The intended route was to do the High Stile range, drop down into Ennerdale and take on Pillar from the front north face via Shamrock and thence to the summit. But it all depends on how things are when we get into Ennerdale.

Leaving the car park…
2 - The group ready for the off at Buttermere Church car park.JPG
The group ready for the off at Buttermere Church car park.

we walked down the road and through the tiny village, past the Bridge and Fish Hotel's and picked up the wide lanes leading across to Buttermere lake, crossed the footbridge over Buttermere Dubbs and immediately took to the paved path on the right which leads steeply up through Burtness Wood.
6 - Burtness Wood path.JPG
Burtness Wood path.

The path is well made and paved all the way up through the wood up to the stile in the forestry fence, and apart from the higher reaches being of the usual stony kind continues in this vein most of the way up and across Old Burtness.
9 - Buttermere and Fleetwith Pike from Old Burtness.JPG
Buttermere and Fleetwith Pike from Old Burtness.

10 - Crummock Water - Mellbreak - Grasmoor from the side of Sourmilk Gill.JPG
Crummock Water - Mellbreak - Grasmoor from the side of Sourmilk Gill.

The last few metres leading up to Bleaberry Tarn is across rock strewn grass and can be messy when wet.
11 - Buttermere Village from just below Bleaberry Tarn.JPG
Buttermere Village from just below Bleaberry Tarn.

54 - Bleaberry Tarn and Red Pike.jpg
Bleaberry Tarn and Red Pike.

It was just before we reached the tarn that a sheepdog joined our company which, we thought belonged to some people coming up behind us. It didn't, but as one of the group decided to make a fuss of it she, yes she, as was later established decided to tag along with us for a while.

So far, so good and we decide to have a short break by the tarn before tackling the next hill. Everyone seems alright but I note one or two looking askance at Red Pike when I point the way across the tumble down dry stone wall and the steep path beyond. This is where the going gets a bit harder. True to its name Red Pike is made up of a reddish coloured soil and stones of which there is an abundance of on leaving Bleaberry Tarn for the summit of Red Pike. This must be one of the most tedious scrambles in the Lake District with loose stones and scree from the outset. The path from the tarn is steep and slippery all the way up. The higher we get the rougher the ground until finally the obvious path peters out into the full width screes of the final 100 metres or so to the summit.

The lads are doing alright scrambling about and trying to work out the easiest route available to the top. I'm keeping my eye on things from close on the back as there are one or two lagging behind. I decide to take one up the right hand side where the going is a little easier with some small clumps of grass and the odd place to stop comfortably for a breather. One of the party who had moved around to the left where the scree leads into a small gully or two has now re-appeared way back down the fell for some reason. He was having trouble with one of his poles and I wondered if a part of it had come adrift and he had gone back down for it. Boy, he must like climbing. I shouted down to him to check that he was alright and he stuck his arm up in response and then proceeded to climb back up and reached the top in a matter of minutes, sweating and a bit non-plussed as to his decision to go back down. I think that the loose scree, open aspect, and the unexpected feeling of being at height just fazed him a bit, but he was fine after this and continued without any problems for the rest of the day.
13 - The view over Dodd from Red Pike.JPG
The view over Dodd from Red Pike.

16 - Bleaberry Tarn with Dale Head - Hindscarth - Robinson behind.JPG
Bleaberry Tarn with Dale Head - Hindscarth - Robinson behind.

Everybody had a well earned break at the top which had a good few people on it when we arrived. It was a warm day, cloudy with some sun and a bit muggy as I reminded everyone to make sure that they drank enough as they were probably somewhat dehydrated from the night before's activities in the pub. Macho man is holding up well enough.
17 - High Stile from Red Pike.JPG
High Stile from Red Pike.

