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An Teallach at Last

An Teallach at Last


Postby johnkaysleftleg » Fri Jun 30, 2017 2:54 pm

Munros included on this walk: Bidein a'Ghlas Thuill (An Teallach)

Date walked: 31/05/2017

Distance: 13 km

Ascent: 1096m

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When you start hill walking there are a few iconic images you see regularly that provide some goals to strive for. Few of those are more striking than the view from the summit of An Teallach looking along it's serrated ridges. It's one of those scenes that as a lowlander you can't quite believe exists in Britain, surely this is a view from the Alps or the Rockies you think? but no it's in Britain and not actually that hard to get to :shock:

The last time we spent some time in the North West Highlands, about eight years ago, we had fully intended to attempt Bidein a'Ghlas Thuill but due to the weather and other things it just didn't happen. Upon our long awaited return it was top of the list. What wasn't on the list was a full traverse due to our own lack of hill fitness and the presence of of our faithful canine companion Hughie the Westie. Still a walk to witness one of the most iconic views in Britain on a beautiful summers day would do for us. :)

The parking was quite busy considering a relatively early start, no doubt people allowing plenty time for a long day, but we managed to dump the car and headed off up the Walkhighlands recommended older but slightly longer route to the summit.

ImageLooking across Strath Beag by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageViews starting to open up by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageThe Head of Little Loch Broom by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageViews to Beinn Dearg and the Fannichs by Anthony Young, on Flickr

The initial stages of the path are quite eroded and rough but by the time the top of Glas Mheall Mor loomed into view the going was good and a very pleasant walk took in ever improving views out across the wondrous West Highland landscape.

ImageGlas Mheall Mor by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageHughie by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageEasy going over the slabs by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageLittle Loch Broom by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageLooking towards the Fannichs by Anthony Young, on Flickr

Slowly but surely height is gained and exciting pointy things are spied, first our target for the day Bidein a'Ghlas Thuill and then the stunning Sgurr Fiona. The latter of these looks more and more impressive the closer you get as it soon achieves Cuillin equaling magnificence especially with Lord Berkeley's seat behind.

We had lunch taking in this and Coire Mor an Teallaich, one of several stunning coires on An Teallach before the final assault on the top.

ImageBidein a'Ghlas Thuil comes into view by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageLooking down Coir'a' Mhuilin by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageTowards Assynt by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageLooking over Beinn nam ban to a distant Ben Kilbreck by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageLooking back down to the road by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageSgurr Fiona joins the party by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageMagnificent views behind us by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageSgurr Fiona, Wow! by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageCoire Mor an Teallaich panorama by Anthony Young, on Flickr (click for bigger version)

ImageLooking out over Lochan Ruadh by Anthony Young, on Flickr

The final pull wasn't too bad at all with the going surprisingly solid over the scree and boulders. I am glad we followed the ridge rather than the diagonal sloping path however as we were rewarded with views down stunning Glas Tholl that for me rivaled the sight down to Toll an Lochain.

ImageGlas Mheall Mor from the ridge up Bidein a'ghlas Thuill by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageThe magnificent Coire of Glas Tholl by Anthony Young, on Flickr (click for bigger version)

ImageLooking towards Sail Mhor by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageFinal pull up to the summit by Anthony Young, on Flickr

And so the summit was attained with the views being everything that we'd hoped for on a simply stunning afternoon. We finished off our remaining rations taking it all in and despite my hints along the lines of "Sgurr Fiona looks amazing, should we not just do it now we're here?" we went no further.

ImageGrace with Tad, our Munro mascot by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageThe ultimate photo opp? by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageLooking over to the Quartzite topped Glas Mheall Liath by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageKing of Westies by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageAimless Desire by Anthony Young, on Flickr (click for bigger version)

ImageLunch spot by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageFamily summit shot by Anthony Young, on Flickr

For our return we opted for the newer route as the ground was dry and it also provided variation. It was nicely graded and never too steep but it's potential for bogginess was all too apparent at times.

ImageHughie leads the way by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageThe Beinn Dearg Munros by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageTaking a breather by Anthony Young, on Flickr

Image
Glas Mheall Mor from the descent by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageAnother look towards Beinn Dearg and friends by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageLast look back by Anthony Young, on Flickr

We returned to the car to be politely confronted by a chap who informed us that we had parked on crown property when we really shouldn't have done. I did point out the complete lack of signage, a point which he conceded but I agreed not to park here again (I feel he may have forgotten me in another eight years :lol: )
Turns out however as my better half works for the Civil service and therefore the crown we were perfectly entitled to park there after all. An interesting point for all you civil servants out there.


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Last edited by johnkaysleftleg on Sun Jul 02, 2017 9:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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johnkaysleftleg
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Re: An Teallach at Last

Postby spiderwebb » Fri Jun 30, 2017 4:26 pm

Stunning photos there JK, what a gorgeous day you had. Such were the magnificence of those views I missed the summit of Fiona having come round the bypass to the pinnacles, but it left an excuse for the return, not that I would have needed one :D But it certainly is a true mountain, one to be savoured for a special occasion :wink:
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Re: An Teallach at Last

Postby Alteknacker » Fri Jun 30, 2017 11:07 pm

What a sensational portfolio of pics of this iconic mountain :clap: :clap: :clap: (which I haven't yet ascended :( ) - though on past form I'm really not surprised! Invidious to single out any in particular really, but "Aimless Desire" is just fabulous: it makes me want to pack up immediately and jump into the car.....

