walkhighlands

Share your personal walking route experiences in Scotland, and comment on other peoples' reports.
Warning Please note that hillwalking when there is snow lying requires an ice-axe, crampons and the knowledge, experience and skill to use them correctly. Summer routes may not be viable or appropriate in winter. See winter information on our skills and safety pages for more information.

Forgiveness in Assynt

Forgiveness in Assynt


Postby weaselmaster » Mon Jun 20, 2016 4:48 pm

Grahams included on this walk: Beinn an Eoin, Ben Mor Coigach, Meall Dubh, Sgurr an Fhidhleir

Date walked: 19/06/2016

Time taken: 17.75 hours

Distance: 48.1 km

Ascent: 3227m

8 people think this report is great.
Register or Login
free to be able to rate and comment on reports (as well as access 1:25000 mapping).

[*disclaimer - I know that Ben More Coigach lies outwith Assynt in reality, but in my mind, Assynt starts with Coigach and reaches up to Kylescu, sometimes beyond. I also believe Foinaven and Arkle are included in it sometimes. It's my story, so my rules :lol: ]

Assynt - a place of magic, a place of many layers of memory. From teenage family holidays to ventures up with my own family, to the first walking holiday Allison and I took together back in 2013, Assynt has always resonated. A place like no other I've found, a land of majestic mountains, blue lochans, tranquillity for the soul. I've always loved it. Well - until our ill fated "summer" holiday last year when we spent most of a fortnight in Assynt and surrounds climbing Corbetts and got 1 good day out of 16. Minus 10 degrees on Breabag in June, I ask you :shock: So Assynt and me had a falling out and I started to see the beauty in other places: Knoydart; Skye; Torridon. But somewhere the feelings were still strong for Assynt. We've been reading "At the Corrie of the Green Lochan" again recently and that pulled on a few heartstrings. So a visit was probably a good idea to see what had become of that love.

The possibility of a 3 day weekend beckoned and the weather forecast for the Northwest was reasonable. Dammit - let's go :clap:

Driving up on Thursday afternoon to Ardmair Campsite stopping off at the M&S at Perth for some deli food, pitching the tent in that very stony ground by the seafront, being eaten by midges til we incarcerated ourselves in the tent inner. There was some excitement - Ben More Coigach was the chosen delicacy for the following day and we could look at it from the tent - dark buttressed wall rising due north of the campsite. I had somehow thought that Ardmair would be really close to the start of the route - silly me - I was vexed to discover that it would be 25 windy miles to Culnacraig, past Achiltibuie. Potrt a Bhaigh campsite would have been nearer and had the possible advantage of less midges. Oh well....


coigach.gpx Open full screen  NB: Walkhighlands is not responsible for the accuracy of gpx files in users posts



Friday was overcast and cloudy - I'd hoped for better. Oh well. We drove the twisty miles to Culnacraig, having risen early and after a couple of wrong turns arrived at the parking area just before the settlement. The ridge of Spiecien nan Garbh-coireachanloomed to our right. Walking down into the settlement we made the mistake of going through the gate. Don't. Pass to the left of the house by the bridge onto a sheep track which bypasses the houses and takes you a little way up the hill. Next, cross the grassy ground and get to the other side of the Allt nan Coisiche, aiming to ascend along the southern side of the gully. There is a path here which takes you onto flatter ground from 400m until the paths go every which way as soon as the rocky crest of Garbh Coireachan is reached. Easy to pick a way through then onto a fine narrow ridge. There are pinnacles along the way and you can make it as interesting as you wish on the good dry sandstone. Up ahead the mountain goes into a Y shape, one limb heading to the pyramidal top of Spiecein Coinnich, the other along to Sgurr an Fhidhleir. To our right lay the Summer Isles in a mirror calm sea.