The sheepdog has been interrogated and having examined her tag found out her name, which is Tess who resides at Wilkinsyke Farm - the ice cream parlour in Buttermere - and upon reading the second tag on her collar decided that she must make a habit of this stalking of itinerant groups of walkers as inscribed upon it were the words, 'If I follow you please send me back'. We're on Red Pike, it's been fussed over, and after having had its third degree Murphy has just given it something to eat!! I suspect it's not the last we've seen of this one.

Breathing normally again we set off on the easy to follow path along to High Stile our next and second top crossing over the top of Chapel Crags in the process. When it's misty and if there is any doubt as to the way across the ridge if the old metal fence posts are followed then they will guide and take you all the way to High Crag and Gamlin End which is the way down to Scarth Gap.
19 - Looking back to Red Pike.JPG
Looking back to Red Pike.

Following the path from Red Pike across the rough and rock strewn ground it begins to gently rise until after following the cairns the summit of High Stile is attained.
21 - High Stile summit.JPG
High Stile summit.

As from all the other tops on this ridge the views are tremendous in all directions, from Mellbreak, Hen Comb, etc in the west, to Grasmoor to the north…
22 - Grasmoor - Crag Hill - Wandhope - Whiteless Pike from High Stile.JPG
Grasmoor - Crag Hill - Wandhope - Whiteless Pike from High Stile.

over Dale Head in the east, and behind us to the south is Pillar, Red Pike Wasdale, Kirk Fell, and of course Great Gable.

Tess is still with us.

Next on is High Crag as we leave High Stile and pass over Eagle Crag and Comb Crags and the view into Burtness Comb from which I once gained access to both High Stile and High Crag but on two separate occasions, it being easier than what the map portrays.
26 - Passing over the top of White Cove.JPG
Passing over the top of White Cove.

27 - A view of Pillar from above White Cove.JPG
A view of Pillar from above White Cove.

28 - Looking down Ennerdale from above White Cove.JPG
Looking down Ennerdale from above White Cove.

The path drops about 90 metres to then rise a mere 25 or 30 metres to the summit of High Crag.
29 - High Crag in sight.JPG
High Crag in sight.

We enjoy the views awhile as drinks are consumed before setting off for Seat by leaving the ridge at Gamlin End.
31 - At the top of Gamlin End from High Crag.JPG
At the top of Gamlin End from High Crag.

The path from the top of Gamlin End is seriously steep and slippery with loose scree beneath the feet for most of the way down.

Stopping to regroup and a well earned break in the small hollow after the steep descent and just before we pass over Seat, Tess is still with us. I mentioned that once we get to Scarth Gap she would probably leave us and make her way home as it's only a short distance to the farm and that she obviously knows her way around the fells being a sheepdog and local to the area. Then Billy threw it some pork. This was followed by Murphy's benevolent donation of chicken, and then the gift of a meat pie. Such generous and soft hearted new friends I've made, think I, as I inwardly groan and know that we now have a ninth member included in the group and who, up to now, has been the best fed of us all. The bitch.

Passing over Seat the path is really no better until the lower section down and across the grassy slope is reached where a short section has been paved. Not having been on ground of this nature before the group was understandably very cautious as this is very different from the easy walking along the ridge, and the merits of having and using poles were much appreciated.
32 - Haystacks view from Seat.JPG
Haystacks from Seat.

33 - Looking back over Seat to High Crag and Gamlin End.JPG
Looking back over Seat to High Crag and Gamlin End.

I mildly and humorously berated one of the younger members for walking on the grass whilst cutting corners on the zigzag sections of path to which he looked slightly bemused until I explained to him why some of the paths are in a serious condition due to such practices. 'How can you not walk on grass in the LD he asks?' So I patiently explain that there is grass to walk on and some you don't, which means sticking to the obvious paths where and whenever possible.

After being in the fresh air, watered and well fed, and with plenty of exercise to boot, Macho man is now on top form. He's going well.