I hope I have similarly brilliant weather when I eventually get around to doing An Teallach.
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Re: An Teallach at Last

Postby dav2930 » Fri Jun 30, 2017 11:54 pm

What a stunning mountain! As you say, looks more like the Rockies than little old Britain. Looked a wonderful and exciting day out for the family JK, you were so lucky to get such good weather! I was less lucky when I did the traverse all of 17 years ago; the clag was down for most of it. Must go back on a day like you had. Excellent report and photos as ever. :clap:
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Re: An Teallach at Last

Postby simon-b » Fri Jun 30, 2017 11:58 pm

That's the sort of day you want for An Teallach. Nice to see those pictures of Sgurr Fiona, which was my 100th Munro - in mist when I was there, despite the good forecast I'd set off with. Your photos show just how spiky the Corrag Buidhe ridge is, Anthony. Alteknacker should enjoy going along the crest of that one.
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Re: An Teallach at Last

Postby Cairngorm creeper » Sat Jul 01, 2017 11:40 pm

Absolutely stunning photos and I love King of the Westies :D . I hope to see those iconic views soon :D
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Re: An Teallach at Last

Postby Huff_n_Puff » Sun Jul 02, 2017 3:18 pm

Beautiful photos and lovely report - An Teallach is just superb - and you have an excuse for a second trip :lol: :lol: I too am impressed by the King of the Westies :clap: :clap: (and his humans of course :lol: )
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Re: An Teallach at Last

Postby johnkaysleftleg » Mon Jul 03, 2017 10:36 am

spiderwebb wrote:Stunning photos there JK, what a gorgeous day you had. Such were the magnificence of those views I missed the summit of Fiona having come round the bypass to the pinnacles, but it left an excuse for the return, not that I would have needed one :D But it certainly is a true mountain, one to be savoured for a special occasion :wink:


Thank you SW, I certainly hope I get to return to An Teallach again one day and it takes me less that eight years to get back up that way.

Alteknacker wrote:What a sensational portfolio of pics of this iconic mountain :clap: :clap: :clap: (which I haven't yet ascended :( ) - though on past form I'm really not surprised! Invidious to single out any in particular really, but "Aimless Desire" is just fabulous: it makes me want to pack up immediately and jump into the car.....

I hope I have similarly brilliant weather when I eventually get around to doing An Teallach.


Thanks for your kind words. I'm quite surprised you haven't done An Teallach yet Alte, you've certainly got a huge treat one you make it up there.

dav2930 wrote:What a stunning mountain! As you say, looks more like the Rockies than little old Britain. Looked a wonderful and exciting day out for the family JK, you were so lucky to get such good weather! I was less lucky when I did the traverse all of 17 years ago; the clag was down for most of it. Must go back on a day like you had. Excellent report and photos as ever. :clap:


Cheers Dav it certainly is a beauty of a mountain, still must have been great fun even in the clag, I wouldn't mind a closer look at that ridge one day.

simon-b wrote:That's the sort of day you want for An Teallach. Nice to see those pictures of Sgurr Fiona, which was my 100th Munro - in mist when I was there, despite the good forecast I'd set off with. Your photos show just how spiky the Corrag Buidhe ridge is, Anthony. Alteknacker should enjoy going along the crest of that one.


Thanks Simon, we couldn't have asked for better it wasn't even that hot even with the sunshine. I'm sure you'll have another visit to take in the views at some point.

Huff_n_Puff wrote:Beautiful photos and lovely report - An Teallach is just superb - and you have an excuse for a second trip :lol: :lol: I too am impressed by the King of the Westies :clap: :clap: (and his humans of course :lol: )


Huff_n_Puff wrote:Beautiful photos and lovely report - An Teallach is just superb - and you have an excuse for a second trip :lol: :lol: I too am impressed by the King of the Westies :clap: :clap: (and his humans of course :lol: )


Thank you both you are too kind. I'll pass on your regards to the King of Westies himself :D
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Re: An Teallach at Last

Postby Mal Grey » Mon Jul 03, 2017 11:25 am

Good stuff. Your first paragraph caught my feelings about this magnificent mountain perfectly. I distinctly remember opening Irvine Butterfield's wonderful "The High Mountains of Britain and Ireland" to a double page spread of the view of the Corrag Bhuidhe and Sgurr Fiona from the summit. As you say, it looked like something from a different country, one of the greater ranges perhaps. Coupled with a description in one of Wilson's books of the "discovery" of this ridge (by climbers rather than locals!) only a hundred years or so before, and as a teenager I was completely inspired. It took me a few years to get there, but when I did, I was not disappointed.

I saw this report whilst away camping this weekend, but deliberately saved opening it until I got home, as I knew the phone wouldn't give justice to your excellent images. I was not disappointed.
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Re: An Teallach at Last

Postby johnkaysleftleg » Tue Jul 04, 2017 12:47 pm

Mal Grey wrote:Good stuff. Your first paragraph caught my feelings about this magnificent mountain perfectly. I distinctly remember opening Irvine Butterfield's wonderful "The High Mountains of Britain and Ireland" to a double page spread of the view of the Corrag Bhuidhe and Sgurr Fiona from the summit. As you say, it looked like something from a different country, one of the greater ranges perhaps. Coupled with a description in one of Wilson's books of the "discovery" of this ridge (by climbers rather than locals!) only a hundred years or so before, and as a teenager I was completely inspired. It took me a few years to get there, but when I did, I was not disappointed.

I saw this report whilst away camping this weekend, but deliberately saved opening it until I got home, as I knew the phone wouldn't give justice to your excellent images. I was not disappointed.


Thank you Mal, It wasn't until I was mid 30's before I even considered taking to the hills and it was pictures of An Teallach and the Cuillin that inspired me most. I'd have never believed I'd ever see sights like this 15 years ago.
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Location: County Durham

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