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Heat 1: Fisherfields 7+2 round with cloud inversion

Heat 1: Fisherfields 7+2 round with cloud inversion


Postby Alteknacker » Sun Jul 01, 2018 1:43 pm

Route description: Fisherfield 6, from Shenavall

Munros included on this walk: A' Mhaighdean, Beinn Tarsuinn, Mullach Coire Mhic Fhearchair, Ruadh Stac Mor, Sgurr Ban

Corbetts included on this walk: Beinn a'Chaisgein Mor, Beinn a'Chlaidheimh

Date walked: 26/06/2018

Time taken: 15 hours

Distance: 35.5 km

Ascent: 3161m

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With the astonishing high pressure area over the country continuing, I had to get back up north again - it was just a question of picking the days.

Having been barbecued before on Scottish hills, I knew that pure sun was challenging from the perspective of managing hydration, so cloudless skies in combination with high temperatures would not be ideal. But who can resist when fine weather of whatever stripe is predicted for the Highlands? I plumped for driving up on the Monday, and walking on the Tuesday and Wednesday.

On the Sunday, the forecast looked like this:-
Image

And I realised that the various routes that I'd been planning - relatively far south - were all based around my being in employment, rather than retired, and that there was now nothing to stop me going a long way north. Initially I thought of the Fannichs, but then a number of them do not look especially inspiring, and anyway I wanted a round in which I'd be camping out, rather than a single day blitz.

Fisherfield has had a great allure for me ever since I read a good few years ago Spiderweb's report of his 2 days there - it looked absolutely wonderful, with 3 of the finest mountains in the Highlands in the immediate area: An Teallach, Beinn Dearg Mor, and A'Mhaighdean. And the legendary Shenevall bothy right in the heart of this wilderness (In his "Walking the Munros", Steve Kew says that the 16th century map maker, TImothy Pont, covered his map of the area with the very apposite words "Extreme Wilderness").

Decision made. I started off thinking about the 5 main Munros, but soon got over-ambitious and included the Corbetts as possibles in the planning, without, however, checking on the likely duration of such a round. In the event, I ran out of time (and, sadly, energy also) so didn't manage to include the Beinn Deargs. Which is probably a good thing, because when I first saw a picture of Beinn Dearg Mor, I swore to myself that I'd walk the whole of its summit ridge and really take my time to savour it. Now I have a strong reason to go back (if one were at all necessary...).

So this is the route I ended up doing...

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An Teallach was planned for the second day.

I set off from the Midlands at 6.30am, with a view to arriving at Dundonnell at about 16.00, leaving plenty of time for the walk into Shenevall. On the way there was a serious crash on the A9, which caused most people caught up in it hours of delay; but fortunately for me I was able to take the parallel single track road that bypassed the problem, and lost less than an hour.

The pulse quickened noticeably as the unmistakable outline of An Teallach came into view, and shortly thereafter I was parked up in the last remaining space in the parking layby just above Dundonnell House.

As I was getting myself dressed and packed, a Dutch (from the accent) threesome arrived at the car park. They’d had 5 days in Fisherfield, and to judge from their colour, a very fine 5 days at that. I was surprised that they were wearing shorts, and asked them about midges and clegs, punctuating my question with a deadly accurate blow to my thigh which despatched one of the latter to the fires of cleg hell! (where I suppose there's eternal smell of blood, but no blood to get at!). They said they’d had no real problems with either, and that there were very few midges. I have to say, I was astonished, but kept my scepticism to myself.

Image20180625_165253. For those who haven't been to Shenevall, the walk-in is a fantastic prelude to the dramatic wilderness interior, as mountain after mountain progressively reveals itself, and one's excitement progressively mounts.

Image20180625_182441. Here the Beinn Deargs in the evening sun, viewed on the descent to Shenevall - tantalisingly part-obscured by the heat haze in the glare of the setting sun...

Image20180625_183000. Beinn Dearg Mor always reminds me of the St Helens volcano in Alaska, looking as it does like a volcano with half the side blown away by a mega-explosion. Every bit as dramatic and impressive as all the pics of it that I've ogled over the years! Shenevall bothy is visible just left of centre, lower part of pic, surrounded by the signature bright green grass of bothies, blessed with decades of nitrogenous fertilizer...

