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Burnmouth to Moaness via Craig Gate and Lyrie Geo.

Burnmouth to Moaness via Craig Gate and Lyrie Geo.


Postby litljortindan » Fri Jul 07, 2017 6:31 pm

Date walked: 04/07/2017

Time taken: 9 hours

Distance: 21 km

Ascent: 350m

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Hurt my left knee playing football last month and still a bit stiff and sore so was looking for an easyish walk. Hoy appealed because of its low pollen count, supposedly low midge count (ho ho) and an extant plan to walk along the cliff tops south of Rackwick Bay.
I took the precaution of booking tickets in advance just in case but needn't have worried -plenty of room on the giant Scrabster ferry. I had parked here before but had to be reminded of the slightly bizarre ten pounds for any part of a week charge and couldn't quite persuade myself to believe the locals who assured me that on street parking restrictions are never enforced so into the tenner car park it was.
I had also debated over whether to hire a bicycle or order a taxi to help reduce the knee burden and phoned Clark's taxis en route. Seven pounds sounded reasonable for a trip from Moaness to Rackwick Bay so we agreed to meet at 4.30pm. Also cycling even for only five miles might have been a bit much for me on a warm afternoon and it costs at least ten pounds per day to hire a bike. Maybe next time.
Fantastic views of the Hoy cliffs on the way round to Stromness and a pleasant enough hour spent wandering around the town with free art exhibitions to view.
Got to Hoy and found that I was to join a group going over to Rackwick where I was only charged three pounds, presumably because I was now part of a group. I also noted from the taxi driver that the Burnmouth bothy was now open; a possible option for the night, the alternative plan being to kip in a survival bag on a carry mat near the beach.
The burn crossing that had put me off in March was now easily negotiated via stepping stones and the rest of the way along the dunes was easy going though my knee was reminding me a little bit that it wasn't quite right. Got a bit rougher after cutting inland but then got easier but steep once onto the second and second steepest path up. That path petered out at the flatter area above and I was then able to double back across the grassy hillside to reach Craig Gate. By this point my knee seemed to have settled and didn't bother me very much at all until later the next day.
Easy walking thereafter but a lot slower than anticipated as it was both very interesting and quite warm. My original plan of a much longer walk out to a waterfall beyond the Sneuk was soon ditched in favour of a slower and more detailed examination of a couple of the geos along the way. Kept going until about seven thirty then doubled back to find a place to watch the sun going down. That change of plan was greatly aided by my water filter that enabled me to top up from a dribble of water in the moss without necessitating a lengthy continuation south or a premature retreat north.
On the way back to the bothy I was amazed to see dozens if not hundreds of what looked like bath white butterflies (identified afterwards by my wife) in the heather and grass behind the dunes.
Got five hours of light sleep then set off along the road back to Moaness. Had though about taking the Berriedale path but thought the road might just be a bit better for the knee. In fact no knee problems really until nearing the ferry when I got a few twinges.

ImageDSC00543c by John Little, on Flickr
The Berry. I visited these wonderfully colourful cliffs in March.

ImageDSC00550c by John Little, on Flickr
Rora Head, Candle of the Sneuk and The Berry.

ImageDSC00581c by John Little, on Flickr
The Old Man of Hoy.

ImageDSC00587c by John Little, on Flickr
Caithness hills in the background.

ImageDSC00595c by John Little, on Flickr
Rounding the magnificent St. John's Head.

ImageDSC00612c by John Little, on Flickr
Graemsay lighthouse.

ImageDSC00616c by John Little, on Flickr
The cliff tops that I am headed for.

ImageDSC00618c by John Little, on Flickr
The Caithness hills again.

ImageDSC00636c by John Little, on Flickr
Rora Head in the distance with Black Nev in front and the path to the Old Man atop.

ImageDSC00637c by John Little, on Flickr
No problem crossing the burn today and not bad going up the hillside once I had cut onto the second and second steepest path up.

ImageDSC00643c by John Little, on Flickr
Loyal and Hope.

ImageDSC00647c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00654c by John Little, on Flickr
Reminiscent of the bay below Menawn Heights.

ImageDSC00655c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00657c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00661c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00661c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00663c by John Little, on Flickr
At the top of Craig Gate.

ImageDSC00676c by John Little, on Flickr
Not quite as I imagined it would be but still good.

ImageDSC00669c by John Little, on Flickr
Looking a bit like the Canary Islands here. Think this might be Red Geo.

ImageDSC00683c by John Little, on Flickr
Slowly working my way along the many mini geos.

ImageDSC00698c by John Little, on Flickr
Not exactly sure where I am here but it might be White Chest.

