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Pike of Terror

Pike of Terror


Postby HalfManHalfTitanium » Fri Jun 24, 2016 2:55 pm

Wainwrights included on this walk: Great Gable, High Stile, Red Pike (Buttermere)

Hewitts included on this walk: Great Gable, High Stile, Red Pike (Buttermere)

Date walked: 28/06/2008

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This report covers a weekend in Buttermere, climbing Great Gable on one day, and Red Pike and High Stile on another.


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Buttermere

ImageIMG_8215 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

The reason for the title of this report will become clear at the end...

The party was me and my two children and my friend Stuart and his three. Our first objective was Great Gable - we set off from Honister.

ImageIMG_7619 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

On up through the old tramway cutting -

ImageIMG_7624 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Drum House was the natural first stopping point. The skyline is Pillar, Haystacks, High Crag and High Stile.

ImageIMG_7632 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

The kids had a keen appreciation of the industrial archaeology.

ImageIMG_7640 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

This is an ideal hillwalk to do with children: a start at nearly 1200 feet means less uphill slog, and the path is easy, and easy to follow.

ImageIMG_7645 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Views to the west widened as we climbed. Ennerdale Water on the left: Crummock Water and Buttermere on the right.

ImageIMG_7652 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

We were soon heading up towards Green Gable, overtopped by the towering dome of Great Gable.

ImageIMG_7661 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Looking across Windy Gap towards Great Gable.

ImageIMG_7670 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

The summit!

ImageIMG_7692 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Enjoying a sit down and a chat.

ImageIMG_7689 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Time for some lunch.

ImageIMG_7673 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Hiding amongst the summit crags.

ImageIMG_7706 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

The topmost rock of Great Gable. Skyline is Scoat Fell, Steeple, Black Crag, Pillar, Herdus and either Starling Dodd or Red Pike - I suspect the latter, hiding Starling Dodd behind it.

ImageIMG_7719 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

We descended back to Windy Gap, and then down towards Ennerdale with the aim of picking up Moses' Trod. From this angle it can be seen that Green Gable has some substantial crags of its own.

ImageIMG_7749 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Looking down into Ennerdale.

ImageIMG_7752 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Three amigos and Gable Crag.

ImageIMG_7757 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Nearing Moses' Trod.

ImageIMG_7759 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

On the way back, another R&R stop.

ImageIMG_7767 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

The last lap...

ImageIMG_7775 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Back at Honister Quarry.

ImageIMG_7782 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Buttermere Youth Hostel was excellent. We especially enjoyed the lake...

ImageIMG_8139 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

...the ice-cream

ImageIMG_8210 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

...relaxing (near Gatescarth Farm)

ImageIMG_8168 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

The barn roof paralleled the outline of Fleetwith Pike above.

ImageIMG_8152 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Some of us enjoyed swimming too -

ImageIMG_8234 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

The next day we were greeted by bright sunshine: the haziness of the previous day had gone. This is the view from our window looking across to the High Stile range - our target for the day.

ImageIMG_8075 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

The few clouds dispersed...

ImageIMG_8088 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Leaving the hostel...

ImageIMG_7882 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Haystacks, High Crag and the northern flank of High Stile.

ImageIMG_7900 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

The path to Red Pike leads along the western shore of Buttermere.

ImageIMG_7909 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

ImageIMG_7935 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Any opportunity to take unnecessary risks was fully exploited.

ImageIMG_7924 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

I must admit, the grown-ups too were a bit naughty here. There were signs discouraging visitors from climbing up alongside the Sour Milk Gill falls, recommending the well-worn tourist path instead.

We ignored the signs.

ImageIMG_7948 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

We paid for our misdeeds in the form of a jungly scramble through trees, rocks, thick bracken and thicker heather.

ImageIMG_7962 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

However, we were rewarded by some rather wonderful views, both close up and far away.

ImageIMG_7963 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

ImageIMG_7960 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

ImageIMG_7956 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

ImageIMG_7952 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

ImageIMG_7964 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Sail, Scar Crags and Ard Crags peeping out in the distance.

ImageIMG_7965 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

The problem for the younger kids was that the vegetation was often well above their heads. It was a relief to emerge onto higher slopes where the heather was a bit less luxuriant. Which also gave us a nice view of Mellbreak and Crummock Water.

ImageIMG_7970 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Soon after, we arrived at Bleaberry Tarn where the kids enjoyed blocking the stream with stones and then re-enacting the Dam Busters raid.

ImageIMG_7972 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

The path from the tarn up to Red Pike is an eroded scar, helpfully stepped in some places but not all.

ImageIMG_7988 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Run to the summit!

ImageIMG_7991 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

At the top cairn.