Image20180625. There were loads of these fellahs (Southern Hawkers, I believe) all the way - real beauties, little changed in hundreds of millions of years.

Image20180625_183916. Sail Liath to the north was beautifully illuminated in the evening sun, all warm enticing colours and subtle shadows, and looked absolutely stunning. It rather reminds me of Liathach viewed from the south side of Loch Torridon.

Image20180625_191520. After pitching my tent 20 or 30m away from the bothy (this is the view of Beinn a'Chlaidheimh, looking south from Shenevall - promising a great walk), and then “carb-loading” on pasta, I retired to bed in preparation for an early start on the morrow. Also the pleasant breeze that had been blowing when I arrived died down, and the beasties came out in full force.
Image
The dutch folk I'd spoken to earlier must be seriously hardy, if not out-and-out pachyderms!

I set my alarm for 04.00am, but fortunately woke up just before it was due to go off - fortunately, because it didn't actually work :( . Having prepared everything the night before, I managed - for once - to get off quite sharpish...
Image...exiting the tent in full midgie battle gear :D.

It being principally a ridge route that I'd planned, I'd packed 2.5 litres of water, and was assuming that I'd manage to find at least some streams/springs in bealachs to make up the additional 2.5 litres I'd surely need if the weather turned out as forecast.

Image20180626_042544. The first challenge was crossing the Abhainn Srath na Sealga; but the water was way lower than normal, and the rubble bags expedient worked perfectly. On the other side of the river is a very extensive bog; but after all the dry weather it was navigable without getting wet feet, and I was soon on the 800m pull up Beinn a'Chlaidheimh...

Image

Image20180626_050901. Pic looking back towards Loch na Sealga. The forecast mist seemed to have materialised; at least it meant that it would be relatively cool for the hard slog of the initial big ascent.

Head down, I concentrated on getting up the quite steep slope...

...when suddenly, after about 45 minutes of climbing and I was up at about 750m elevation, there was a glint of sunlight through the clouds above me. I hardly dared articulate the hope - but, no disappointment: in a matter of 10 minutes or so I was up and above a cracking cloud inversion :D .

I've seen so many by now, but the thrill of experiencing one is pretty well as strong as when I saw my first. BIIIIIIIGGGG grin :D - which didn't leave my face for at least an hour!

Image20180626_053945. First just a wee hint (the summit ridge of Beinn Dearg Mor)...

Image20180626_055824. ...then progressively more: here BDM (left) An Teallach (right).

The shadow of Beinn a'Chlaidheimh was cast strongly on to the top of the inversion, and I spent a good while trying to get into a Brocken Spectre position, wandering up, down and along the side of the hill, standing on elevated rocks, etc. - until I realised that a person-sized shape was not going to show on the cloud top :roll: - duuuhhhh!

Image20180626_062639. Ahead: the summit. Beautiful easy walking after the long pull up on to the ridge.

Image20180626_062728. Looking back north along the ridge, the unmistakable silhouette of An Teallach...

Image20180626_062734. ...and west north west , Beinn Deargs Mor and Beag.

Image20180626_062917. Looking south along the ridge towards the summit again. Behind, from right to left are: Sgurr Ban, Mullach Coire Mhic Fhearchair, Sgurr Dubh (east top of MCMF), and finally the sweeping arc of Creag Rainich to the left.

Image20180626_062917. Labelled.

Image20180626_063831. ...and south west from the summit itself, Beinn Tarsuinn featuring centre pic, with the Tennis Court standing out clearly just to the right of BT summit. Not so clear on the pic unless one views it on a big screen, but on the day it was very striking. I'd never heard of it before, and was curious as to what the very geometrical shape could be.

Image20180626_063858. The vistas before me were quite literally breathtaking - the whole of the West Highlands extending gloriously in all directions. It's very hard to assimilate and internalise spectacular beauty on this scale. As always, photography simply cannot do justice to the reality; but one gets at least a slight hint of how it was by viewing the pano on as large a screen as possible. (for me that's: right click on the image; click "view image" on the dropdown menu that appears).