Arriving at the parking spot - view to Summer isles
ImageDSC00947 by Al, on Flickr

An unexpected find in Culnacraig
ImageDSC00948 by Al, on Flickr

Setting off - Garbh Coireachan in backdrop
ImageDSC00949 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC00952 by Al, on Flickr

Silver light on the water
ImageDSC00953 by Al, on Flickr

Ridge, view to Ben More Coigach
ImageDSC00959 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC00960 by Al, on Flickr

After fun on the ridge we headed for the flat top of Ben More Coigach. In the distance I was disappointed only to see outlines of Suilven, Stac Pollaidh etc in the mist. We crossed back to our right to resume the ridge onto Spiecein Coinnich, meeting another walker in the process coming the opposite way. There's a fine lift up to the narrow top from a small bealach. From here we skirted round the eastern ridge, heading for Sgurr an Fhidhleir, meeting another couple of walkers. And we could see a group on top of Fhidhleir. Busy hill today. The prow of Fhidhleir soars impressively skywards, although the ascent is straightforward. We could see a climber about half way up. Grand views to Lochan Tuath, with the surrounding mountains becoming a little more visible in the mist. There are several rock projections on the way up which the more courageous might wish to clamber onto. The top is flanked by sheer drops on both sides :shock:

View to Fhidhleir from Coigach
ImageDSC00963 by Al, on Flickr

Looking back along the ridge
ImageDSC00965 by Al, on Flickr

Spiecein Coinnich
ImageDSC00966 by Al, on Flickr

Cul Mor
ImageDSC00969 by Al, on Flickr

Lochan Tuath
ImageDSC00970 by Al, on Flickr

Top, Coinnich
ImageDSC00972 by Al, on Flickr

Moth
ImageDSC00973 by Al, on Flickr

Onwards to Fhidhleir
ImageDSC00974 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC00979 by Al, on Flickr

Narrow summit of Fhidhleir
ImageDSC00984 by Al, on Flickr


From here there is a choice of routes - you can drop down into Coire Reidh or continue along the horseshoe to visit another 2 simms. You can guess which route we took. Heading down to the dip with the 648m northern top of Fhidhleir we passed a hill runner who was going at a fair pace. When we reached the cairned summit there were fine views to Pollaidh, Suilven, Cuinneag - MacCaig's "huddle of anvils" just peeping out and the ocean beyond. Well worth a visit.

On to the N Top
ImageDSC00986 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC00987 by Al, on Flickr

Looking back at Fhidhleir
ImageDSC00990 by Al, on Flickr

Rock promontory
ImageDSC00991 by Al, on Flickr

What do rocks find to talk about after so many aeons?
ImageDSC00993 by Al, on Flickr

Loch Tuath
ImageDSC00994 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC00996 by Al, on Flickr

Summit, Fhidleir North Top
ImageDSC00997 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC00998 by Al, on Flickr

Next was the rocky top of Beinn na Caorach. By this time there was even some blue sky. A drop northwest into the glen took us to the final top of Conmheall. We passed some more odd sandstone formations by the wee lochan, looking like eldrich figures watching the turf islands in the lochan race each other. From the top we could see the car park. We returned to the south to come off the last hill, there being significant crags and drops off to the west - would make a good ascent route though. Followed the Allt Tarsuinn back to the car, picking up a trail about halfway.

Ben Caorach
ImageDSC01003 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC01006 by Al, on Flickr

Conmheall
ImageDSC01008 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC01009 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC01010 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC01013 by Al, on Flickr

This was a cracking hill - in its own right as a circuit and with views to cherish. We both felt buoyed in spirits by the day. I have become more concerned about the aesthetics of hill routes as I've got longer in the tooth and like to try and get the best out of a hill. If we'd done this from Bhlugassary as most of the folk we met seemed to, we'd have had a shorted circuit, got both Grahams, but missed out on a fine ridge and some breathtaking (even in misty conditions) views. The whole horseshoe is definately worth it, and doesn't add much time on really. On the way back to the campsite I admit to stopping the car a few times to take pictures out of the window. :D

ImageDSC01016 by Al, on Flickr

Beinn an Eoin/ Coigach
ImageDSC01017 by Al, on Flickr

Sunset at the campsite
ImageDSC01021 by Al, on Flickr


eoin.gpx Open full screen  NB: Walkhighlands is not responsible for the accuracy of gpx files in users posts



