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Holiday in Kinlochewe - wind, snow and (finally) sunshine

Holiday in Kinlochewe - wind, snow and (finally) sunshine


Postby weaselmaster » Mon Apr 01, 2019 12:18 am

Munros included on this walk: Moruisg

Corbetts included on this walk: An Ruadh-stac, Beinn Damh, Beinn Dearg (Torridon), Beinn Enaiglair, Beinn Liath Mhor a'Ghiubhais Li, Beinn Tharsuinn, Little Wyvis, Ruadh-stac Beag, Sgorr nan Lochan Uaine, Sgurr Dubh, Sgurr na Feartaig, Sgurr nan Ceannaichean

Grahams included on this walk: Meall Doire Faid

Date walked: 23/03/2019

Time taken: 61 hours

Distance: 159 km

Ascent: 11207m

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As Allison found herself with 4 days of holiday to take before the end of March, we decided to put together a little week in Kinlochewe as a base for nearby Corbetts. We had withered about which week of March to take and ended up going for the last one, so it was beady eyes trained on the weather forecast to see if we’d made the best decision. Instead of camping, we’d chosen a cottage (on the basis that camping for 10 days at this time of year is likely to get soggy) and had decided to return to the house we’d used 2 years previously when we were doing the Grahams. On that occasion we chose a thoroughly miserable week - would fortune favour us this time round?

Day 1 - Little Wyvis

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We set off on Thursday night as usual, we could access the cottage on Friday, so wanted to get something done on the way up. A return to Beinn Loinne was contemplated, but the forecast was poor for the west coast, so Little Wyvis was our goal. A nice drive up, we camped at Black Bridge, right where we’d be starting the route up Little Wyvis in the morning. Not a bad nights sleep, still dry when we got up. The forecast was for very strong winds and heavy rain turning to snow, but although it rained persistently after we set off, the winds were lighter than we’d feared - last time on Little Wyvis we had to do an amusing crab walk to reach the summit. We chose the same route, up the zigzag track. On the way we passed a recumbent stag with more points on his antlers than I’ve seen before - he seemed to be shut in a small enclosure but had disappeared by the time we returned. The summit was duly reached and we continued on to the Simm of Tom Mheadhoin, a lone dotterel piping me on my way to the top. We followed the fence line down the back of the hill and regained a track which joined with our outward route. Back at the car just after 11, with some unexpected sunshine.

ImageP3220002 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3220003 by Al, on Flickr

Wyvis from Little Wyvis
ImageP3220006 by Al, on Flickr

Little Wyvis
ImageP3220009 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3220011 by Al, on Flickr



We had an early lunch and I contemplated driving up the A835 to add Beinn Liath Mhor a Ghuibhais Li, given that I’ve fallen behind in my Corbett target. Allison didn’t seem amazingly keen, and I decided against it when I had a look at the map and discovered there were several Simms around the Corbett that would need done too. So we drove to Kinlochewe, as the heavens opened. Made the right choice. Spend the remainder of the day, after unpacking, relaxing in the warmth and comfort

Day 2 - Sgurr Dubh & Sgorr nan Lochan Uaine

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Saturday’s forecast was for strong winds and showers, but a reasonable looking day. Decided to climb the two Corbetts across the road from Liathach; Sgurr Dubh and Sgorr nan Lochan Uaine. I remembered these hills as being pretty gruelling, especially the descent from Sgurr Dubh. To make matters more interesting I’d added in a couple of Simms. We parked at the Beinn Eighe car park, getting a visit from Spikey as soon as we’d stopped the car. He looks to have get through the winter fairly well, although he’s lost more bits from his antlers. He graciously accepted a date and nut bar then hung around hoping for more. We set off along to the Ling hut and up the track as far a the cairn, before setting off up the hillside for Sgorr nan Lochan Uaine. There had been a coating of new snow overnight, but not much residue on our hills. We reached Lochan Uaine and had a look at the steep climb to the top. Allison chose to go up the southern slope, scree lined as it was, in the hope that the wind might be less. Quite an enjoyable wee scramble up, and a fabulous vista awaiting us at the summit. Since we had no view last time, this was welcome.