ImageIMG_7998 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Another summit shot: a slightly wonky skyline of Robinson, Hindscarth, Dale Head and Fleetwith Pike topped by the Dodds-Helvellyn-Fairfield range.

ImageIMG_8001 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Setting off along the ridge to High Stile. The backdrop is Broad Crag, Scafell Pike, Scafell and Pillar.

ImageIMG_8008 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

On the ridge with Bleaberry Combe below.

ImageIMG_8018 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

On the way up to High Stile summit.

ImageIMG_8016 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Optional scrambling.

ImageIMG_8026 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Crummock Water and Bleaberry Combe from thethe top of High Stile.

ImageIMG_8029 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Pillar

ImageIMG_8034 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Setting off for High Crag - skyline is Green and Great Gable, Great End, Ill and Broad Crag, Scafell Pike and Scafell, with Kirkfell and the eastern ridge of Pillar below.however after a few minutes we decided to retrace our steps to Red Pike, rather than end up at the wrong end of Buttermere and having to walk back along the shore.

ImageIMG_8038 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Descending the eroded path. "Red Pike" is well named.

ImageIMG_8049 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

First port of call - the Fish Inn.

ImageIMG_7896 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

While the Dads enjoyed some much-needed refreshment, my daughter drew a postcard of the three High Stile peaks, to inform my wife what we'd done today.

ImageIMG_8067 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

However, knowing that the first hill was called Red Pike, she was alarmed to spot a real Pike (stuffed) in the glass case above us. We'd been swimming in the lake with those!

ImageIMG_8054 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr

Never mind, half an hour later she was having another go.

ImageIMG_8233 by Half Man Half Titanium, on Flickr
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HalfManHalfTitanium
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Re: Pike of Terror

Postby ChrisW » Fri Jun 24, 2016 5:02 pm

It does my heart good to see so many kids running and playing out in the hills, what a great couple of days with some fantastic images to aid the memories later in life. The shot of your daughter laid on top of the fence as if totally exhausted is brilliant. I have to say that's 2 good hiking days for the kids.

I remember our local boozer had a giant pike in a glass case very similar to that and I had the same thoughts about swimming with em :lol:

I didn't realise Red Pike was so steep until I saw your daughters picture of it...she obviously thought so :lol: :lol:

What a lovely couple of days and the weather played along too, what more could you ask :clap: :clap:
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Re: Pike of Terror

Postby HalfManHalfTitanium » Sat Jun 25, 2016 8:19 am

Cheers Chris! Thanks very much - yes it was a great weekend and one that my kids remember with fond memories.

My daughter's keenness for swimming remains, now she is in her teens she is learning scuba diving.

Loved your Jumpingpound Mountain report, the wild flowers in particular looked amazing!

Tim
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Re: Pike of Terror

Postby Alteknacker » Mon Jun 27, 2016 12:16 pm

Absolutely brilliant! Nothing better than kids enjoying themselves! :D :D :clap: :clap:
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Re: Pike of Terror

Postby HalfManHalfTitanium » Mon Jun 27, 2016 7:10 pm

Alteknacker wrote:Absolutely brilliant! Nothing better than kids enjoying themselves! :D :D :clap: :clap:


Cheers Alteknacker - yes it was a great weekend for the kids. My daughter still worries about pike when scuba diving though...

Tim
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Re: Pike of Terror

Postby pamfox » Thu Jun 30, 2016 8:37 pm

Brilliant photos, some of them quite comical. What a great bunch of kids you've got between you. They won't forget days like that. I remember walking up towards Wansfell Pike from Ambleside when my son was 7. He kept running up and down the hill to see why I was taking so long. He loved being outdoors at that age. Lovely report :)
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Re: Pike of Terror

Postby MiniRambo » Thu Jun 30, 2016 10:10 pm

Cracking report and photos which convey a sense of enjoyment for all ages concerned. :clap: :clap:
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Re: Pike of Terror

Postby HalfManHalfTitanium » Fri Jul 01, 2016 8:36 am

pamfox wrote:Brilliant photos, some of them quite comical. What a great bunch of kids you've got between you. They won't forget days like that. I remember walking up towards Wansfell Pike from Ambleside when my son was 7. He kept running up and down the hill to see why I was taking so long. He loved being outdoors at that age. Lovely report :)


Thanks Pamfox! - much appreciated! Yes it creates a lot of good memories for the children I think - I bet your son remembers Wansfell Pike fondly!

Tim
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Re: Pike of Terror

Postby HalfManHalfTitanium » Sat Jul 02, 2016 6:35 am

MiniRambo wrote:Cracking report and photos which convey a sense of enjoyment for all ages concerned. :clap: :clap:


Thanks MiniRambo - much appreciated!

Very much enjoyed your Great Borne / Starling Dodd report too - I will have to get out to those western fells sometime!

Tim
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