We arrive at Scarth Gap with Haystacks towering in front and over us, the Lower Gatescarth and Buttermere path to our left - or north - but our way leads south for a short distance - roughly 20 to 25 metres depending where you are at the Gap - before picking up an initially faint track on the right which will take you above and behind the old Dub's Quarry and across the scree's in a roughly west direction but falling towards the Memorial Bridge which is over the River Liza and leads to the climbers path and Pillar. This path is good with some scree to pass over, but apart from that the path has no hidden extras apart from two fences to scale using the worn out stiles. The OS map is out of date as it shows the path running through two areas of pine forest but if truth be known the only bit of woodland is now in the bottom reaches after passing over the second fence.

Tess is still with us.

The Memorial Bridge is reached and as we wait for the back markers the ones with me are looking at Pillar in awe. Yes, it's big, and must look unusually so to someone who is new to the fells. From where we stand there is no obvious way of ascent, even up to the Climber's Traverse. This is where choices have to be made. It's now around 3:15pm, the hostel - Black Sail - is open for drinks, toilet, etc, but is only manned - or womaned in this case - from 5:30pm whilst food at the hostel is served at around 7pm. The rest of the group arrive and join in the ooh's and aah's whilst feet are shuffled in the dirt of the forestry road.

I explain to them what the climb entails; point out the route which is not obvious from where we are stood. The way across Shamrock and the subsequent climb up to the summit, which, though not hard may not be every ones cup of tea. Each and every one appear keen to do it, but as I think back to Red Pike, the time of day, the time it would take us to complete along with - nobody admitting to - tired feet and limbs it may be prudent to pass it by this time and pick it up some other day when we could make it the sole object of our desire. I, personally have done this route three times in the past so know what is required, Peter, my Glaswegian and sometimes drinking partner has been up it so is not fussed. I don't want to split the group up so reminding them of the alternatives the braver ones of the group admitted that maybe the feet was aching, a few pains in the shoulders, etc. That's good; I admire them for that as we all know that it's hard to be the first one to admit that maybe they've had enough for the day.

I'm pleased as the feeling ran through some of the group. I knew it was disappointing for the ones who were alright but there was no way I was going to split the group up even though the hostel is only about a mile or so up the forestry road. As we're always being told 'we're all in it together'.

We made our way leisurely up the track with the sun beating down on us and before too long Black Sail, that hostelry icon of the lakes appeared in the distance like a welcome ship to a stranded sailor.
38 - Approaching Black Sail Hostel.JPG
Approaching Black Sail Hostel.

As predicted the dormitories were locked whilst the common room, toilets, and shower were available. Drinks are available to purchase from the kitchen. DIY drinks of tea and coffee at £1 a shot - wash up afterwards - and small bottles of water for £1.30p each. Honesty box provided. All most welcome if passing by and in need of refreshments.

The numbers of the group are still nine.

We sit around relaxing taking in the sun and talking about the events of the day as other guests arrive from their own day's adventures. The young lady warden arrives at just on 5:30pm and proceeds to unlock the generator and previously locked rooms. Black Sail has been refurbished, albeit sympathetically with smaller eight bed dorms but more of them. Solar panels adorn the rear roof and where possible the roofs have been covered in some kind of compost overlaid with a perforated plastic membrane which forms the anchor for the hardy sedums that are growing on the roof. The kitchen and common room remain as was but I note that new tables are in evidence. A most welcome addition are the soft lights on the front of the building which prove most helpful when a midnight or early morning visit around the corner is needed.
39 - Kirk Fell - Great Gable - Green Gable view from Black Sail Hostel.JPG
Kirk Fell - Great Gable - Green Gable view from Black Sail Hostel.

She - the warden - spies Tess and we explain why, and how, she managed to end up with us. The warden offered to take her back to Buttermere the following morning and that she could be locked up along with water and a blanket in the generator room for the night. That's number nine sorted then.