Our old friend Pointy at the Beinn Eighe car park
ImageP3230013 by Al, on Flickr

Sgorr nan Lochan Uaine
ImageP3230016 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3230017 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3230018 by Al, on Flickr

Beinn Liath Mhor
ImageP3230020 by Al, on Flickr

Route up our hill
ImageP3230021 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3230023 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3230024 by Al, on Flickr

Summit pano
ImageP3230025 by Al, on Flickr

We were going out to the Simm of Beinn Liath Beag, lying parallel to its bigger brother. An easy descent off the eastern nose of the hill then. Walk over rocky terrain brought us to the top. More fine views. Our next target was the 601m Simm on the way to Sgurr Dubh, just managing to sneak into the Simm category by one metre. On the way, a snow bunny emerged from its hides hole just beneath my feet and lolloped just a few feet away where it sat, facing the opposite way from me. Usually these creatures are off like a bullet when you disturb them: maybe it was thinking if I don’t look at the human he won’t see me. Or maybe we were just emitting such pacific vegan vibes that the beast didn’t feel threatened. We got to the Simm top, then onward to Sgurr Dubh - several streams to cross, each having eroded a deep gully in the Torridian sandstone. There’s a stalkers path that climbs up from Loch Clair in the east, although it looks like to would be a fairly long walk in to access this. A fair bit of height to regain to get back to the path up Sgurr Dubh. We were both quite tired - battling the wind and the rocky ground underfoot having taken its toll. Sgurr Dubh is a mean wee hill, some rocky/ scree scrambles then a boulder field to navigate to reach the summit.

Beinn Liath Beag
ImageP3230026 by Al, on Flickr

Sgurr Dubh from Beinn Liath Beag
ImageP3230029 by Al, on Flickr

"If I don't look round, they're not there"
ImageP3230030 by Al, on Flickr

Sgurr Dubh
ImageP3230031 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3230034 by Al, on Flickr

Sgurr Dubh summit
ImageP3230037 by Al, on Flickr

We descended by the same route to the lochan then set off on the craggy descent, following the WH route closely to avoid unpleasant surprises. Even so, it’s an enervating return route and we ere both glad to reach the track and return to the car. But a fine couple of hills- glad we did them justice this time round, they’re too good to do on a claggy day.

Double rainbow
ImageP3230040 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3230041 by Al, on Flickr

Day 3 - Beinn Liath Mhor a'Ghuibhais Li

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Forecast for Sunday was not good - winds to 60mph and snow. Had considered Ruadh Stac Beag, but this seemed a little unwise when we looked out the window and saw Ruadh Stac Mhor...maybe something more cuddly today? None of the hills on my list fitted that description, so I cast the net wider, Beinn Liath Mhor a’Ghuibhais Li was fairly nearby and wouldn’t be hazardous, we could tag on a couple of Simms. So we drove up by Loch Glascarnoch in ferocious winds, pelting rain interspersed with sunshine. We took the usual route up Meall Daimh then headed up the steep heather covered slope of Li. Snow was lying from 600m. We reached the summit plateau, which afforded good, if brief glimpses of the Fannaichs before a squall came in and whitened everything. We made for the windshelter but unfortunately it was full of snow, so we sat on the leeward side and attempted to have lunch, while we were steadily encased in white.

Sunny one minute...
ImageP3240042 by Al, on Flickr

Beinn Liath Mhor a'Ghuibhais Li
ImageP3240043 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3240046 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3240047 by Al, on Flickr

Fannaichs
ImageP3240048 by Al, on Flickr

Then the sun came out and we could see our options- over to the NE was the pretty hill of Beinn Dearg. We made for that, along the surprisingly long back of Li, dropping to a bealach and heading up onto Beinn Dearg. The going was easy becoming stonier at the top of Dearg. The wind rose as we neared the summit, making walking appear a competition sport, I’m sure I was walking at an angle of 45 degrees. The wind remained fierce on the way back to the bealach, accompanied by stinging hailstones. From there we headed to Meall na Speirieg before a long descent contouring Li’s NE shoulder and some plantation fencing before the road was finally reached. We were buffeted and battered after that experience, but at least still in one piece :wink:

Beinn Dearg
ImageP3240050 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3240052 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3240053 by Al, on Flickr

Beinn Liath Mhor etc from Speirieg
ImageP3240055 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3240057 by Al, on Flickr

Day 4 - Sgurr na Feartaig & Beinn Tharsuinn
Pretty much WH route with Simm tagged on

Monday promised to be a dry day, and perhaps the best of the week. The longest walk I had planned was the Corbetts of Sgurr na Feartaig and Beinn Tharsuinn, accessed from Craig. There were a cluster of Simms around Feartaig, but sadly 3 of them would need to wait for another occasion. The route we used was the WH route, with a couple of minor amendments. Arrived at the parking spot for 9 and prepared to set off. The big decision today was whether to ditch the winter boots - a lot of the route was on track and neither of us fancied the foot torture that would ensue from 25k on track...but there would be a potentially dicey descent from Feartaig to Bealach Bernais to consider. Foot kindness prevailed and we went light of foot. Cascades of birdsong spilled from the pines as we left the car and walked along the track. Some forest/quarry work is going on at present, lots of big machinery to pass by.

We turned the corner and descended past the Great Wall of Creag an Ardaich and headed for the track up Feartaig. We crossed at the little dam: Allison shouted there was a bridge but I thought she meant way down the glen; no, actually right beside the dam. Anyway I’d already crossed and it was alright (provided the flow’s not too intense). The stalkers path up Feartaig is excellent and delivered us all the way to the summit, albeit we got off to claim the 819m simm nearby. Weather was quite feisty at the cairn and we decided to get off the hill before stopping for lunch. We followed the WH route and found, to my surprise, a path descending the hill, avoiding the main crags. Fortunately the snow wasn’t problematic apart from one small steep section, so boot choice had been alright thus far. Allison, some way behind me, suddenly yelped - she'd been whacked across the back of the legs by some unseen assailant - presumably one of the gremlins that lives on this hill.

Crossing by the dam - yes, there is a bridge...
ImageP3250059 by Al, on Flickr

Feartaig
ImageP3250060 by Al, on Flickr

The south Torridon hills
ImageP3250061 by Al, on Flickr

Feartaig from the Simm summit
ImageP3250062 by Al, on Flickr

Feartaig summit - my 100th Corbett this round
ImageP3250064 by Al, on Flickr

Her 65th
ImageP3250066 by Al, on Flickr

Bealach Bernais
ImageP3250067 by Al, on Flickr

Steep bit of the descent
ImageP3250068 by Al, on Flickr

You can (maybe) see the descent path in the snow
ImageP3250069 by Al, on Flickr

One of the hill imps (not seen by us)
Imagegollum by Al, on Flickr

We paused on the lower section of this path for lunch, whilst a Peregrine fluttered by overhead, it’s striped underbelly creamy blue against the pale sky. On wards to Bealach Bernais and a steep snowy section up onto Tharsuinn. Bit unpleasant as the snow was soft and melty and we had chosen poles rather than get our axes out. Once on the plateau there were various ups and downs to encounter before the summit was reached. From here we had the choice of heading out to the SW top, another Simm - although this was over a kilometre away and involved 160m loss of height. It was 2.10pm, adequate time, so we headed out. Views were curtailed by clag, though sometimes Cheesecake looked into view. Last time we’d been here we went on to climb Cheesecake and Lurg Mhor, plus we had big packs: today was a skoosh in comparison.

