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The Wild Lassies Take on the Fisherfields- an Epic Challenge

The Wild Lassies Take on the Fisherfields- an Epic Challenge


Postby thewildlassielife » Sat Aug 31, 2019 12:51 pm

Route description: Fisherfield 6, from Shenavall

Munros included on this walk: A' Mhaighdean, Beinn Tarsuinn, Mullach Coire Mhic Fhearchair, Ruadh Stac Mor, Sgurr Ban

Corbetts included on this walk: Beinn a'Chlaidheimh

Date walked: 09/06/2018

Time taken: 15.29 hours

Distance: 38.75 km

Ascent: 2351m

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DON’T STOP BELIEVIN’

Written by: The Wild Lassies

Date: August 2019

Munro Count to Date
•Sam: 112
•Cara: 158
•Naomi: 160
•Jen: 166

Distance: 7km in, 38.75km mountains, 7km out.

Ascent: 500m in, 2351m mountains, 500m out.

Time: 15.29hrs

Cara:

If you’re thinking of doing all of the munros then this should be your Everest. Granted I have only done 158 of all of the munros at the time of writing this post but I think I speak for everyone when I say this has been our greatest challenge to date. I did not anticipate how difficult these mountains would be as a day’s walk. We had originally hoped to do this walk in June of 2017 but as we drove up the road on the Friday afternoon, meaning to walk into the Shenavall Bothy that night, the weather forecast for the weekend was not looking great and we decided to abort. The length of the walk would be too long to be exposed to bad weather conditions for the whole time especially when there was no way to dry off afterwards as we would be sleeping in a tent.


Jen:

We decided early on Friday actually that the Fisherfield 6 were not safe (and would definitely not be fun) to do that weekend. This worked in my favour actually; I was not happy with my backpack and had not been able to attach my part of the tent securely to it. We were all still keen to head north though and we spent a few hours researching where we could camp and what Munros we could attempt to climb instead. This was a separate adventure though that deserves its own page! It’s important to mention here though as it was a good experience that showed us that retreating from long standing plans due to the weather was the correct response not only for safety but for our enjoyment of what Scotland has to offer both on and off the hills.

So a year later (2018), we returned to tackle the Fisherfields. We went up in June for maximum daylight, and while the forecast wasn’t perfect we decided it was worth giving the walk a try.

On the 8th of June we left our respective cities and headed up to the layby at Corrie Hallie where we parked the car. On the way we stopped off at the Aultguish Inn to eat as much as we possibly could before walking into the Sheneval Bothy with incredibly large bags. We phoned ahead as the kitchen didn’t open until 4:30pm and we anticipated arriving at 4pm. They very kindly obliged and once we’d eaten, we changed out of our normal clothes into our walking clothes and drove the last 30mins to the start point.


Having parked the car we then set about loading our bags, complete with sleeping bags and tents onto our backs. Our tent was not designed for trekking with and neither were our sleeping bags and roll mats. We were laden with equipment and struggled to get the bags onto our backs once fully assembled as can be seen from this wonderful slo-mo video.


ImageFisherfields by Cara Morison, on Flickr

The walk to the bothy was more difficult than we had imagined, climbing 500m in height and then descending at the other side was not easy with these large heavy bags. It was a walk that took longer than expected but as we descended into the Shenavall Valley we were treated to the most beautiful sunset over Loch na Sealga.

Naomi:

I’m going to interject at this point and say that the beauty of that sunset did NOTHING to make me enjoy this walk in! I didn’t realise until too late that I’d packed my bag all wrong and hadn’t adjusted it for my body so it was incredible uncomfortable the whole time. I was not a happy camper.

And see the Pringles on that bag? They fell off a number of times en route, and each time was a battle to pick them up without taking the bag off and/or falling over. We knew that if a bag came off, it wasn’t going to go back on easily.


ImageFisherfields by Cara Morison, on Flickr

ImageFisherfields by Cara Morison, on Flickr


We arrived at the bothy about 9pm to find a few other people there, some camping and some staying inside the bothy. The campers were packing up, having just completed the Fisherfield 6, and they were heading out the way we’d just come in. They seemed to have had a good day and completed in good time and so I was encouraged, thinking that we would feel similar. The only warning they gave us was about water. They said water was almost impossible to find once you were up and so to take as much as possible with you. They gave us an empty orange juice bottle that we could fill with water and take as well as our platypus plus a full bottle of water they had boiled and didn’t need themselves! In the end I started the following day with 3L of water…. But it was not enough.

ImageFisherfields by Cara Morison, on Flickr

Another two guys were there and were attempting the same route as us the following day but they were planning it counter clockwise whereas we were heading clockwise. They were planning on starting at 5am so we wished them well and said we’d look forward to bumping into them the next day.

