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Bidean Nam Bian

Bidean Nam Bian


Postby maxie23 » Fri Aug 31, 2018 9:36 pm

Route description: Bidean nam Bian

Munros included on this walk: Bidean nam Bian, Stob Coire Sgreamhach

Date walked: 28/08/2018

Time taken: 9 hours

Distance: 18 km

Ascent: 1583m

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Arrived at the smaller of the two car parks on the A82 and was ready to go at 06.45 .
There was a cold wind blowing down through the glen so it was on with the jacket, hat and gloves.
The views across to the Three Sisters were wonderful, even on such a cold, damp and cloudy morning.ImageGearr Aonach by robert irvine, on FlickrImageBeinn Fhada left Gearr Aonach right by robert irvine, on FlickrImageGearr Aonach left, Aonach Dubh right, Coire nan Lochan middle by robert irvine, on Flickr
Walking down from the car park, you could see the ascent path winding it's way up Coire nan Lochan.ImageAscent path up Coire nan Lochan by robert irvine, on Flickr
The River Coe is crossed on a footbridge here.ImageFootbridge over River Coe by robert irvine, on Flickr
The weather coming down the glen was looking a little bit wet.ImageRain sweeping down Glencoe by robert irvine, on Flickr
Passed a couple of tents pitched on a scenic spot.ImageTent pitch with lovely outlook by robert irvine, on Flickr
The path up the Coire is well constructed with only a couple of tricky bits, nothing too difficult.
The rain was really thumping down now with a cold wind blowing.ImagePath up Coire nan Lochan by robert irvine, on Flickr
Looking back down, the clouds were whipping along the Aonach Eagach at a furious rate of knots.ImageAngry looking Aonach Eagach by robert irvine, on Flickr
Further up the Coire, the rain began to lessen and there were even glimpses of the sun peeping through the clouds, still a nippy wind though.ImageCoire nan Lochan by robert irvine, on FlickrImageLovely waterfalls by robert irvine, on FlickrImageView up to top of Coire nan Lochan by robert irvine, on FlickrImageView back down by robert irvine, on FlickrImageBit of sun on ridge by robert irvine, on Flickr
I was following the W.H. route and as instructed, I turned right just before the box waterfall, crossed the stream and quickly picked up traces of the path heading up to the ridge.ImageCrossing over stream as you break right from path by robert irvine, on FlickrImagePath up to ridge by robert irvine, on FlickrImagePath further up by robert irvine, on FlickrImageView back down (2) by robert irvine, on Flickr
Before long, you get your first proper look at the famous buttresses, with the summit behind.
ImageButresses with a misty summit behind by robert irvine, on Flickr
Unfortunately, the next bank of clouds was rolling up through the Coire.ImageCloud coming up the Coire by robert irvine, on FlickrImageSummit and butresses, misty by robert irvine, on Flickr
Once on the ridge proper, the weather really closed in.
Caught a fleeting glimpse of Glencoe village far below.ImageView from ridge down through clouds towards Glencoe by robert irvine, on Flickr
As noted in previous reports, the walk up past the buttresses is on a reasonably wide ridge and not as scary as the front view suggests.
The mist really added to the eerie atmosphere up here.ImageCreepy or what by robert irvine, on FlickrImageIs that a path down there, good luck by robert irvine, on FlickrImageFabulous by robert irvine, on FlickrImageBalanced rock over big drop. Is that a ghost behind it by robert irvine, on FlickrImageSummit through the clouds by robert irvine, on Flickr
The final pull up to the summit is through a large boulder field. Just pick the easiest looking route and off you go. Bit of an ankle nipper, really cold wind at this stage.ImageBoulder field up to summit by robert irvine, on Flickr
It was a bit of a slog here, really glad to arrive at the summit where the wind dropped considerably. Lovely views of some clouds.ImageStob Coir nan Lochan summit cairn by robert irvine, on Flickr
Anyone who has viewed Wilkie Murray's recent post about his sentimental journey up here https://www.walkhighlands.co.uk/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=83638 will be aware of his only choice of tent pitch at the summit.ImageWilkie Murrays tent pitch by robert irvine, on Flickr
Was that a hint of the sun breaking through as I left the summit of Stob Coire nan LochanImageSun almost breaking through by robert irvine, on Flickr
