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Monsters on Drummond Hill

Monsters on Drummond Hill


Postby Jaywizz » Sun Jan 17, 2016 8:03 pm

Sub 2000' hills included on this walk: Drummond Hill

Date walked: 09/01/2016

Time taken: 3.3 hours

Distance: 9.5 km

Ascent: 370m

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WH map of track.jpg

A short way off the partly flooded road, we parked at the carpark with information boards
Following signs for Black Rock viewpoint, we followed the track with a pleasant gentle gradient up through forest, only to arrive at a discouraging barrier (we had been warned at the carpark).
WH notices.jpg
We 'authorised' each other and walked round the end of the barrier.

If the signs didn’t discourage walkers, then meeting this monster would.
WH Big digger.jpg
There would be no way round this 'monster' if it were in action!

On to the viewpoint – not much view due to mist and low cloud but we could make out the crannog across the loch.
We retraced our steps back to the main track and continued to the next track junction.
WH Ivan with orange digger.jpg
Another 'sleeping monster' - don't visit in working hours .................

WH logpile.jpg
Uphill from a point behind the logpile

Behind the large log piles, we left the track and headed up through the trees, steeply at first – not easy on the frozen moss - and then as the gradient eased, to pick up the line of the stone wall. I was horrified to find the ‘monsters’ had also been here – the soft moss-covered ground was trashed with deep muddy trenches, a nightmare to navigate.
WH state of track me.jpg
Slow going picking a way along great trenches, mud and part-frozen surfaces

Much of the ground was frozen – but, picking out a line along the central ridge between the deep tyre tracks, the ice crackled – always the anticipation that the ground would give way with a resulting slide into the mud. Eventually, I gave in, left the line of the track and walked through the deep moss and blueberry undergrowth. Walking up through the trees, I was aware of white ‘fluff ‘ on some low dead branches; it looked like very white sheeps wool, and I remember thinking at the time – no sheep in the forest, but unfortunately didn’t go close to inspect. A few days later, this ‘ice hair’ was featured on a BBC website – good to know what it is, and if I had known it was so rare, I definitely would have taken a photo!! (Google ‘ice hair’ for photos and explanation.)
Back to the walk. We followed the line of the wall, finally leaving the tracks behind, although trees marked with white or pink strips show the intention to fell further towards the summit.
WH the wall.jpg
How old is this wall and how many men built it and where did the stone come from?

A short detour enabled us to inspect the ruin just south of the wall, good solid walls and a fireplace – this ruin is not an ice-house, maybe originally a stalker’s bothy, a shepherd’s cottage?
WH ruin.jpg
Substantial walls, a fireplace - a bothy for shepherds or stalkers?

The actual summit is marked by a very small cairn perched on the wall – we tried to add to the cairn but the rocks nearby were frozen in situ.
WH ivan at summit.jpg
Yes, this really is the summit cairn, the few stones by my companion's elbow

To make a circular walk for the day, we continued west along the wall, dropping down to the col before picking up the track to take us back to the carpark, the last couple of hundred yards with the light dusting of a snow shower.
An enjoyable walk to stretch the legs after the festive season – and so pleased we visited on a day when no forestry operations were active!
Post-script : after reading some other postings this week, I nearly didn't post this - feeling a very lesser mortal in comparison to other WH contributors and their superb exploits (camping by Loch Ossian! I think I'm secretly jealous ......) but decided if this saves one reader from planning to walk on Drummond Hill only to find their way barred by working machinery, then it will have been worthwhile. If planning to go there, it may be worth phoning the Area Office at Dunkeld on 01350 727284 for latest update on the timber operations.
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Jaywizz
Munro compleatist
 
Posts: 230
Munros:237   Corbetts:32
Grahams:70   Donalds:89
Sub 2000:129   Hewitts:9
Wainwrights:4   Islands:25
Joined: Sep 16, 2012

Re: Monsters on Drummond Hill

Postby The Rodmiester » Wed Mar 09, 2016 10:55 am

Many thanks for posting this Jaywizz, I was thinking of maybe doing this en route to bigger and better hills this weekend, now I'm totally put off, ha ha. Think I will leave it just for the time being hat with forestry operations going on and having lost my GPS, think it might just be a little tricky finding the actual summit, lol.
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The Rodmiester
Walker
 
Posts: 3392
Munros:107   Corbetts:196
Grahams:45   Donalds:13
Sub 2000:76   Hewitts:3
Wainwrights:1   Islands:16
Joined: Aug 15, 2012
Location: Newbigging

Re: Monsters on Drummond Hill

Postby Jaywizz » Wed Mar 09, 2016 11:37 am

Sorry the report came over as negative - but if you are looking for an enjoyable walk away from it all, then this hill is not for you - at the moment! Maybe worth checking with Forestry Commission as to their schedule for completion. We're so fortunate in Scotland to have so many hills (of all shapes and sizes) to choose from.
User avatar
Jaywizz
Munro compleatist
 
Posts: 230
Munros:237   Corbetts:32
Grahams:70   Donalds:89
Sub 2000:129   Hewitts:9
Wainwrights:4   Islands:25
Joined: Sep 16, 2012

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