That night we pitched our tent and tried to boil as much water as possible for the next day, in the end this process took so long and we wanted to get a good night’s sleep so we found the fastest flowing part of the nearby burn and filled our containers directly from that. Afterwards we headed into our pods of our tent and tried to get some sleep.

Cara:

The lightweight sleeping bag I had brought to try and fit into my bag was not great, I was cold for most of the night and this prevented me from getting a good night’s sleep. So the next morning, I was not feeling optimal to start with but even as early as 6am, I was ready to get up and start the day. After a quick breakfast burrito, I repacked my large 70L bag (which was now very empty) and at about 7:30am we started our long walk. My boots had been beginning to fall apart for a while now and I’d forgotten prior to this. I tried to put some thick tape to hold the rubber part on the front of my toes onto the main boot but this fell off within the first 10 minutes of the walk. This didn’t affect me too much as the ground wasn’t too wet but it was a bad omen. Following the route downloaded from walk highlands (which has never steered us wrong), we walked along the side of the river and crossed it in the designated place.


ImageFisherfields by Cara Morison, on Flickr

Beinn a’Chlaidheimh: Summited @ 11:02

Having crossed the river we started ascending the first hill which is a Corbett but is one of the Fisherfield 6. The has previously been classed as a munro as was only recently demoted and so a lot of people still count this (including some of our other friends with an older book). So doing this hill was still important to us.

We had made a pact at the start of the day. We knew this was going to be a long day, the longest day any of us had done, and so we decided to do a ‘reset’ at the top of each of the 6 mountains. This could include whatever we wanted; stretching, lying down, taking our boots off, changing… whatever made us feel like we were starting the walk right there and then and made our bodies forget about all the walking we’d already done.

ImageFisherfields by Cara Morison, on Flickr

ImageFisherfields by Cara Morison, on Flickr

We were on a high when we reached the top of the first mountain; we had made good time, it hadn’t seemed too difficult and it was a nice mountain top. We had great views and the top was grassy so we were fully able to reset. We did shoulder stands and yoga and had a cereal bar to celebrate. Then on to the next one.

Sgurr Ban: Summited @ 13:00

Sam:

What’s important to remember is that until now the weather had been good. Our visibility had been excellent, which really helped motivate us. Sgurr Ban was the first test of the day. It was a boulder field from quite early on. A large amount of concentration was required to ensure you did not break an ankle, which was a big fear for us when we were this remote. The previous year we had read a news article about a young couple who spent the night deep in the Fisherfields on a hillside when one of them had suffered a broken ankle, waiting for light so that the other could go for help.


Naomi:

That kind of thought really didn’t help when I was already finding these two hills really hard. The first one was uneven and heathery on the way up and I just found it sapped my strength, and then that boulderfield just seemed to go on forever! To make things worse, the little voice in my head was telling me that if I was already struggling when everyone else seemed fine…we still had 4 hills to go, how was I ever going to get around the whole loop? I just put my head down, put one foot in front of the other, took lots of little breaks and kept plodding on.


ImageFisherfields by Cara Morison, on Flickr

ImageFisherfields by Cara Morison, on Flickr

Cara:

I got up to the top of this one first and the visibility was awful. There was no rain but I was completely blanketed in cloud. That combined with the grey boulders that surrounded me started to lower my mood. The others appeared out of the fog 5 minutes later and we attempted a reset but it was already more difficult. There were no views and you couldn’t lie down or stretch easily. We had a bite to eat and then promptly headed for the 3rd hill, fearing we’d get cold if we stayed any longer in the gloom.


Mullach Coire Mhic Fhearchair: Summited @ 14:01

Sam:

I still felt good at this point. We summited Sgurr Ban, had a reset, and cast eyes on mountain number three – it did not look terribly easy. The clouds were heavy and above us, but were beginning to close in, so we set off down the fairly forgiving path. When we hit the bottom of Mullach Coire Mhic Fhearchair, I’m sure there was a bit of swearing. There wasn’t a huge amount of climbing to do, but it was VERY steep, and very loose. I think the next two pictures show the incline and terrain fairly well…


ImageFisherfields by Cara Morison, on Flickr

ImageFisherfields by Cara Morison, on Flickr

Cara:

I call this mountain ‘Thunder Mountain’ for reasons which may be obvious but, if not, will become apparent. This mountain again was nothing like the two that had come before. This was a pointy pile of sandy gravel. The terrain had changed again and this time you slipped back a little bit for every step you took forward. It was frustrating and these obstacles were really beginning to annoy me. In theory it sounds like a fun Tough Mudder but really it was just exhausting and repetitive. Eventually we were at the top and happy as we thought we were halfway through the day. The joy quickly evaporated however in the next few minutes. I saw something in my peripheral vision suddenly that was fast but I wasn’t sure what I’d seen or if it had been real. Suddenly Sam looked at me oddly and gasped ‘You’re hair- its standing on end’… Then we heard the thunder. It shook us and seemed so loud. I realised then that what I’d seen had been a lightning strike. Poles were moved lower and attached to bags; we got low and attempted to get off this mountain as soon as possible. The thunder got louder and rain started to come down heavily.