Down through another boulder field to the bealach.ImageSummit from descent through boulder field by robert irvine, on Flickr
This was my view of the ascent from the bealach up to the summit of Bidean nam Bian, doesn't look too scary when you cannot see anything.ImageBealach up to Bidean nam Bian by robert irvine, on Flickr
Nothing too difficult, a couple of minor scrambles and before you know it the cairn appears out of the mist.ImageBidean summit cairn by robert irvine, on Flickr
Again some lovely clouds to admire.
Met a nice young couple from Cumbria here who were on a walking holiday.
The next day they were off to climb Ben Nevis by the C.M.D arete route.
Hope they got on ok, didn't catch their names.
Down off the summit and on the path to Stob Coire Sgreamhach, still misty.ImageOn the ridge to Stob Coire Sgreamhach by robert irvine, on Flickr
Fairly uneventful stroll, not much too see until the summit appeared.ImageSummit Stob Coire Sgreamhach by robert irvine, on Flickr
No views here, so I continued along the ridge a bit until the clouds began to thin and sat at a cairn for a bite to eat.
I was joined by a small unknown bird, I am no ornithologist, that sat on the cairn and chirped away merrily.
I broke some seed of my wholemeal bread and it really seemed to enjoy eating this.
It continued to sit on the top of the cairn all the time I was there. ImageCairn further down ridge by robert irvine, on FlickrImageFriendly bird on cairn, happy chap, or chapess by robert irvine, on Flickr
I took some photos from here through the passing clouds.ImageLooking North East by robert irvine, on Flickr[/url], on FlickrImageDown to Glencoe (2) by robert irvine, on FlickrImageStob Dubh on Buachaille Etive Beag by robert irvine, on FlickrImageBack up to Stob Coire Sgreamhach by robert irvine, on FlickrImageBlackwater resevoir in distance by robert irvine, on Flickr
From here, I went back up to Stob Coire Sgreamhach and turned right and headed down onto the ridge up to Beinn Fhada.
It wasn't a long pull up to the summit, but unfortunately the clouds rolled back in again.ImageBeinn Fhada summit by robert irvine, on Flickr
Back along the ridge again to Stob Coire Sgreamhach, as the clouds began to part again.ImageBeinn Fhada with Buachailles behind (2) by robert irvine, on Flickr
I then went back up and over Bidean nam Bian because I wanted to try an alternative descent route down into Coire Gabhail, or the Lost Valley.
The descent down at Bealach Dearg didn't really appeal to me at this stage.ImageStob Coire nan Lochan with Aonach Eagach behiand left by robert irvine, on FlickrImageGlencoe and Loch Leven by robert irvine, on FlickrImageMy descent to Coire Gabhail by robert irvine, on Flickr
Any trace of a path quickly disappeared and I made my way across the bottom of the head wall of the Coire until I picked up the descent path on the opposite side.ImageDown Lost Valley by robert irvine, on FlickrImageAcross to Beinn Fhada from top of Lost Valley by robert irvine, on Flickr
From here, it is an easy enough walk down through some really beautiful scenery on a path that becomes better as you descend.ImageView back up Coire Gabhail, Lost Valley by robert irvine, on Flickr
You have to cross the Allt Coire Gabhail on some dodgy stepping stones just at the end of the Glen and I can imagine this would be fun if the water was any higher.ImageWall of water, end of Coire Gabhail by robert irvine, on Flickr
The last part of the route, from the entrance to Coire Gabhail to the car park is a bit scary at times and busy with tourists heading up the way.
Bit of a long day walking but well worth it.
Unfortunately, on the way home, there was a serious accident on the A82 just past Loch Ba which led to the road being closed indefinitely.
The rumor at the time among fellow motorists was that there had been a fatality, but fortunately this turned out to being not true, just some one injured and not seriously.
As I was travelling back to Falkirk, this meant a diversion back to Glencoe and down the Oban road as far as Connel and then along the A85 throughTaynuilt, then Dalmally and back onto the A82 at Tyndrum.
It was a pleasant enough drive but maybe I could have done without it at that stage.
Was glad to get home .

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User avatar
maxie23
 
Posts: 95
Munros:51   Corbetts:8
Grahams:2   Donalds:3
Sub 2000:3   
Joined: Jul 24, 2015
Location: Falkirk

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