Image20180626_063858 Labelled.

Image0180626_064705. View east. I think I have a decent excuse for being enthralled by cloud inversions....

Image20180626_064647.

Image20180626_070408. Looking back from the bealach Am Briseadh towards Beinn a' Chlaidheimh.

Image20180626_070751. Ahead Sgurr Ban, and in the bealach, Loch a' Bhrisidh..

All this is perfect ridge walking: the ascents and descents not too steep to require much concentration, and fantastic views in every direction.

Image20180626_072308. Looking back south the way I'd just come...

Image20180626_080930. It's a fair old pull up on to Sgurr Ban - at least it felt it: a "mere" 350m ascent, but it did take a while... This pic is looking just west of south across the quartzite boulder plain towards Mullach Coire Mhic Fhearchair.

Image20180626_081734. A bit further along, the rather ferociously steep ascent path to MCMF becomes more visible, with the east top and Sgurr Dubh just to the left (south west) of the Munro summit, and Beinn Tarsuinn and the tennis court to the right of it.

Image20180626_084434. And looking back at Sgurr Ban, from close to the summit of MCMF.

Image20180626_085116. On the summit, looking south west towards Beinn Tarsuinn, with Slioch immediately behind (centre pic).

Image20180626_085153. And looking back north, the cloud seemed to be rising...

Now I headed south east for the out-and-back to the two Munro tops of MCMF...
Image20180626_090257. First, the unnamed top at 981m elevation... (this pic looking back north west towards MCMF) ...

... where I sat for 5 minutes or so, chewing on a breakfast marmalade croissant and luxuriating in the stunning scenery, before heading off to ...
Image20180626_090713. ... Sgurr Dubh. Which turned out to be one of the highlights of the day: a short but exhilarating scramble (grade 1/2) along a mini ridge, rather reminiscent of Aonach Eagach or Crib Goch, but in miniature - a real gem!

Image20180626_091227.

Image20180626_091803.

Image20180626_092118. Lovely jubbly!!

Image20180626_092636. Alas the summit was reached all too soon. This pic is looking back north west towards MCMF main summit and other top.

Image20180626_092703. Then back the way I came, varying the scrambles as much as possible.

Image20180626_094335. Looking back, Sgurr Dubh shows a slightly different but equally dramatic character, now that the cloud has disappeared.

Image20180626_103213. Rather than reascending the 981m top and MCMF itself, I opted to contour around the side; which given the very steep bouldery nature of the slope (roughly centre of the pic) probably wasn't a great idea - certainly it took a long time to get around and on to the ascent to Beinn Tarsuinn.

Image20180626_105226. Once on the ascent however, it was pretty straightforward, and it didn't take too long to get to the summit. (Pic looking north east along the ridge i've just traversed).

Image20180626_105246. And just ahead along the ridge is the tennis court (centre pic). In the middle background above Loch Fada are Sgurr an Thuill Bhain (to the left) and Slioch (to the right). In the far background left of Sgurr an Thuill Bhain are 3 pimples, which I think are, going left to right: Sgurr an Fhir Dhuibhe, Sgurr Ban, and Spidean Coire nan Clach (anyone who knows better, please correct me if I'm wrong here).

Image20180626_105255. A little further round are A'Mhaighdean and Ruadh Stac Mor, with - in the gap between them, far background - Beinn a'Chaisgein Mor. This latter, the furthest I intended to venture west on the day, seemed a very long way off! Indeed A'Mhaigdhean, the next target, also looked far enough... :roll:

I set off down the ridge, taking a slight detour to investigate the tennis court - which is quite impressive, but in fact more so at a distance than close up.
Image20180626_110842.

Image20180626_111526. I followed the shoulder of Tarsuinn round almost to the end, before dropping off to the west down into Pollan na Muice. This was fine going down - but it's a long way down; and the ascent back up the other side to A'Mhaighdean is over 500m :roll: . It was now very hot. Nothwithstanding having drunk at pretty well every flowing water source I'd passed - I guess I'd downed at least 5 litres (plus regular magnesium tablets) by this time - my mouth still invariable got parched within a few minutes of each drink. On occasions like this I reflect with some astonishment on the body's ability to pass such quantities of liquid through it, and get it all out via perspiration :roll: .