Once the warden has completed her normal duties it is time to sign in and take advantage of the well stocked bottle bank. There are varied and numerous board games and books to read if one is interested in such pastimes as was made evident by the number of guests - including some of our group - partaking of same. Bottle sales were good that particular evening as a couple or three were consumed before the three course evening meal was served and consumed post haste, followed by visits for more with monotonous regularity until time was called around 9:30pm.

We sat outside as the night drew in with the sun setting and leaving a pinkish glow over Kirk Fell and Great Gable…
49 - Sunset on Kirk Fell - Great Gable - Green Gable.JPG
Sunset on Kirk Fell - Great Gable - Green Gable.

50 - Relaxing after supper.JPG
Relaxing after supper.

as we sipped our drinks to the sound of music from various smart phones. One by one everybody apart from myself and Murphy slipped away to their beds whilst we took full advantage of the peace, quiet, and solitude of the moment. We get to know each other a bit more and music festivals come into the equation. Just at the height of the male bonding moment Murphy flips open his phone and brings up a James Taylor video, just now his favourite one. That's my signal to also creep off to my bunk and lay there listening to the dulcet tones of snoring from different quarters of the room.
53 - 11pm sunset.JPG
11pm sunset down Ennerdale way.

Well that's day one over, with everyone of the group seemingly happy with the day's activities. There may be some stiff limbs in the morning but we'll soon work that out of 'em as they make their way to the next hill.

Tess has kept a low profile today and I suspect that she must be on some wanted list, as apart from appearing at the smell of food she has led the walk since she latched onto us

I shall be posting the Day Two report as soon as I can and can guarantee that it won't be as long as this one is. Honest.
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Re: A sleepover at Black Sail Hostel. Day 1.

Postby ChrisW » Sat Jun 27, 2015 9:20 pm

Make 'em as long as you like Trailmasher, this is fantastic and accompanied by beautiful photos. Congrats to the whole group so far but hats off to Macho Man...my new hero (I wouldn't have got a mile after his night, even if I'd had a bed instead of a car to sleep in) :lol: :lol:
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Re: A sleepover at Black Sail Hostel. Day 1.

Postby Gordie12 » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:56 am

Great read, really enjoyed that.

Also good to see more of the area, I passed through last year on the C2C and stopped at Black Sail for 5 minutes but didn't go in (or check to see if I could?).
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Re: A sleepover at Black Sail Hostel. Day 1.

Postby poppiesrara » Sun Jun 28, 2015 12:47 pm

Really good reading and some great views, Trailmasher - I look forward to the next 8 instalments!
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Re: A sleepover at Black Sail Hostel. Day 1.

Postby trailmasher » Sun Jun 28, 2015 8:38 pm

ChrisW wrote:Make 'em as long as you like Trailmasher, this is fantastic and accompanied by beautiful photos. Congrats to the whole group so far but hats off to Macho Man...my new hero (I wouldn't have got a mile after his night, even if I'd had a bed instead of a car to sleep in) :lol: :lol:


Thanks once again for your comments Chris and yes, the boys did well on their first ever trip to the high fells :clap: . Re Macho Man, his recovery rate is remarkable as well I know from the nine day affair :crazy: :crazy: . But he was tired when we got back to base. Maybe 'The Wimp' would have been appropriate just then :lol: . Stand by for day two.
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Re: A sleepover at Black Sail Hostel. Day 1.

Postby trailmasher » Sun Jun 28, 2015 8:43 pm

Gordie12 wrote:Great read, really enjoyed that.

Also good to see more of the area, I passed through last year on the C2C and stopped at Black Sail for 5 minutes but didn't go in (or check to see if I could?).


There are some great hills around that neck of the woods and all worth a visit if you get the chance :D . As I mentioned, the hostel kitchen and common room is open all day and as long as people leave it clean and tidy after using it I believe it will remain so. And Gordie, thanks for your comments :D
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Re: A sleepover at Black Sail Hostel. Day 1.

Postby trailmasher » Sun Jun 28, 2015 8:52 pm

poppiesrara wrote:Really good reading and some great views, Trailmasher - I look forward to the next 8 instalments!