Jen:

Luckily the descent from the summit of this munro was a steep boulder field – we were very close to the ground as we lowered ourselves down between the large stones and I felt less exposed to the elements.


Naomi

Plus nothing like a bit of fear to get those muscles going again…


ImageFisherfields by Cara Morison, on Flickr

We were now off the pointy mountain and were walking around a contour of the ridge, at least 100m from the top of it. It was at this point that we bumped into the guys who had been doing the route counter clockwise. Already 4pm we were worried that having left 2 hrs earlier than us, they were just at this point. They also seemed taken aback by the scale of the walk and the weather turning. They seemed to be experienced munro baggers but had not expected this to be as difficult. They stated that they would not do the Corbett, but instead would come down into the valley and walk back from there after they’d finished the munros. They were gone by the time we got back to camp so we’re not sure how long they took to do this. They were planning on walking back out that night.



Beinn Tarsuinn: Summited @ 15:15

Naomi:

I think all of us have blanked the summit of Beinn Tarsuinn from our memories. It was dark and wet and foggy, and we were still recovering from the lightning scare so it went by very quickly. We crossed the ‘tennis court’ in the mist, which combined with the wet made it quite a disconcerting crossing and then descended onto the bealach between Beinn Tarsuinn and a’Mhaighdean. By now, we were approaching the midpoint, and I was starting to feel significantly more cheerful. This was the moment when my 3L platypus ran dry – not even halfway round.


Cara:

This munro was long and we plodded up it. You could never see the top; it just kept going and going and going. Firstly we came off the contour and onto the bealach which was a large plain of peat hags. It took a while to get over this and we took a break while some of those that were running low on water went to try and find some. It was somewhere near here that the guys from the night before had recommended. Unfortunately they couldn’t find any and we decided to continue. We shared out the water we had and started to climb the second to last munro. My mood by this point was getting quite low. I knew there was no option but to continue as we were now as remote as you could get but mustering the energy to go on was difficult.


A’Mhaighdean: Summited @ 18:15

Sam:

I had been excited for this munro for EVER. Actually, let me correct myself. I’d been excited for the views from this munro for EVER. After hours of walking in the heavy rain, pretty saturated at this point, I was so, so worried that all of this walking had been for nothing. We were not about to get arguably one of the best views in Scotland. The grassy slope was relentless. I had no water, and was pretty fed up. We spotted a herd of deer run off and I wished I had the energy they had. But despite the doom and gloom…I couldn’t help but notice…the clag had started to lift…maybe, just maybe…we were going to get that view?



Wow. My breath was taken away. We were now at the most remote square on the OS map. Furthest away from camp that we had been all day, and it was 18:15. We had no water and no energy. But it was just beautiful, serene.

ImageFisherfields by Cara Morison, on Flickr


We couldn’t rest for long, as the last munro awaited us.


Sam:

We started to descend hill number 5, feeling quite optimistic as we’d read on all of the reviews that the next climb was really short. However, what they failed to mention was how technically challenging it was, when you’d already spent the best part of 12 hours walking. It looked simply impossible.



Cara:

This is where I slightly (completely) lost my cool. I suddenly saw the final climb of the day and, despite not being a great deal of ascent, it did not look easy.

It looked to be a vertical climb. I enjoy scrambling and I enjoy climbing but I still get scared of the heights. Normally, I would have gritted my teeth and got on with this without saying anything further but this time was different. I was exhausted, my muscles had lost their strength and were shaking, we were low on water, my bag (although almost empty) was huge and prevented some movement and reduced my visibility. This seemed more dangerous that it normally would have been. I shouted “Who put that mountain there?! “and most likely a few expletives. I was annoyed, there had been nothing about how technical this last munro was going to be on any of the reviews I’d read. I was indignant that the research I’d done hadn’t prepared me for this. I was angry and taking it out on the reviewers on the internet while ‘the lassies’ just listened (and tried to suppress laughter) to my rants.