Start of the climb up Tharsuinn
ImageP3250070 by Al, on Flickr

Sgurr Choinnich
ImageP3250072 by Al, on Flickr

Summit Tharsuinn
ImageP3250075 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3250076 by Al, on Flickr

Off to the Simm now
ImageP3250077 by Al, on Flickr

Pretty lochan
ImageP3250078 by Al, on Flickr

On the return I considered using a snowy shelf that missed out Tharsuinn’s summit, but in the end we decided to play safe and follow our footsteps. We did use axes for the sloping section, which had melted further in the time we’d been away. From the Beal ah it was simply a matter of following the track back out. The last 500m or so before crossing the Allt Leathad an Tobair have been upgraded to wider high quality track. Quite odd, given that the remainder of the track to Bealach Bernais is deteriorating. And one might have expected them to have put a new footbridge in, but no, still the old pair of wires. Well it’s a bit of fun. We continued the long road back to the car, passing through a large herd of deer including some many-pointed antler stags. Back for 6pm and home for a well earned tea.

Tharsuinn from the Simm
ImageP3250080 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3250081 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3250082 by Al, on Flickr

Day 5 - Ruadh Stac Beag
WH route

Tuesday was not one of the better days, weather wise. We’d had an email from Paul Tattersall, who lives up near Gairloch, asking how we were doing on the Monday- a curious coincidence, so we’d arranged to meet up with him for a coffee mid-afternoon. That meant an early start for whatever hill we chose. Ruadh Stac Beag was chosen, mostly track and not too far, plus on the right side of the road for going to Gairloch. We arrived at the Beinn Eighe visitor centre at 7.45 and headed off into mist and drizzle. Not really he best day for a fine mountain, especially the course it shares with Beinn Eighe, but we’d had good conditions last time round and it seemed that the remainder of our week would be much the same anyway. We got a little lost coming off the track when heading for the river, but picked up a faint path in due course, and we knew we were following the course of the river anyway. Some sheets of sugary snow to negotiate and the wind started to hit us as we climbed. Once we’d crossed the river and started up the boulder field towards the summit the wind was challenging with gusts blasting rain into faces, down necks and saturating gloves (Allison was on her 3rd pair by the descent). Once we’d climbed to the top of the screen there was half a km of boulders and clag to manage before the cairn was reached.

No hanging about marvelling at the views today, just try and find our way back down. Fortunately no snow on the steep section and what there was on the approach was rapidly melting. We made it back to the car by 2, plenty time to head to Gairloch and a wide ranging chat with the always interesting Tattersall.

Mhor and Beag
ImageP3260083 by Al, on Flickr

Shelter
ImageP3260084 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3260085 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3260088 by Al, on Flickr

No summit views today
ImageP3260089 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3260090 by Al, on Flickr


Day 6 - Beinn Damh

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For Wednesday I thought we’d do Beinn Damh. An attempt had been made last December but abandoned due to storm force winds and ice. Today’s forecast was for most and rain, with winds in the 30 mph zone. After yesterday’s early rise we were more indulgent today, rising late and having a cooked breakfast. Parked at the Torridon in. Which was starting to get itself ready for the coming holiday season. Straight forward ascent using the track, mist encountered at around 500m so no good views today. A thin rim of snow lining the coire was all that remained of winter’s incursion. The summit cairn looked like it had been recently dismantled. Tracking back to the bealach, we lunched then continued on to the two northern Simms, which must be worth a visit on a clear day. There’s a motorway like path up to the first summit, not something found on many Simms. A trig point made of the surrounding sandstone graces the second peak. Back down at the car before 3.30, the promised rain having been conspicuous by its absence for a change. A relaxing afternoon at the cottage followed, with time for reading and some meditation.

ImageP3270091 by Al, on Flickr

Summit Damh
ImageP3270092 by Al, on Flickr

Sgurr na Bana-Mhoraine
ImageP3270094 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3270095 by Al, on Flickr

Day 7 - An Raudh Stac
WH route

Oh a windy day was Thursday, the forecast predicted similar wind speeds to the day before, but they were much stronger. Still from the south west, so I hoped we’d be able to manage An Ruadh Stac, as we should be ascending in the wind-shadow. We took the WH route in from Coulags, noting that it helpfully included the Simm of Meall nan Ceapairean. Walking up as far as the Botha was fine, but we could feel the wind as we started up the grassy slopes to Ceapairean and by the time we reached the summit the wind was trying to tear us our of our skins. Part of the problem was that it was funnelling along the flank of An Ruadh Stac. We descended to the Beal ah and recruited a large boulder to shield us while we had lunch. The wind roared and howled across the face of Mail Chinn Dearg, speeding tatters of cloud across the summit. Neither of us were very optimistic about getting our hill, as we had over 300m of height to gain into the teeth of the wind.