Image20180626_113835. But the going was good under foot, and the slope not too steep. Slowly but steadily I sweated my way up towards the summit (to the left - the summit to the right is Ruadh Stac Mor).

The views continued to catch my attention, such that I had to stop frequently to admire them and take a few snaps (that's my excuse, and I'm sticking to it!! :D ).

Image20180626_115551. This is looking back towards Beinn Tarsuinn.

Really quite a dull trudge in the sense of the terrain changing little, but especially compared to the staggeringly amazing sights once one gets to the summit. I was reasonably well prepared for visual drama, having looked at reports by the likes of litljortindan, Mountainlove and many others; but nothing compared with the reality. It is truly stunning, and, as others have commented, fully justifies the hype.

Image20180626_125439. Looking north west again, this time from the summit.

What's so spectacular about this hill is the combination of massive panoramic views in every direction, with the drama of the huge drops down to Gorm Loch Mor... It's difficult to take it all in...

Image20180626_124841. ... Gorm Loch Mor ...

Image20180626_124829. ...600m drop...

Image20180626_125515. Most of the hills I'd traversed during the morning, and on the LHS, the next target: Ruadh Stac Mor.

Image20180626_125515. Labelled

Definitely this wasn't a place to leave in a hurry, so I sat down next to the cairn, munching on my cheeze-salami-and-Branston-Pickle sandwiches, and slowly assimilating the views in every direction. Simple wonderful - well beyond any words.

After about 20 minutes or so I reluctantly got to my feet, stretched my ancient limbs, and set off towards Ruadh Stac Mor - at this point I was still thinking in terms of getting up the Beinn Deargs. Shortly after starting the descent, I met a couple of fellow walkers aiming to do the 6. After a brief chat, we went our separate ways (it turned out they were also staying at Shenevall).

Image20180626_131741. On the descent from A'Mhaigdhean, looking north west across Loch Fionn.

Image20180626_132429. Just wild!

I followed the ridge north to the 948 spot height, before cutting down east into Poll Eadar dha Stac (the bealach between it and Ruadh Stac Mor).

Image20180626_134850. Fuar Loch Mor viewed from the bealach.

Image From A'Mhaigdhean, the south face of Ruadh Stac Mor looked too steep for a direct ascent; and indeed it looked pretty intimidating on the map also, the contours being VERY closely packed for the initial half of the ascent.

On closer inspection, however, it became clear that there are a number of gaps in the cliffs that allow access - steep to be sure, but quite doable, and without scrambling if this is something you want to avoid. And the total ascent from the lowest point in the bealach is only about 170m :D .

Image20180626_141745. Looking back from the summit of Ruadh Stac Mor back towards A'Mhaigdhean. During the short ascent of RSM, the sky had become covered in a haze (as can be seen on this pic), which made for somewhat more comfortable walking.

Image20180626_142730. To the north, Beinn a'Chaisgein Mor looked a daunting (at this point in the day) distance away, though in fact it's only about 5 1/2 km and 400m of ascent. I was feeling pretty tired at this point, in part as a consequence of the heat I suppose, and that probably contributed to a sense that this was getting pretty hard.

I headed north to the end of the ridge, and then cut off to the right to avoid cliffs shown on the map, before again continuing north.

Image20180626_151549. As can be seen on this pic looking back, this was the definitely the right thing to do - the cliffs at the end of the ridge are not insignificant. The first part of the descent was hardish work because of boulders...

Image20180626_150748. .... but as the slope eased, so did the terrain, and it was just a question of bog hopping across the flat areas. Generally I was surprised at the large number of boggy areas that were still wet, given the very long spell of dry weather we'd had.
This view is looking west, and Beinn a'Chaisgein Mor is about 1/3 of the way in from the left of the pic.

Image20180626_152723. There was very little flow from Lochan Feith Mhic' -illean, so it was easy to cross.