We started climbing and tried to find the best route up. We climbed quickly; keen to get this over with as fast as possible. There was a bit of a path, but it would get lost among the stones and we’d scramble up hoping to find it again. There were sections where you had to stretch (painful!) and pull yourself (exhausting). There was at least one section of bum-shuffling along a ledge.

And then we were at the top! We had completed all 6 hills and all 5 munros.


Naomi:

All six hills done at last! And a little way down we found a stream where we could get fresh water. At this point, my mood was excellent: I can always deal with a walk out, especially when it’s not too steep, plus I had bounced back from my earlier mood ages ago and was ready to take on the world.



Sam:

Yes! I think Naomi and I chatted away the whole way back down – I’m pretty sure we could hear the grumbles of the other lassies not too far behind us mind you…


Jen:

I had enjoyed the ascent of Ruadh-stac Mor as a scramble is better to me than a long sloping slog. I was in a good mood at the top but wary that we’d been out for about 12 hours at this point; I have an annoying problem in that I have incredibly flat feet which has resulted in the muscles in my feet not being very strong. This is generally fine for ascending as that has little impact on the legs but the high impact on my feet of already accomplishing five descents of over 1000m had left them in pain: in particular, my arches were screaming against the insoles that I wore. I had to stop to take them out of my boots as we began the descent but this only alleviated the pain very slightly. Looking back on it, it may have helped to use walking poles at this point! I have never felt comfortable with them though and after being out for so long I was keen to just push onwards. The descent took approximately 3 and half hours. We reached a water refill point – a running stream – around the 13 hour mark which my fellow lassies took full advantage of (I was feeling too sorry for myself to take one step more than required to get me to my sleeping bag, so had to rely on the Naomi’s kindness to get a water top-up at the end of the day). There was a good path for most of the way down and the visibility was good, meaning little navigation skills were required. The two river crossings were tackled: the first one only Naomi took boots off the cross but the second river crossing was deeper. Reluctantly I took my boots off and used the pair of crocs I’d bought the year before for this task. The last river crossing was right by the bothy so we could just walk the rest of the way in our crocs. Once back at the tent we quickly got changed and into our sleeping bags. We had all brought boil-in-a-bag dinners but they were left untouched as no one could be bothered getting the stove out and waiting for the water to boil. This is where the Pringles came into their element! Luckily the midges were all in hiding and we could pass the can around easily between the two pods in our tent. Once all tucked up I could begin think about what we had just done; surviving the thunder and lightning, gritting our teeth and getting on with the ascents and descents, and managing to get me and my poor feet back to the tent. Fisherfield Six accomplished.



The next morning we awoke to awful midgies. We hid in the bothy and ate some breakfast, and made some coffee. We took turns to run out and dismantle the tent, and eventually packed up and retraced our steps back over towards the car. It was hard, and long, and our feet ached more than ever. We couldn’t stop for long as the midgies were out in force.

We had made it, dazed and overwhelmed by what we had achieved, we made our way for a quick lunch slightly hysterical. The walk had a huge impact on all of us and made us realise what we could achieve together. We had conquered the Fisherfields.
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Re: The Wild Lassies Take on the Fisherfields- an Epic Chall

Postby Sgurr » Mon Sep 02, 2019 10:14 am

What a great effort. I am full of congratulations to anyone who manages it in a single day....specially with the boot and feet issues.

Like you, we retreated the first year...it didn't seem right to attempt in the rain, and retreated the second and third years. I think it was the fourth that our friends said "It's Scotland, we're NEVER going to get 4 good days running and we went in ...and it rained on day 1 when we did 3 hills and 2 friends who weren't Munro baggers did just one when the rain had eased and the other came with us. He was so knackered he spent the next in his tent while we did the other two with the other two. (We had done the Corbett by itself when it was still a Munro). Never really got a good view from A'Mhaighdean, so had to go back this year.


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Re: The Wild Lassies Take on the Fisherfields- an Epic Chall

Postby rockhopper » Mon Sep 02, 2019 12:49 pm

A very entertaining read - brightened up my lunchtime. Well done all. Thanks :)
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Re: The Wild Lassies Take on the Fisherfields- an Epic Chall

Postby mrssanta » Mon Sep 02, 2019 7:08 pm

that was a really good report very honest and an enjoyable read., So glad you got the view from A'Mhaighdean
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Re: The Wild Lassies Take on the Fisherfields- an Epic Chall

Postby Petr Dakota » Mon Sep 02, 2019 7:43 pm

This is really great report and great effort as well ! :clap: :clap: :clap:
I love it as a whole story and also the idea of contributions ( cololoured descriptions ) of each of you :thumbup:
Really great adventure, something what will stay in your memories for the rest of your life, especially when shared together as a friends.......WELL DONE ! ! ! :clap: :thumbup: :clap:
Good effort and looks like you enjoyed a lot of fun together as well :D :clap: :wink: :D :clap: :clap: :clap:
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Re: The Wild Lassies Take on the Fisherfields- an Epic Chall

Postby thewildlassielife » Thu Sep 05, 2019 3:10 pm

Sgurr wrote:What a great effort. I am full of congratulations to anyone who manages it in a single day....specially with the boot and feet issues.