Thanks for your comments poppiesara :D . This report only covers this two day event I'm sorry to say. The long walk mentioned early on in my report was done 4 years ago and before I knew about WH. Unfortunately the weather was so bad for the whole nine days, high winds, sleet, snow, rain, hail apart from Black Sail to Wasdale via the Mosedale Round where we met up with MiniRambo and Bruv in Wasdale that very few pics were taken. That day was windy but mostly dry until around 7pm.
Thanks again :clap:
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Re: A sleepover at Black Sail Hostel. Day 1.

Postby MiniRambo » Sun Jun 28, 2015 10:38 pm

Cracking report TM - the narrative and photos are top class! :clap: :clap: :clap:
I remember the day very well when we met up with you for the walk over into Wasdale. The weather was really shocking for the time you were on the Memorial Walk, with the only respite being the day we joined you - how lucky were we? :lol: :lol:
Bring on episode two.... :D
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Re: A sleepover at Black Sail Hostel. Day 1.

Postby johnkaysleftleg » Mon Jun 29, 2015 4:14 pm

A very entertaining report. I have experience of a stinking hangover and a steep climb. Set off up Fleetwith Edge feeling very unwell but by the time I dragged myself to the summit I was right as rain. Must be all that wholesome fresh air.
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Re: A sleepover at Black Sail Hostel. Day 1.

Postby trailmasher » Mon Jun 29, 2015 6:48 pm

MiniRambo wrote:Cracking report TM - the narrative and photos are top class! :clap: :clap: :clap:
I remember the day very well when we met up with you for the walk over into Wasdale. The weather was really shocking for the time you were on the Memorial Walk, with the only respite being the day we joined you - how lucky were we? :lol: :lol:
Bring on episode two.... :D


Aye, you were fortunate to get the weather especially as it was your first visit into Wasdale, and who could forget your memorable dash down the screes from Dore Head :lol: . Looking forward to our next meet. :clap:
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Re: A sleepover at Black Sail Hostel. Day 1.

Postby trailmasher » Mon Jun 29, 2015 6:56 pm

johnkaysleftleg wrote:A very entertaining report. I have experience of a stinking hangover and a steep climb. Set off up Fleetwith Edge feeling very unwell but by the time I dragged myself to the summit I was right as rain. Must be all that wholesome fresh air.


Anthony, are you sure that you weren't under the influence of when choosing a route like that to get up Fleetwith Pike that way :roll: . You probably lost the excess alcohol through perspiration battling your way up. It's bad enough coming down it. Thanks for your comments well appreciated :D
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Re: A sleepover at Black Sail Hostel. Day 1.

Postby johnkaysleftleg » Mon Jun 29, 2015 7:37 pm

trailmasher wrote:
johnkaysleftleg wrote:A very entertaining report. I have experience of a stinking hangover and a steep climb. Set off up Fleetwith Edge feeling very unwell but by the time I dragged myself to the summit I was right as rain. Must be all that wholesome fresh air.


Anthony, are you sure that you weren't under the influence of when choosing a route like that to get up Fleetwith Pike that way :roll: . You probably lost the excess alcohol through perspiration battling your way up. It's bad enough coming down it. Thanks for your comments well appreciated :D


One of my favourite ridges is fleetwith edge, plenty of excuses to stop and take photos :D
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Re: A sleepover at Black Sail Hostel. Day 1.

Postby Lone ranger » Wed Jul 15, 2015 10:07 pm

Had a great time with great company, thanks trailmasher can't wait for round 2 in September :D
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Re: A sleepover at Black Sail Hostel. Day 1.

Postby trailmasher » Fri Jul 17, 2015 4:02 pm

Lone ranger wrote:Had a great time with great company, thanks trailmasher can't wait for round 2 in September :D


Thanks Lone Ranger and will keep in touch re dates and who else will be with us etc :wink:
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3 people think this report is great.
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