Then it was just a long, not-too-steep slog up to the summit. Since the summit wasn't visible until I got quite close to it, I found it necessary to take regular compass bearings to ensure I was headed in the right direction. The main issue was that clegs had stepped up their activity, and became really quite a nuisance. The smidge on my legs and arms seemed to be pretty effective, but they kept trying - and sometimes succeeding - to land on my top. I amused myself by despatching as many as I could to the cleg hereafter....
Image

I reached the summit shortly before 16.30, not feeling quite as sprightly as when I'd set off 12 hours earlier :roll: .

Image20180626_162448. The summit is nothing special in itself, but, as all day, the views in every direction were magnificent - this looking west.

The sky had greyed in further, and - amazingly - there were odd spots of rain.

Image20180626_161750. Pano looking east from the summit.

Image20180626_161750. Labelled, and showing all the hills I've walked during the day, except the two MCHF tops.

When planning the route I'd noticed that there's an extended line of cliffs on the south west side of Srath Beinn Dearg (Chadachan Rhiabhach), so I'd studied the contours fairly carefully in order to plot out a route that had a good chance of not leading me into downclimbing difficulty.

Image. In hindsight, I probably could have taken a slightly shorter alternative route, but at this point I was still half-hoping to get to the Beinn Deargs...

After a breather to enjoy the views, I headed off north east from the summit towards Lochan na Bearta. There are a couple of wee lochans that one can see initially, and towards which I headed; but once off the higher ground, the lumpy terrain means it's not so easy to be sure one is consistently heading in the right direction, and I took regular compass bearings to ensure I was.

Image20180626_164004. This pic looking north east gives an idea of the terrain. An Teallach background right, and framing it, the Beinn Deargs - Beag to the left, Mor to the right.

Image20180626_165433. On the way, Lochan na Bearta. The grassy terrain makes for quite easy walking. Clear in the background in rather splendid isolation is (I believe) Sail Mhor - it looks like a characterful hill. It occurred to me that it could be combined with An Teallach to make for a pretty good ridge walk ...

Image20180626_170804. Lochan na Bearta has a rather fine beach. A longish way to lug a deckchair, though... :wink: And at this point it's actually raining, as can be seen from the ripple patterns on the water surface... :shock: :wtf:

Image20180626_175108. The descent from the lochan into the glen via the south bank of the mini valley created by the Allt Lochan na Bearta was on grass and, although quite steep, not problematic. This shot is looking back at it, showing the cliffs I was seeking to avoid.

Now decision point: to go for the Beinn Deargs or not to go for the Beinn Deargs: that was the question. I was now pretty bushed, and to do them would require 4 hours absolute minimum, but more like 5+ hours in my present self-pitying state - some 12km of walk, but much more challenging: a further 1000m of ascent! Moreover, I reasoned quite legitimately: 1. it would be a heck of a waste of prime mountain experience only to touch the summits and not spend time on the ridges; and 2. I would be too exhausted to get the most from them. (This is how one's mind works when one is k*******d, and the body is in self-preservation mode :roll: ).

So I opted to save them for another day, and instead take the route back to Shenevall via Srath Beinn Dearg and Gleann na Muice.

There's not path, and it's astonishingly boggy close to the allt itself, so I took a route about 20 or so metres above the low point, which worked out OK. It's rough country, with no path, so a bit slow but not difficult (except for having to deal with the omnipresent clegs!).

Image20180626_184846. An hour or so later I get to Loch Beinn Dearg. This shot is looking up at the cliffs above the south east side of the loch, taken just before I reached the it.

Shortly after the lake, the track in Gleann na Muice came into sight, and I thankfully headed for it. A crossing of Abhain Gleann na Muice opposite the stalking accommodation at Larachantivore, and of the Abhain Srath na Sealga at the same point as I crossed it in the morning at the start of the walk, saw me back to Shenevall shortly before 19.30.

The beer I'd carried out tasted absolutely wonderful, although I had to consume it inside my tent as there was no wind at all, and the bloodsuckers were swarming in their millions! I amused myself squidging against the tent the astonishing number of midgies that had managed to follow me into the tent...