ImageP3280096 by Al, on Flickr

Top of Ceapraichean
ImageP3280097 by Al, on Flickr

An Ruadh Stac
ImageP3280098 by Al, on Flickr

Maol Chinn Dearg
ImageP3280099 by Al, on Flickr

We set off, somewhat pensively but I had guessed right and the ascent was largely out of the wind. I’d forgotten what a joy this hill is to climb, the first 100m being easy scrambling on quartzite slabs, then onto boulders for the remainder of the ascent. The rocks were a bit greasy and needed some care, but it was thoroughly enjoyable to scramble up. A profusion of cairns guides the route, useful over the slabs. As we neared the summit, we were a bit more exposed to the wind, but it was entirely manageable. A smile of gratitude to have made it up. By the time we were descending a light drizzle had started, which made the slabs slippier but we took our time and returned to the bealach in good spirits. An ascent of Mail China Dearg had been considered, but as that hill was receiving the full brunt of the wind, we thought better of it and returned with our Corbett of the day quite happily.

Let the fun begin
ImageP3280100 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3280101 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3280103 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3280104 by Al, on Flickr

Day 8 - Beinn Enaiglair & Meall Doire Faid

enaiglairx.gpx Open full screen  NB: Walkhighlands is not responsible for the accuracy of gpx files in users posts



On the day that Brexit was supposed to happen the forecast was again problematic with winds of 45 mph being quoted for all the nearby tops and clag all day. Not a day for Beinn Dearg then, although as it turned out the wind was negligible. Or maybe we were just immunised from yesterday. Anyway, decided to drive up to Braemore Junction for Beinn Enaiglair, the hill of the timid birds, as being the nearest Corbett without anything ridgey. We left in rain and clag, drove through sunshine and parked in drizzle.

I reckoned we should take the track that cuts between the Corbett and it’s Graham friend, summit Enaiglair via its SE shoulder then take in the nearby Simm before heading across to do the Graham. Path was soggy underfoot til we turned off to follow the Allt a’Chumhainn. We stopped by the Big Boulder to have lunch, and were overflown by a bunch of ravens, who didn’t look timid in the least, then continued along the path to Bealach nam Buthan where we turned uphill. Steady going, over a few recalcitrant patches of snow brought us to the summit cairn. From here we took the usual ascent path down to access Bac na Faire’s 809m top. We rejoined the main track until it joined with the E-W one and headed for Loch Feith na Cleireach on our way to Meall Doire Faid. After crossing the stream we found a whole series of man made pools, interlinked in circuits. I don’t think I’ve encountered this before, not sure of the purpose, but there must have been 50 or more pools.

ImageP3290106 by Al, on Flickr

Big boulder
ImageP3290107 by Al, on Flickr

Summit Enaiglair
ImageP3290109 by Al, on Flickr

Loch Glascarnoch
ImageP3290111 by Al, on Flickr

The ascent up to Meall nan Doirechan was uneventful, watched y a small group of deer at the scarp. Then along the crest of the hill to the summit of the Graham. Last time, this was my 7th Graham and we were not used to walking on trackless terrain. Oh how things have changed :lol: We cut straight down, aiming for the car park, which we could see when the clag permitted. Quite a good day out in the end.