Saturday was set aside for Beinn an Eoin, near neighbour of Coigach. The forecast had been so-so, but i could tell as a walked back from my 7.30 shower at the campsite that it was going to be a fine day. Blue skies with fluffy white clouds. Sunshine, in Assynt - yeah! We drove back along the Drumrunie road to the southern end of Loch Lurgainn. The SMC book suggests you can squeeze into a passing place by the water's edge, but I didn't think there was enough room and we drove 1km back to the parking area. Walking an extra kilometre in this landscape, on a sunny morning is no hardship. We arrived at the passing place and followed a foottrail down through gorse and bracken to a gate with an alarming sign. Passing through we continued along a good path that basically goes round the south of Feur Loch and follows the Allt Claonaidh. we continued on this a bit too long, as we were intending to climb up the Cioch Beinn an Eoin, but headed northwards, aiming for the 393 point along the ridge. A coiled adder hissed and uncoiled rapidly, darting away to a subterranean lair. A bit further on I spotted shed snakeskin. There were many sundews, pads held aloft to trap midges - good on you, wee carnivorous plants. As we walked, the prow of Fhidleir remained visible, poking out above the ridge of Eoin.

Coigach encircling Beinn an Eoin
ImageDSC01022 by Al, on Flickr

Nice morning for a walk - Loch Lurgainn
ImageDSC01023 by Al, on Flickr

Cioch of Beinn an Eoin (centre)
ImageDSC01024 by Al, on Flickr

Worrying notice :shock:
ImageDSC01025 by Al, on Flickr

Eoin, Tuath & Polly
ImageDSC01027 by Al, on Flickr

Lots of...
ImageDSC01029 by Al, on Flickr

...sundews
ImageDSC01030 by Al, on Flickr

Cioch
ImageDSC01033 by Al, on Flickr

Shed snakeskin
ImageDSC01034 by Al, on Flickr

We began climbing along the side of the ridge, aiming for the halfway point. We could see another walker coming up from our left. Once we reached the broad ridge crest the eye was smitten with Cul Mor & Beag, Stac Pollaidh and Suilven, suddenly appearing like tasty treats in a chocolate box. Walking up to the uninspiring summit of Eoin, the views made up for the hill being a nonentity otherwise. I was back in "Assynt is Heaven" mode - on days like this I don't think it can be beat. Looking down at Loch Lurgainn I remembered having a wash after climbing Stac Pollaidh when we wildcamped by the shores in a den of midges and ticks.

Up to the crest
ImageDSC01035 by Al, on Flickr

Coigach/Fhidhleir
ImageDSC01036 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC01037 by Al, on Flickr

Beinn an Eoin
ImageDSC01038 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC01040 by Al, on Flickr

Fhidleir
ImageDSC01044 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC01045 by Al, on Flickr

Sgurr Tuath in the foreground
ImageDSC01048 by Al, on Flickr

Pressing on over the next rise, Sgurr Deas we could see Sgurr Tuath ahead, across an unnamed lochan. Even though this failed to reach 600m, and hence was no simm, it should definately be climbed for reasons that will become obvious. A steepish grassy descent from Deas led us to the bealach and we had a look at the shoulder up Tuath - lots of playful sandstone crags. We had much fun scrambling about on them. On the hill top there's a cleft that suddenly opens up - looking gingerly down it did not appear to have a bottom, so if doing this hill when snow lying - be very aware, or you might take the quick route down. Continuing towards the summit you pass a cluster of outrageous stone pinnacles, which look directly across the loch at the master of outrageous pinnacles, Stac Pollaidh herself. We paused for lunch, which was longer than usual given the sights to behold, then got to the top.

ImageDSC01049 by Al, on Flickr

Happy weasel
ImageDSC01050 by Al, on Flickr

Tuath/Suilven
ImageDSC01052 by Al, on Flickr

Tuath - how could you not bother climbing this?
ImageDSC01054 by Al, on Flickr

Pollaidh
ImageDSC01058 by Al, on Flickr

Scrambly fun
ImageDSC01061 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC01062 by Al, on Flickr

Cleft - much scarier in reality
ImageDSC01064 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC01071 by Al, on Flickr

Pinnacles
ImageDSC01072 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC01074 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC01075 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC01076 by Al, on Flickr

We came off south into Coire Beinn an Eoin and followed the river along. I guess this is normally a boggy route, but in the present dry conditions it provided fine walking. We headed for the northern tip of Cioch Beinn an Eoin and around 120m followed a flatter countour back towards Feur Loch. We avoided having to cross the deer fence, joining up with the outward trail and returning to the car in an elated state.