Like you, we retreated the first year...it didn't seem right to attempt in the rain, and retreated the second and third years. I think it was the fourth that our friends said "It's Scotland, we're NEVER going to get 4 good days running and we went in ...and it rained on day 1 when we did 3 hills and 2 friends who weren't Munro baggers did just one when the rain had eased and the other came with us. He was so knackered he spent the next in his tent while we did the other two with the other two. (We had done the Corbett by itself when it was still a Munro). Never really got a good view from A'Mhaighdean, so had to go back this year.



Great effort! The view from A'Mhaighdean really is superb - glad you finally got it!

- Sam
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Re: The Wild Lassies Take on the Fisherfields- an Epic Chall

Postby thewildlassielife » Thu Sep 05, 2019 3:11 pm

rockhopper wrote:A very entertaining read - brightened up my lunchtime. Well done all. Thanks :)


We are very glad. At the time it wasn't terribly entertaining, but we (almost) laugh now!
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Re: The Wild Lassies Take on the Fisherfields- an Epic Chall

Postby thewildlassielife » Thu Sep 05, 2019 3:12 pm

mrssanta wrote:that was a really good report very honest and an enjoyable read., So glad you got the view from A'Mhaighdean


One key thing we want to achieve is honesty! We certainly are not athletes, so want to report in a way that like minded people can appreciate!
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Re: The Wild Lassies Take on the Fisherfields- an Epic Chall

Postby thewildlassielife » Thu Sep 05, 2019 3:14 pm

Petr Dakota wrote:This is really great report and great effort as well ! :clap: :clap: :clap:
I love it as a whole story and also the idea of contributions ( cololoured descriptions ) of each of you :thumbup:
Really great adventure, something what will stay in your memories for the rest of your life, especially when shared together as a friends.......WELL DONE ! ! ! :clap: :thumbup: :clap:
Good effort and looks like you enjoyed a lot of fun together as well :D :clap: :wink: :D :clap: :clap: :clap:


Thanks so much! We weren't sure how the contributions would work, but I guess we wanted to get across how different each person can feel at each moment! We all find different stuff hard...
Yeah I'm not sure we'll ever forget some of those moments!! :)
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Re: The Wild Lassies Take on the Fisherfields- an Epic Chall

Postby Coop » Fri Sep 06, 2019 9:28 am

More reports like this needed. Honest down to earth, what it was really like on the hills and how you all felt.
Well done. :clap:
Now all I need is a 3 day good weather window next may or June - not too much to ask!
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Re: The Wild Lassies Take on the Fisherfields- an Epic Chall

Postby peregrino » Fri Sep 06, 2019 10:26 am

Thank you for this great report. I can fully relate to every aspect of it. It took me three attempts to do all six: on the first, it snowed down to 700m in mid-June, on the second I got caught out by torrential rains that made it almost impossible to walk out safely (Loch Maree had gained 3ft in24 hours!), and of the third I remember both the elation and the exhaustion when I finally collapsed into my tent at Loch an Nid. I still dream of the view from A´Mhaighdean those 18 years later.
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Re: The Wild Lassies Take on the Fisherfields- an Epic Chall

Postby Grisu » Fri Sep 13, 2019 9:59 pm

What an adventurous walk and exciting report! It's great that each of you shared her own experience individually with all the different aspects and impression!
I was prepared to do the Fisherfield this year but finally decided to postpone it because mentally I did not feel up for it this year. Your report will help me to prepare myself even better for this adventure mentally and by equipment. Thanks a lot for sharing and, yes: you really deserved the prize for the courage and your honest and even humorous reflection! :clap: :clap: :clap: for sure a memory for a lifetime, I would say!
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Re: The Wild Lassies Take on the Fisherfields- an Epic Chall

Postby Silver bullet » Thu Sep 26, 2019 5:39 am

Smashing report and some great early morning reading , really enjoyed it . What a trip and glad you got the views - then came a sudden flashback :shock: on your exit from the bothy think I ran into you girls at the bottom of An Teallach which I decide against due to weather ,then walk back down to Corrie Hallie with the wild lassies :crazy:
Once again congratulations on a great trip and report :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:
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