ImageDSC00703c by John Little, on Flickr
Morven prominent again.

ImageDSC00704c by John Little, on Flickr
Lots of bog cotton.

ImageDSC00711c by John Little, on Flickr
Zooming back to Rackwick Bay -the camera, not me!

ImageDSC00712c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00719c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00727c by John Little, on Flickr
Always like to be beside the seaside.

ImageDSC00735c by John Little, on Flickr
Possibly Geo of the Lame.

ImageDSC00736c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00740c by John Little, on Flickr
The Hamnavoe.

ImageDSC00744c by John Little, on Flickr
One more of Morven and co.

ImageDSC00763c by John Little, on Flickr
Santoo Head from Lyrie Geo?

ImageDSC00766c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00771c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00778c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00842c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00843c by John Little, on Flickr
Picked my spot to watch the sun go down, back at Red Geo.

ImageDSC00844c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00848c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00855c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00870c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00871c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00875c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00876c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00883c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00901c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00902c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00929c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00946c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC00979c by John Little, on Flickr
Next morning.

ImageDSC01006c by John Little, on Flickr
Opted for a bit of road walking.

ImageDSC01012c by John Little, on Flickr
Passing Ward Hill's south east corrie.

ImageDSC01014c by John Little, on Flickr
Looking back to Black Nev -I was doing one post per minute and two hours forty five minutes for the whole of the road walk.

ImageDSC01015c by John Little, on Flickr
Dwarfie Hammars.

ImageDSC01016c by John Little, on Flickr
Last leg to the coast.

ImageDSC01019c by John Little, on Flickr
Dwarfie Hammars again.

ImageDSC01041c by John Little, on Flickr
Coulags -my first WH report.

ImageDSC01042c by John Little, on Flickr
Haist.

ImageDSC01047c by John Little, on Flickr
Coulags again.

ImageDSC01055c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC01056c by John Little, on Flickr
Ward Hill and Coulags.

ImageDSC01059c by John Little, on Flickr
Almost there.

ImageDSC01062c by John Little, on Flickr
Handy waiting room with loos and books.

ImageDSC01063c by John Little, on Flickr
The last few metres.

ImageDSC01079c by John Little, on Flickr
Rora Head and yesterday's route up beyond.

ImageDSC01084c by John Little, on Flickr

ImageDSC01098c by John Little, on Flickr
Back soon hopefully.

Two videos; one with my flip camera and one with my new camera:






our_route.gpx Open full screen  NB: Walkhighlands is not responsible for the accuracy of gpx files in users posts

User avatar
litljortindan
Mountaineer
 
Posts: 1957
Munros:115   Corbetts:58
Grahams:28   Donalds:1
Sub 2000:47   Hewitts:12
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Joined: Dec 11, 2011

Re: Burnmouth to Moaness via Craig Gate and Lyrie Geo.

Postby litljortindan » Sun Jul 16, 2017 2:16 pm

First outing for my new camera and I'm reasonably pleased with it so far. In retrospect a good walk for a bad knee and a walk where my water filter came into its own.
User avatar
litljortindan
Mountaineer
 
Posts: 1957
Munros:115   Corbetts:58
Grahams:28   Donalds:1
Sub 2000:47   Hewitts:12
Wainwrights:10   
Joined: Dec 11, 2011

Re: Burnmouth to Moaness via Craig Gate and Lyrie Geo.

Postby Alteknacker » Sun Jul 16, 2017 9:32 pm

What an amazing place, and really great pics. Apart from the "Old Man" I had absolutely no idea what Hoy was like.

This reports joins quite a few recently that demonstrate that you don't have to be flogging up/on top of an high hill to be in a great place. :clap: :clap: :clap:
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Alteknacker
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Posts: 3129
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Joined: May 25, 2013
Location: Effete South (of WIgan, anyway)

Re: Burnmouth to Moaness via Craig Gate and Lyrie Geo.

Postby litljortindan » Tue Jul 18, 2017 3:54 pm

Alteknacker wrote:What an amazing place, and really great pics. Apart from the "Old Man" I had absolutely no idea what Hoy was like.

This reports joins quite a few recently that demonstrate that you don't have to be flogging up/on top of an high hill to be in a great place. :clap: :clap: :clap:


Thanks. Can definitely recommend Hoy if you like coastal scenery.
User avatar
litljortindan
Mountaineer
 
Posts: 1957
Munros:115   Corbetts:58
Grahams:28   Donalds:1
Sub 2000:47   Hewitts:12
Wainwrights:10   
Joined: Dec 11, 2011

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