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Beinn Damh and Beinn na h-Eaglaise

Beinn Damh and Beinn na h-Eaglaise


Postby HalfManHalfTitanium » Wed Dec 30, 2015 2:30 pm

Route description: Beinn Damh (or Ben Damph)

Corbetts included on this walk: Beinn Damh

Grahams included on this walk: Beinn na h-Eaglaise

Date walked: 24/04/2014

Time taken: 12 hours

Distance: 20 km

Ascent: 1200m

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After climbing Beinn Alligin at the start of our week in Kinlochewe, our next target was Beinn Damh. It was a good day, but not a great one: hazy distant views instead of the stunning clarity we'd had on Alligin. But we had one good view of Maol Chean-Dearg beyond the crags of Spidean Coir' an Laoigh. But I wanted to come back and see the Beinn Damh area in clearer weather...
ImageIMG_0002 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
The next day the rest of the party went to Slioch while I rested my knee and I and my son explored the north and south shores of Loch Torridon by bike.
ImageIMG_0003 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
The rollercoaster road to Diabaig was a great experience. In the background from left to right - An Ruadh Stac and the two Beinn Damh summits Spidean Toll nam Biast and Sgurr na Bana Mhoraire.
ImageIMG_0006 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
In Diabaig harbour we discovered a wreck.
ImageIMG_0004 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
As a childhood reader of Famous Five, it was impossible for me to look at a wreck and not go to explore it.
ImageIMG_0005 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
The next day dawned bright and clear. Although I was tempted by Fuar Tholl, the idea of exploring more of the Beinn Damh area was irresistible, even if only for the sake of the enchanting path up through the woods from the Loch Torridon Hotel into Coire Roill.
ImageIMG_0001 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
The waterfall in the ravine looked great.
ImageIMG_0007 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
From the pools and cascades above the waterfall we had a beautiful view back towards Beinn Alligin.
ImageIMG_0008 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
Despite the bright start to the day, cloud was building over the Coulin Forest and as we approached Drochaid Coire Roill, the skies started pouring on us. Never mind, the wet weather maybe encouraged this frog to venture out into the open.
ImageIMG_0009 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
It was soon clear it was just a shower. As we left the Drochaid and started up the east ridge of Beinn na h-Eaglaise, over lumpy heather and ice-scraped pavements, the clouds started to clear and we could see right into the heart of the Coulin Forest.
ImageIMG_0010 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
Some wet boilerplate slabs provided a nice foreground for a brooding view of Beinn Damh,
ImageIMG_0011 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
This side of Beinn na h-Eaglaise has lots of hidden lakes and ponds. Although marked on the map, each one seemed like a new discovery to us as we wended our way up the lumpy hillside.
ImageIMG_0014 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
Views of the Coulin Forest were getting even better. From left to right are the usual suspects: Beinn Liath Mhor, Sgorr Ruadh, Fuar Tholl and Maol Chean-Dearg.
ImageIMG_0012 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
Just had to get another photo of that view with a different foreground. Notice how quickly the rocks have dried.
ImageIMG_0013 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
Another nice pond.
ImageIMG_0015 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
And yet another - with a nice view back to Beinn Damh.
ImageIMG_0016 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
Over the top of another lump, we had a suddenly revealed, breathtakingly wide view over Glen Torridon, Liathach and Beinn Eighe.
ImageIMG_0019 (3) by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
Soon after we reached the summit cairn. I used the self-timer for this photo which seems to have made the colours go a bit wonky.
ImageIMG_0018 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
The view was not only fantastic, it was also very varied. Here's cloud massing over Beinn Eighe.
ImageIMG_0017 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
And Liathach looking stern and fierce.
ImageIMG_0019 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
However the sun was winning the battle against the clouds. Soon after, Glen Torridon was bathed in sunshine.
ImageIMG_0019 (2) by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
And the view out over Loch Torridon to the sea was stunning.
ImageIMG_0020 (2) by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
The ridge of Beinn na h-Eaglaise curves gently down from the summit over several minor lumps, back towards the top of the Coire Roill raview. It is as it it had been built for the express purpose of admiring Loch Torridon....
ImageIMG_0020 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
...Beinn Alligin - here seen from one of the many ponds on the descent...
ImageIMG_0023 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
...and the wonderful view out to the sea and Skye.
ImageIMG_0021 by Tim Pearce, on Flickr
This day, more than most, led me to ponder all things Munro-Bagging. I'm not a Bagger - not deliberately, anyway. I walk for the views, and I live a long way from the hills. So when I do get a chance to visit the Highlands, I'd rather spend my time on a hill like Beinn na h-Eaglaise. Not just for its views of the hills and the sea, but also for the detail of all its rocky lumps and bumps and its hidden lakes and streams.

For similar reasons, on my most recent walk in the hills, I chose to spend time just sitting and admiring Coire Kander, and the view from Cairn of Claise, rather than using my time to head over the plateau to visit the summit cairns of Tolmount and Tom Buidhe. I guess Tom Buidhe would be something to occupy a wet day - and in that context I can understand Munroing.

But on days of sunshine - or even better, on days of sunshine, showers and patterned clouds - I would choose Beinn na h-Eaglaise every time.
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User avatar
HalfManHalfTitanium
Mountain Walker
 
Posts: 1184
Munros:95   Corbetts:10
Grahams:2   Donalds:1
Hewitts:148
Wainwrights:103   
Joined: Mar 11, 2015

Re: Beinn Damh and Beinn na h-Eaglaise

Postby flowerofscotland » Tue Aug 28, 2018 2:50 pm

Hi Tim,
thanks for those brilliant pics and your nice reports! Make me look even more forward to Torridon ! The photo from the woodland path above Torridon Hotel could have been token in my home region Odenwald, looks very similar.
Btw, I like Famous Five, too. In Germany it's called "5 Freunde".
Cheers
Ruth
flowerofscotland
Munro compleatist
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Jul 18, 2018
Location: Germany

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