Image

7 + 2?? 5 Munros + 2 Corbetts = 7 peaks; plus 2 tops.

Image3D view of route.

PS this was the view of the Deargs on the way back out from Shenevall the next morning...

Image20180627_070021.

I will be back!!!
Last edited by Alteknacker on Sat Jul 07, 2018 12:19 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Heat 1: Fisherfields 7+2 round with cloud inversion

Postby Renegade Scot » Sun Jul 01, 2018 5:43 pm

Great stuff and very nice report. Just finished the round as well last Friday having taken 2 days and an overnight camp to get round. Have to say the weather was amazing but really thought I had bitten off more than I could chew with the temperatures.
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Re: Heat 1: Fisherfields 7+2 round with cloud inversion

Postby ScotFinn65 » Sun Jul 01, 2018 7:31 pm

Great report and fabulous pictures.

I know l must speak for a lot of people when l say:

Thanks for taking the time to write such a descriptive and extensive account of your walk.

Not only is it an excellent read but it is tremendously inspiring for those of us who are planning similar walks and are searching for ideas and guidance.

The commentary is very comprehensive and interspersing with the photos really gives a perspective of your achievement.

THANK YOU !
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Re: Heat 1: Fisherfields 7+2 round with cloud inversion

Postby Driftwood » Mon Jul 02, 2018 9:03 pm

Thanks Alteknacker, a fantastic walk and report that does it justice!

I walked the main Fisherfield horseshoe (including the 2 Munro Tops, but without Beinn a' Chaisgein Mor) a couple of days before you, a very fine Sunday, postponed due to wind and cloud the day before. Report to follow, eventually. Maybe thanks to the winds and cool before, I can confirm that there weren't any midges or clegs to speak of when approaching from Lochivraoin, or camped at the bealach SE of A' Mhaighdean. Though clegs started to put in an appearance the next day, heading out to Achnashellach.

After seeing Beinn Dearg Mor, I'm also determined to get up and walking it, with the time and energy to enjoy it and some of the neighbours. And, like you, I felt that Sgurr Dubh was a highlight of the circuit, which it'd be a shame to miss out because it's "only" a Top.

The dragonfly in your photo is Golden Ringed. They're only found in the Highlands (I think the northwest particularly; I've seen them in Affric, near Kintail, Ben Wyvis and beyond).
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Re: Heat 1: Fisherfields 7+2 round with cloud inversion

Postby Alteknacker » Wed Jul 04, 2018 10:21 am

Renegade Scot wrote:Great stuff and very nice report. Just finished the round as well last Friday having taken 2 days and an overnight camp to get round. Have to say the weather was amazing but really thought I had bitten off more than I could chew with the temperatures.


Yes, it was brutal! I must have drunk well over 8 litres during the course of the day!

ScotFinn65 wrote:Great report and fabulous pictures.

I know l must speak for a lot of people when l say:

Thanks for taking the time to write such a descriptive and extensive account of your walk.

Not only is it an excellent read but it is tremendously inspiring for those of us who are planning similar walks and are searching for ideas and guidance.

The commentary is very comprehensive and interspersing with the photos really gives a perspective of your achievement.

THANK YOU !


Thanks for the kind words, SF. I'm very happy if the report proves useful to any WHs, since that's one of the reasons I write up my walks.

Driftwood wrote:Thanks Alteknacker, a fantastic walk and report that does it justice!


Thanks for the kind words.

Driftwood wrote:I walked the main Fisherfield horseshoe ... Report to follow, eventually.

I await it with anticipation!

Driftwood wrote:... I can confirm that there weren't any midges or clegs to speak of ...


That's astonishing: they must have started more or less immediately after your walk, and that over the whole of the Highlands. One only has to look at the Forum to see what a plague has erupted. Boy, were you lucky :thumbup:.

Driftwood wrote:After seeing Beinn Dearg Mor, I'm also determined to get up and walking it, with the time and energy to enjoy it and some of the neighbours. And, like you, I felt that Sgurr Dubh was a highlight of the circuit, which it'd be a shame to miss out because it's "only" a Top.