Descent route
ImageDSC01078 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC01081 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC01083 by Al, on Flickr

Looks a bit like Stac Pollaidh!
ImageDSC01085 by Al, on Flickr


By this time it was gone three. The sky was blue and the air was beautifully warm. We bathed in scent from the gorse, which decorated the roadsides with its yellow jewels. What to do on a summer's afternoon in Assynt? You were right - we drove more windy miles to Lochinver to buy some cool drinks and crisps then the short distance to Achmelvich. My original plan had been to stay at Ardmair 2 nights and Achmelvich the third - I was kicking myself for not having done that now given the weather. We walked along to the furthest sandy beach, the one I used to frequent as a kid and had a lovely hour or two, paddling in the crystal clear water, sitting with the sun on skin. This is just so perfect, thought I, that a mere matter of 5 or 6 hours driving shouldn't keep me from coming up here whenever the urge takes me and the weather is like this. Assynt - you are fully forgiven 9at least until the next wet weekend :lol: )

ImageP1130210 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP1130211 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP1130212 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP1130215 by Al, on Flickr

Reluctantly we pulled ourselves away from the beach at 6pm and drove back to Ardmair, looking at all the mountains on the way down the road. A tasty tea, some sitting in the sun watching the sky change, clouds form and disperse over the bay. Hmm - life is good.

Ardmair
ImageDSC01087 by Al, on Flickr

Coigach
ImageDSC01088 by Al, on Flickr


breac.gpx Open full screen  NB: Walkhighlands is not responsible for the accuracy of gpx files in users posts



The forecast for Sunday was a cloudy day with rain later. I had toyed with various possibilities. We could head up Stac Pollaidh and get to the proper summit, which we didn't do last time, but I was still feeling too much of a scaredy-cat to do that. We could drive up towards Ben Stack and do that fine hill - but wrong direction for an already long drive home. I rummaged through the SMC book and came up with Beinn Breac (or Meall Dubh as WH would call it), an outlier of the Dearg range accessed from Inverlael. On the road home, nice gentle slopes - should be fine. Of course, adding in its two Tops (Simms, naturally) of Carn Mor and Meall Dubh brought the distance up to 22km or so, but a lot of that was on track. We gathered our stuff up at the campsite and headed off a short distance past Ullapool to the walkers car park at Inverlael. Quite busy already with folk presumably doing Dearg or Seana Bhraigh (or maybe even just having a walk up the glen - imagine!). We started out of the footpath at Balblair, enjoying the forest smells and sounds, the water flowing in the river bed, the birdsong. Continuing on to the merging of the tracks at Glensguaib, we chose the track that rises up Druim na Saobhaidhe that one could take for Seana Bhraigh. Memories came back of the time we'd walked in on this track in the late evening, camping high just shy of Seana Bhraigh at 10.30 at night in the mist and stillness- I think our first high wild camp - and headed off to summit Seana at 8am fortified by a single malt for breakfast. None of that today :roll:

Towards Beinn Dearg
ImageDSC01092 by Al, on Flickr

View back along the Glen, An Teallach hiding
ImageDSC01094 by Al, on Flickr

The excitement that is Carn Mor, Seanna Bhraigh in backdrop
ImageDSC01096 by Al, on Flickr

The going was easy and gentle and we climbed inexorably to 550m or so. The normally gushing river was muted and crossings couldn't have been easier. We reached the SW shoulder - if shoulder can be used for such a gentle incline - of Carn Mor and left Gleann a'Mhadaidh behind. I upset a hind that had been sheltering behind a peat hag and which scrambled to her feet, glared at me before running off. A while later we emerged at the grassy summit of Carn Mor, which provided good views to that elusive summit of Seana Bhraigh. On the other side, the hills of Assynt poked up into the low cloud.

