walkhighlands

Share your personal walking route experiences in Scotland, and comment on other peoples' reports.
Warning Please note that hillwalking when there is snow lying requires an ice-axe, crampons and the knowledge, experience and skill to use them correctly. Summer routes may not be viable or appropriate in winter. See winter information on our skills and safety pages for more information.

Nature's Fireworks at Randolph's Leap!

Nature's Fireworks at Randolph's Leap!


Postby jakeyboy » Sat Nov 06, 2010 12:42 pm

Route description: Randolph's Leap from Logie Steading

Date walked: 05/11/2010

Time taken: 2 hours

Distance: 4 km

Register or Login
free to be able to rate and comment on reports (as well as access 1:25000 mapping).

It was Thursday 4th November: Finding myself with a long weekend, I decided to head out to Logie Steading with the intention of taking the walk to Randolph's Leap. Having finished work at 7:00am and with only a few hours kip, I realised I'd left it a little late in the day, but at least If I lost the light, I could enjoy a cup of tea and a scone at the steading, and learn a little background to the history behind Randolph's Leap. Negative on both counts!! I should have done my homework because I got completely lost and ended up doing a circular drive through the countryside beyond Nairn and emerged on the Forres road just west of Brodie!! Note to anyone heading to Logie Steading from Nairn: Do not take the left turn at the signpost for the crazily-named "Fornighty"! Keep going and turn at the signpost for "Relugas"! :lol:

Friday 5th November aka Bonfire Night! Start Again: Having learned my lesson, I did all the homework required, and this time, I entered the postcode for Logie Steading into the Sat-Nav, (Just "Logie Steading", "Logie" or similar got me nowhere! :? ) and off I set.

At first I didn't really take much notice of the weather, It was dry, that's all I needed to know, but I togged myself out in my waterproofs anyway - just in case! Nothing else except some essentials in the old rucksack, no sandwiches, (cafe at Logie) no flask, (cafe at Logie!) just some water and a bag of sweets and off I went. On the right road this time!! :D

The drive to the steading is very pleasant I must say, and as I drove through the woodland I was treated to the beauty of the Autumn colours and distracted by the abundance of the even more colourful Pheasant! The only problem is caused by a lack of signposting, and perhaps the owners of the steading should look into ways of advertising their existence through perhaps the odd helpfully placed sign at a couple of confusing junctions. That said, I did however, have very little problem getting there.

On nearing the steading you cross the river Findhorn a couple of times via the quaintest of stone bridges and the urge to stop should be ignored as this is a very narrow road, and even though the traffic is sparse, stopping at either would doubtless cause problems. As I later found out, one of these bridges actually forms a small part of the walk, presenting the chance to take in the views and take the obligatory photographs!! As I reached the steading I parked in the visitor car park. At around 10:30 mine was the only car there and as I set off past the children's play area to begin my walk the full impact of the Autumn colours became apparent! :shock:
DSCF8862.JPG
Looking back to an Autumnal Logie Steading


I had been told beforehand that this walk could be dangerous, as the cliffs by the river were steep and slippery. The warning sign before the start of the walk seemed to confirm this.
DSCF8868.JPG
The well placed hazard warning at the beginning of the walk to Randolph's Leap.

My first view of the beginning of the walk set the scene for the fantastic array of Autumn colour I was to encounter during this thoroughly enjoyable short walk. The golden browns and yellows mixed with varying hues and shades of red, interspersed still with dashes of green, providing a virtual fireworks display for this 5th of November! (Poetic ain't it?!) At this point I knew there was more to come.
DSCF8986.JPG
Looking down toward the start and first viewpoint.

Still lost in admiration for the beauty of the woodland colours, I set off along the clear and obvious pathway with the odd help of the walkhighlands guide which I'd printed out, (just in case) and it really was very helpful on occasion.

I can't really begin to describe the details of the walk, only to say that the river Fidhorn never ceases to delight in it's differing environments from source to sea. Here is no exception as it wends and roars it's way through the unusual granite-veined gneiss rock formations of a deep gorge hewn by centuries of the seemingly unstoppable torrent which starts high up in the Monadhliath Mountains. Giving way further downstream to shallow, whirling pools and still serenity, eventually melting into the salty waters of Findhorn Bay. This is as ideal a place as any to witness the beauty of this wonderful river.
DSCF8885.JPG
Swirling pools are a feature of the river early on the walk.
DSCF8900.JPG
Unusual rocks with veins of granite become more apparent upstream.
DSCF8909.JPG
Looking downstream from the bridge at the end of the first part of the walk.