Meall Doire Faid
ImageP3290112 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3290115 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3290117 by Al, on Flickr


Day 9 - Sgurr nan Ceannaichean & Moruisg
WH route

We had to be out of the cottage on Saturday morning and I had hopes to do Beinn Dearg, meaning that we could head down the road a bit afterwards and do something nearer home on Sunday. Once again the weather had other plans - we woke to find Beinn Eighe covered in snow, which - coupled with forecasted winds in the 20-30mph range, made us think again. The fall back option was Moruisg with Sgurr nan Ceannaichean, taking the standard WH route from the main road. After getting the car packed, we got away before 9 and were surprised to see how much snow had come down overnight - Wyvis was back to being white, and there was snow down to around 500m all around. This was the third time we've been up Moruisg, and from a different direction each time. The path to the bridge and the railway creep was sub-aquatic and the initial stretches up the lower flanks of Moruisg not much better. I had intended to do Ceannaichean first, but wasn't paying attention to navigating and found that we were well on the way up Moruisg and well past the turn off before I noticed. Ach well...

The climb up Moruisg was easier than it looked, just a steady slog. By the time we neared the top the wind was chilling our bones and blowing hail and spindrift against us. Glad not to be up Beinn Dearg in this. We continued to the western cairn and saw the long curving ridge down to Ceannaichean below us. Ceannaichean has the unique record amongsdt Corbetts of formerly being a Munro Top. We paused for lunch at the final dip before the climb to the summit, devouring some sausage rolls I'd made the night before (complete with HP sauce). While we were munching, the first walker we'd seen on the hills all week caught up with us - a local guy from Strathpeffer out to stretch his legs.

Ceannaichean
ImageP3300120 by Al, on Flickr

Ascending Moruisg
ImageP3300121 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3300123 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3300124 by Al, on Flickr

Ceannaichean
ImageP3300126 by Al, on Flickr

We continued on to the summit, enjoying the views over to Feartaig and the sharp pointy pyramid of Bidean a'Choire Sheasgaich. We descended off Creag a'Chait and followed the Alltan na Feola back to the car - a rather nice walk apart from the general sogginess of the ground. Now what would we do...it was not even 3pm, we could drive two or three hours down the road and do something more local...but the forecast was adamant that Sunday was to be a cracker of a day, no winds and full sunshine. It would be a damn shame to leave Torridon before seeing it in its glory. However, it would mean getting back later than was ideal (one of us had work on Monday :lol: ) plus the clocks going forward removed another hour from the equation. Ach we might as well stay. So we headed back to Torridon, lodging at the campsite, which was even more waterlogged than usual - they really need to get the track for cars sorted out.

Summit Ceannaichean
ImageP3300130 by Al, on Flickr

Ridge to Moruisg
ImageP3300131 by Al, on Flickr

Pointy cheesecake
ImageP3300132 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3300134 by Al, on Flickr

Day 10 - Beinn Dearg

deargx.gpx Open full screen  NB: Walkhighlands is not responsible for the accuracy of gpx files in users posts


A couple of other tents there, a cold night, -1 in the morning with ice in the puddles. But the sun was shining, the sky was blue :clap: We got up at 6.45, which was really still 5.45, breakfasted and packed up and were on our way into Coire MhicNobaill before 8. Just a beautiful morning, birdsong, the Allt gushing beside us, Alligin to our right and Beinn Dearg coming into view before us. There was a little snow on top - we'd packed our crampons in case of hard snow or glazed rocks. I had thought we might do the circuit anticlockwise, which would mean we could do the downclimbs on the tower as upclimbs. But then I thought if they were glazed and proved difficult we'd have to abandon the summit - no way that was going to happen!

We trotted along past Alligin, Baosbheinn coming into view with just a crust of snow on its top. Allison managed to find the path up Stuc Loch na Cabhaig, which had eluded us before. We could see another walker some way behind us. This caused me some considerable concern, when several fist sized rocks were dislodged when I was scrambling up a particularly loose gully and plunged below - I was worried that I might have brained the poor guy until we saw him appear on Cabhaig when we we were at the main summit. Anyway, back to the climb - there was a thin layer of snow to be dealt with, but it didn't prove too much of an obstacle. There was one unpleasant section near the main top when Allison started to head left round a crag onto a rather exposed looking bypass path - I decided I was having none of that and took a more direct route up the rocks. The top was gained, with excellent views of all the Torridon hills, "what we've been missing all week" says Allison.