Summit, Carn Mor
ImageDSC01099 by Al, on Flickr

We had lunch and set off NW to the unnamed (on the map) summit of Beinn Bhreac which is the Graham. A potentially boggy bealach between the hills, again made easy by the dry weather. not much to say about Beinn Bhreac, only that the Assynt hills seemed a little nearer. On across Coire Siolar, the only sound the piping of plover - sometimes singly, sometimes in stereo. The top of meall Dubh was attained and we walked southwest off the hill to meet thetrack running alongside the Allt Badan Seasgach. A multiplicity of tracks was visible in the floor of the glen below. The track led us to the forestry plantation and down to rejoin the lower track by way of an unmarked path that threads through the young trees. Back at the car in 6 hours and a little bit for the drive home. About 10 minutes after we set off the rain started and followed us down the road - a dreich ending to a lovely weekend.

Beinn Bhreac
ImageDSC01101 by Al, on Flickr

Plover
ImageDSC01102 by Al, on Flickr

Summit Bhreac, Assynt Hills
ImageDSC01104 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP1130221 by Al, on Flickr

Summit Meall Dubh
ImageDSC01107 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP1130225 by Al, on Flickr

ImageDSC01109 by Al, on Flickr
User avatar
weaselmaster
Hill Bagger
 
Posts: 1888
Munros:214   Corbetts:44
Grahams:76   Donalds:89
Sub 2000:331   Hewitts:31
Wainwrights:15   Islands:28
Joined: Aug 22, 2012
Location: Greenock

Re: Forgiveness in Assynt

Postby jamesb63 » Mon Jun 20, 2016 5:59 pm

Brilliant report :clap: :clap: I haven't been in Assynt since I was a child
and its just as I remember stunning ,some beautiful photos aswell :D
User avatar
jamesb63
Munro compleatist
 
Posts: 397
Munros:218   Corbetts:2
Sub 2000:2   
Joined: Apr 14, 2015
Location: Alexandria

Re: Forgiveness in Assynt

Postby dooterbang » Mon Jun 20, 2016 6:01 pm

That was bloody awesome!!!

Glad you never fell out with Assynt for good :wink:

This is also my favourite area, just love it. Need to try that Beinn an Eoin out. looks spectacular!

I camped at the N top of the ridge last year, and also 3 weeks ago...just about to post my delayed report on it :)

Thanks for posting.
User avatar
dooterbang
Munro compleatist
 
Posts: 1828
Munros:257   Corbetts:58
Grahams:18   Donalds:10
Sub 2000:10   Hewitts:18
Wainwrights:21   Islands:19
Joined: Oct 27, 2009
Location: Isle of Skye from Feb 2019 (Originally Glasgow)

Re: Forgiveness in Assynt

Postby Cairngorm creeper » Mon Jun 20, 2016 6:19 pm

It all looks amazing and enjoyed reading your report. Your stirred my interest in Beinn an Eoin, not really heard about it before.
User avatar
Cairngorm creeper
Scrambler
 
Posts: 690
Munros:140   Corbetts:21
Grahams:6   Donalds:1
Sub 2000:1   Hewitts:15
Wainwrights:9   
Joined: Jun 4, 2013
Location: Grantown-on-spey

Re: Forgiveness in Assynt

Postby weaselmaster » Mon Jun 20, 2016 7:01 pm

dooterbang wrote:That was bloody awesome!!!

Glad you never fell out with Assynt for good :wink:

This is also my favourite area, just love it. Need to try that Beinn an Eoin out. looks spectacular!

I camped at the N top of the ridge last year, and also 3 weeks ago...just about to post my delayed report on it :)

Thanks for posting.

Cheers, Doots.
Your original post was the inspiration for going up Coigach this weekend - I remember looking at your photos and being dazzled. We didn't have as good a day weatherwise, nor the overnight experience but it was still a fine hill :D
User avatar
weaselmaster
Hill Bagger
 
Posts: 1888
Munros:214   Corbetts:44
Grahams:76   Donalds:89
Sub 2000:331   Hewitts:31
Wainwrights:15   Islands:28
Joined: Aug 22, 2012
Location: Greenock

Re: Forgiveness in Assynt

Postby Sick Kid » Mon Jun 20, 2016 8:18 pm

Such a fab weekend! Still smiling :D :D :D :D :D
User avatar
Sick Kid
Walker
 
Posts: 506
Munros:282   Corbetts:222
Grahams:219   Donalds:89
Sub 2000:298   Hewitts:26
Wainwrights:13   
Joined: Dec 2, 2013
Location: Sunny Gourock by the sea!