After the bridge at the half way point of the walk, there is a short unpaved stretch of road to take you on to the second stretch. A map board gives you your position and interesting information about the history of Randolph's Leap and briefly tells the story of the great Moray floods of 1829. Suitably impressed and intrigued by now, I carried on down this, the more rightly named Randolph's Leap part of the walk. Narrow and steep paths can indeed be dangerous and it is easy to get complacent whilst gawping at the sheer scenic beauty of the gorge and the autumnal adornments, though it did strike me at this point, that this walk would be just as superbly photogenic in a snow-clad winter, (note to self: come back in the winter!) as it is now.
DSCF8925.JPG
Steep narrow paths can be dangerous to the complacent walker.

In my usual reckless pursuit of photographs, I did take a few chances at the rocky, steep and slippery parts of the trek, but although I thoroughly urge others not to take chances of this kind, I think the pictures I got were worth it. :shock: The ultimate goal, that of reaching Randolph's Leap, was a little disappointing really, as the dramatic scenery on the way there, far outdid the relative beauty of the end product. Still, the return journey was just as rewarding as the outward one with the Autumn colours seeming even more vivid.
DSCF8951.JPG
Swirling Findhorn Torrents
DSCF8957.JPG
The view from above the viewpoint at Randolph's Leap!

As always I took a little longer than most, to complete the walk. The reason of course, is simply my love of taking the time to indulge in the beauty of my surroundings. I am a Scot with immense pride in my country, and I try to capture that in my photographs. I am a completely amateur photographer, but I am lucky to live in a country blessed with such beautiful scenery that it would be hard to take a bad photograph of the landscape. I believe I have an eye for a scene however, and hope that these photos are testament to that. Please enjoy them. As for me - this year I will most certainly remember the 5th of November!! :D
DSCF8942.JPG
What good whisky is made from!
DSCF8970.JPG
The Sheer Beauty of Autumn!

PS:- I didn't need my waterproofs as it stayed dry throughout the walk, though the paths were muddy in parts and the trees were still dripping wet from early morning showers. I didn't wait for tea or scones at the steading, but I did have a quick look round the very interesting heritage centre. The car park was filling up as I got back, and almost full as I was leaving, (who needs signposting!?) Rest assured I will return though, since the cafe does come highly commended.
User avatar
jakeyboy
Hill Bagger
 
Posts: 68
Munros:11   Corbetts:3
Grahams:4   
Joined: Sep 9, 2010
Location: Nairn

Re: Nature's Fireworks at Randolph's Leap!

Postby mountain coward » Sat Nov 06, 2010 9:31 pm

I'd far prefer to see those autumn colours to any firework display (but to be honest, I hate fireworks - always have, even as a kid!)... You do get beautiful autumn colours in Scotland - I noticed that when I was up last week. I couldn't take my eyes off them as I was driving around. Pity we don't get them any more down here in Yorkshire - our leaves just dry up and drop off within a few days - most don't change colour at all :(
mountain coward
 

Re: Nature's Fireworks at Randolph's Leap!

Postby jakeyboy » Sat Nov 06, 2010 10:32 pm

mountain coward wrote:I'd far prefer to see those autumn colours to any firework display (but to be honest, I hate fireworks - always have, even as a kid!)... You do get beautiful autumn colours in Scotland - I noticed that when I was up last week. I couldn't take my eyes off them as I was driving around. Pity we don't get them any more down here in Yorkshire - our leaves just dry up and drop off within a few days - most don't change colour at all :(


I agree m c! Not a great fan of fireworks either, and sad to hear your trees don't colour for long, but you are always welcome in Scotland mate!! :wink:
User avatar
jakeyboy
Hill Bagger
 
Posts: 68
Munros:11   Corbetts:3
Grahams:4   
Joined: Sep 9, 2010
Location: Nairn

Re: Nature's Fireworks at Randolph's Leap!

Postby mountain coward » Sat Nov 06, 2010 11:39 pm

Don't worry - I spend a lot of time up there! I'm up most months Munroing :D I always seem to catch the very worst of your weather though each time :( :lol:
mountain coward
 

Re: Nature's Fireworks at Randolph's Leap!

Postby kevsbald » Sun Nov 07, 2010 2:23 pm

Fantastic stuff.
User avatar
kevsbald
Munro compleatist
 
Posts: 2176
Munros:264   Corbetts:119
Grahams:76   Donalds:51
Sub 2000:13   Hewitts:9
Wainwrights:15   
Joined: Jan 15, 2009
Location: Glasgow

Register or Login
free to be able to rate and comment on reports (as well as access 1:25000 mapping).




Walkhighlands community forum is advert free


Your generosity keeps this site running.
Can you help support Walkhighlands and the online community by donating by direct debit?



Return to Walk reports - Scotland

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: 03oroc, Dave McG, matt2901 and 56 guests