Dish of the day
ImageP3310138 by Al, on Flickr

Baosbheinn
ImageP3310139 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3310140 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3310145 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3310146 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3310147 by Al, on Flickr

Alligin
ImageP3310148 by Al, on Flickr

Nearing the top
ImageP3310150 by Al, on Flickr

Baosbheinn & Beinn an Eoin
ImageP3310151 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3310153 by Al, on Flickr

Eoin, Chearcaill & Slioch in the distance
ImageP3310152 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3310160 by Al, on Flickr

Dearg summit
ImageP3310164 by Al, on Flickr

We were doing oK for time and I don't think either of us were especially keen to reverse our route and go back down the loose scree of Cabhaig. My only concern about the downclimbs was the rather hefty rucksack I had on - I remembered one of them being quite a narrow chimney and didn't fancy getting stuck. I love the way the two towers jut in opposing directions, such a great feature of this mountain. Anyway, we descended cautiously, finding that the downclimbs were not icy or snowy and relatively straightforward, even with a larger than ideal rucksack. Onwards to the far east top - I had no route for the descent, but remembered that it took a SW line from Carn na Feola. There didn't seem to be much point going up there again just to come down, especially with a long drive ahead of us, so we took an early lunch and headed for the bealach, aiming straight down. Although there were no crags shown in this area on the map, there were plenty, and we ended up taking a steep line down the route of a small stream, mainly because I could see all the way to the bottom and we were not going to encounter a band of crags lower down that prevented our escape.

ImageP3310165 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3310169 by Al, on Flickr

The towers
ImageP3310170 by Al, on Flickr

The downclimbs
ImageP3310174 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3310176 by Al, on Flickr

Our descent
ImageP3310182 by Al, on Flickr

Back on the flatter ground we followed a deer track for a bit then joined the main path by the Abhiann Coire MhicNobaill. We made good progress and were back at the car for just after 2pm. It had been an even better day than the forecast had predicted and indeed it remained sunny all the way down the road. So the end of a good week - albeit the weather could have been more clement - with 12 Corbetts, a Munro & Graham and 12 new Simms.

A great hill
ImageP3310185 by Al, on Flickr

ImageP3310187 by Al, on Flickr
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weaselmaster
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Re: Holiday in Kinlochewe - wind, snow and (finally) sunshin

Postby stirlingdavo » Mon Apr 01, 2019 1:11 am

weaselmaster wrote:After crossing the stream we found a whole series of man made pools, interlinked in circuits. I don’t think I’ve encountered this before, not sure of the purpose, but there must have been 50 or more pools.


This was probably a peatland restoration project - they tend to result in lots of little pools in linear patterns. There's quite a lot of projects been going on in the highlands over the last few years.

Cheers David
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Re: Holiday in Kinlochewe - wind, snow and (finally) sunshin

Postby weaselmaster » Mon Apr 01, 2019 8:55 am

stirlingdavo wrote:
weaselmaster wrote:After crossing the stream we found a whole series of man made pools, interlinked in circuits. I don’t think I’ve encountered this before, not sure of the purpose, but there must have been 50 or more pools.


This was probably a peatland restoration project - they tend to result in lots of little pools in linear patterns. There's quite a lot of projects been going on in the highlands over the last few years.

Cheers David


Thanks for clarifying that, a fair bit of work gone into it too.
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Re: Holiday in Kinlochewe - wind, snow and (finally) sunshin

Postby PeteR » Mon Apr 01, 2019 12:19 pm

Interesting and very timely as a couple of these are down on my wish list for the WH Spring Meet at the weekend.

To be fair, each of those walks looked excellent, with some descent weather thrown in too, y the looks of it.
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Re: Holiday in Kinlochewe - wind, snow and (finally) sunshin

Postby scoob999 » Mon Apr 01, 2019 7:23 pm

:shock: :shock: :shock: Surprised you had time to do hills, looks like you've been very busy growing a beard :clap: :clap: :clap:
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Re: Holiday in Kinlochewe - wind, snow and (finally) sunshin

Postby weaselmaster » Mon Apr 01, 2019 7:43 pm

PeteR wrote:Interesting and very timely as a couple of these are down on my wish list for the WH Spring Meet at the weekend.