Re: Forgiveness in Assynt

Postby Scotjamie » Tue Jun 21, 2016 10:06 am

Brilliant Al (and Ali). Inspiring report....the Assynt OS maps are now spread out on the floor.
User avatar
Scotjamie
Mountaineer
 
Posts: 1168
Munros:148   
Joined: Jul 27, 2009
Location: north berwick

Re: Forgiveness in Assynt

Postby McMole » Fri Aug 05, 2016 6:10 pm

Great report Al, and only now as I was writing my own did I realise it was you I followed up Beinn an Eoin. I'll definitely be back there to experience the pinnacles and The Gap and I have now invested in a new Loch Assynt Landranger - I managed to lose the old one. About time too some would say! Cost a bit more than the £1.15 of the First Series. :(
McMole
Walker
 
Posts: 180
Munros:141   Corbetts:50
Grahams:40   Donalds:89
Sub 2000:143   Hewitts:25
Wainwrights:4   
Joined: Mar 25, 2016

Re: Forgiveness in Assynt

Postby Alteknacker » Fri Aug 05, 2016 10:36 pm

Brilliant! Somehow I managed to miss this when it was first published - but a great joy to read now; and such brilliant pics, especially on the 2nd day - 37, 40, 48, 52, 54 ..... I stopped counting - too many.

This is my number one target as soon as I've retired ( less that 2 year now :-) ) when I've got a bit more time to manage the 11 hours plus journey; and can afford to take poor weather with a stoical cast of mind!!
User avatar
Alteknacker
Scrambler
 
Posts: 2971
Munros:169   Corbetts:29
Hewitts:237
Wainwrights:100   
Joined: May 25, 2013
Location: Effete South (of WIgan, anyway)

Re: Forgiveness in Assynt

Postby weaselmaster » Fri Aug 05, 2016 11:24 pm

Alteknacker wrote:Brilliant! Somehow I managed to miss this when it was first published - but a great joy to read now; and such brilliant pics, especially on the 2nd day - 37, 40, 48, 52, 54 ..... I stopped counting - too many.

This is my number one target as soon as I've retired ( less that 2 year now :-) ) when I've got a bit more time to manage the 11 hours plus journey; and can afford to take poor weather with a stoical cast of mind!!


Oh save these lot for a good weather moment. When you've retired that will be easier. Less than 6 months til i retire :-P :-P
User avatar
weaselmaster
Hill Bagger
 
Posts: 1888
Munros:214   Corbetts:44
Grahams:76   Donalds:89
Sub 2000:331   Hewitts:31
Wainwrights:15   Islands:28
Joined: Aug 22, 2012
Location: Greenock

Re: Forgiveness in Assynt

Postby Chris Mac » Sat Aug 06, 2016 1:31 am

Wow... just... wow! You see a lot of reports on here with people telling of their love for Assynt and it always looks good, but only after seeing these photos do I now understand why everyone makes such a fuss about it! An amazing landscape, I think having so much distance between hills gives you more space to appreciate them despite the "lowly" Graham tag, compared to the bunched up highland hills elsewhere. No matter the height, when you see a peak like Sgurr an Fhidhleir you can't help but admire the beauty of it. Height means nothing, it's character that counts and Assynt just looks like another planet compared to what you are used to seeing in the landscape, especially with the shots you took, outstanding! :shock: :D :clap:
User avatar
Chris Mac
 
Posts: 821
Munros:40   Corbetts:22
Grahams:10   Donalds:10
Sub 2000:49   Hewitts:3
Wainwrights:10   
Joined: Sep 11, 2014

Re: Forgiveness in Assynt

Postby Collaciotach » Sat Aug 06, 2016 2:03 pm

Good stuff :clap: :clap: :clap:
User avatar
Collaciotach
Mountain Walker
 
Posts: 1788
Munros:282   Corbetts:143
Grahams:31   Donalds:3
Sub 2000:21   
Islands:28
Joined: Aug 8, 2011
Location: Gaidhealtachd an Iar

8 people think this report is great.
Register or Login
free to be able to rate and comment on reports (as well as access 1:25000 mapping).



Walkhighlands community forum is advert free

We need help to keep the site online.
Can you help support Walkhighlands and the online community by setting up a monthly donation by direct debit?



Return to Walk reports - Scotland

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 70 guests