Great minds.... :D

Driftwood wrote:The dragonfly in your photo is Golden Ringed. They're only found in the Highlands (I think the northwest particularly; I've seen them in Affric, near Kintail, Ben Wyvis and beyond).

Yes, having checked pics of both the golden ringed an the southern hawker I can see I was mistaken. Thanks for the inf.
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Re: Heat 1: Fisherfields 7+2 round with cloud inversion

Postby rockhopper » Wed Jul 04, 2018 1:12 pm

If there's a tough challenging way or an easier, more straightforward way to do something, I suspect you'll always gravitate towards the fomer :shock: :wink: Great trip and you don't often get such good inversion shots - cheers :)
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Re: Heat 1: Fisherfields 7+2 round with cloud inversion

Postby PerthAlly » Wed Jul 04, 2018 1:39 pm

A sensational walk report :clap:

Your photo's are perfect Alteknacker.

Tackling those in this heat is no mean achievement. I actually decided against walking on Sunday past for that very reason. Finding running water just now is an issue. I was in the Cairngorms two weeks ago and there was little to be had :?

Well done again
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Re: Heat 1: Fisherfields 7+2 round with cloud inversion

Postby Alteknacker » Fri Jul 06, 2018 11:47 pm

PerthAlly wrote:A sensational walk report :clap:

Your photo's are perfect Alteknacker.

Tackling those in this heat is no mean achievement. I actually decided against walking on Sunday past for that very reason. Finding running water just now is an issue. I was in the Cairngorms two weeks ago and there was little to be had :?

Well done again


Thanks very much for the compliments, PA. As I always say, the pics have very little to do with me, and everything to do with the place.

You're right about the water generally - although, rather to my surprise, I managed to find sufficient small burns and springs to manage OK (even if the water was disconcertingly warm in some :roll: ), and even to get back to camp with half a litre or so still in my sac. I'd reckoned that there would be some water in the bealachs after Beinn Tarsuinn, A'Mhaighdean, and Ruadh Stac Mor, and this proved correct. There were also quite a few other small burns. But you never can tell - it's hard to know in advance, and I remember the Cairngorms as being particularly dry over the wide areas of the plateau.
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Re: Heat 1: Fisherfields 7+2 round with cloud inversion

Postby malky_c » Sat Jul 07, 2018 12:08 am

A quick skim of that shows me that there's far too much good stuff to take in with the limited time I have available - I will definitely be back for a proper read 8)
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Re: Heat 1: Fisherfields 7+2 round with cloud inversion

Postby dav2930 » Sat Jul 07, 2018 11:17 pm

Really superb AK, what a marvellous trip. Wild camping is surely an essential part of the Fisherfield experience - it'd be a shame to miss it, especially in weather like that. Those cloud inversions are breathtaking - and that's just your photos! The scramble out to Sgurr Dubh looked great too - I missed that on my round. I loved these mountains and will never forget them. Altogether a first rate report and set of photos. :clap:
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Re: Heat 1: Fisherfields 7+2 round with cloud inversion

Postby HalfManHalfTitanium » Sun Jul 08, 2018 11:44 am

Absolutely magnificent.

Epic! (both the route, and the stunning photos)

Tim
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Re: Heat 1: Fisherfields 7+2 round with cloud inversion

Postby zatapathique » Mon Jul 23, 2018 5:53 pm

Amazing photos, especially the ones from above the inversion, and certainly a great feat to accomplish. Congratulations, and I don't think you need to feel bad for not having included the Beinn Deargs.

Even so you were so fast compared to my 22h for only 5+1 hills. :wink:

Sgùrr Dubh certainly looks great. Sometimes I regret not having the time and energy to do more than the main Munro summits - but I always tell myself I will be back one day. So much more to explore around Fisherfield, the beach at Lochan na Bearta alone would be worth going there.

I'm glad I'm not the only one who found the walk up Sgùrr Ban tedious. :D

And so many midges more than a month earlier :shock: - and I didn't see any clegs at all. But no dragonflies either. :(

If you permit, I'll cross-reference to my report here, they go together nicely, I think.
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8 people think this report is great.
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