To be fair, each of those walks looked excellent, with some descent weather thrown in too, y the looks of it.


Which ones, Pete?
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Re: Holiday in Kinlochewe - wind, snow and (finally) sunshin

Postby weaselmaster » Mon Apr 01, 2019 7:44 pm

scoob999 wrote::shock: :shock: :shock: Surprised you had time to do hills, looks like you've been very busy growing a beard :clap: :clap: :clap:


Nah - you just leave a saucer of water out for it at night - happens naturally :wink:
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Re: Holiday in Kinlochewe - wind, snow and (finally) sunshin

Postby gammy leg walker » Mon Apr 01, 2019 9:28 pm

That's a tidy sum of hills done during your holidays, always look forward to reading your TRs.

I'm meeting up with Paul Tattersall at the end of May for 2 days guiding on Skye
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Re: Holiday in Kinlochewe - wind, snow and (finally) sunshin

Postby weaselmaster » Mon Apr 01, 2019 10:35 pm

gammy leg walker wrote:That's a tidy sum of hills done during your holidays, always look forward to reading your TRs.

I'm meeting up with Paul Tattersall at the end of May for 2 days guiding on Skye


You'll have a great time with him, top man :D
What hills are you planning on?
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Re: Holiday in Kinlochewe - wind, snow and (finally) sunshin

Postby Alteknacker » Tue Apr 02, 2019 10:57 am

A great read, there. :clap: :clap:

I think I'd have been a bit disappointed though, had I not got that superb last day. Torridon is just wonderful when it's like that!
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Re: Holiday in Kinlochewe - wind, snow and (finally) sunshin

Postby PeteR » Tue Apr 02, 2019 12:20 pm

weaselmaster wrote:
PeteR wrote:Interesting and very timely as a couple of these are down on my wish list for the WH Spring Meet at the weekend.

To be fair, each of those walks looked excellent, with some descent weather thrown in too, y the looks of it.


Which ones, Pete?


The plan Al........assuming I'm up and out the house at some stupid hour, is Sgurr na Feartaig and Beinn Tharsuinn. Otherwise it might just be Sgurr nan Ceannaichean as a single hill if I'm later parking up than I'd like.
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Re: Holiday in Kinlochewe - wind, snow and (finally) sunshin

Postby gammy leg walker » Tue Apr 02, 2019 2:02 pm

weaselmaster wrote:
gammy leg walker wrote:That's a tidy sum of hills done during your holidays, always look forward to reading your TRs.

I'm meeting up with Paul Tattersall at the end of May for 2 days guiding on Skye


You'll have a great time with him, top man :D
What hills are you planning on?


Sgurr nan Eag...Sgurr Dubh Mor....Sgurr Alasdair one day

Sgurr nan Gilliean...Am Bastier.....Bruach na Frithe the second day
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Re: Holiday in Kinlochewe - wind, snow and (finally) sunshin

Postby weaselmaster » Tue Apr 02, 2019 9:05 pm

gammy leg walker wrote:
Sgurr nan Eag...Sgurr Dubh Mor....Sgurr Alasdair one day

Sgurr nan Gilliean...Am Bastier.....Bruach na Frithe the second day


Ah great stuff. That’s a nice first day, good luck with the weather :D
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Re: Holiday in Kinlochewe - wind, snow and (finally) sunshin

Postby weaselmaster » Tue Apr 02, 2019 9:08 pm

PeteR wrote:
The plan Al........assuming I'm up and out the house at some stupid hour, is Sgurr na Feartaig and Beinn Tharsuinn. Otherwise it might just be Sgurr nan Ceannaichean as a single hill if I'm later parking up than I'd like.


Ah, yeah Feartaig & Tharsuinn a reasonable day, probably 8 hours or so, if you don’t do the Simms :wink: Just need to watch that descent off Feartaig if there is a good deal more snow on the hill, which it looks like there might be...
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