walkhighlands

A Cloud Inversion with a difference

Hewitts: Wild Boar Fell

Date walked: 12/07/2017

Time taken: 4 hours

Distance: 13km

Ascent: 621m

As a stunning day and a reasonable amount of time for once fell on my day off work I decided to head for the Dales and was all set to walk up Calf Top from Barbon. A few unforeseen incidents later saw me setting off later than hoped meaning that Calf Top would have to be a bit rushed. With this peculating in my mind as Hughie and I zoomed across the A66 towards the waiting hills I made an executive decision and decided to bin off Calf Top and leave it for another day and head for an old favorite Wild Boar Fell.
Having climbed this fine fell from the magnificent Mallerstang valley previously I decided to ascend from the Ravenstonedale side this time so left the A683 Sedburgh road for the old road through the dale. I pottered along till I was somewhere around the region of Fell End before parking up on a stunning morning of wall to wall sunshine.

Having read the title you'll be wondering just where the cloud inversion comes into things? Well the clouds beneath Wild Boar Fell where now right in front of me in the shape of the wonderfully named Fell End and Stennerskeugh Clouds. I always thought this was a superb name for limestone pavements and I set off to explore these up an old track that was presumably from a time when the limestone was "harvested" for mortar.

ImageMeadows in Ravenstonedale by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageAcross to the Howgills by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageOld Lime Kiln? by Anthony Young, on Flickr

Image
Heading up the Old Track by Anthony Young, on Flickr

I made my way up through the pavements, marvelling at the superb scenery allround, towards the "summit" of Fell End Clouds. This isn't really a summit but is part of a low ridge which runs across the top of the pavements. The walking is beautiful and I could have spent quite a while wandering in this superb corner of the world.

ImageFell End Clouds Panorama by Anthony Young, on Flickr (click on pic for bigger version)

ImageOld Cairn by Anthony Young, on Flickr

Image
Limestone pavement by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageHeading up the mini ridge of Fell End Clouds by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageLooking down to the cairns by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageFell End Clouds Summit by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageLooking back towards the Howgills by Anthony Young, on Flickr

Image
On the way to Stennerskeugh Clouds by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageStennerskeugh Clouds Summit by Anthony Young, on Flickr

Having traversed across the mini ridge I set off across open fellside to link up with the Pennine bridleway up towards another superbly named spot, High Dolphinsty. Once on the Bridleway the huge number of trees that are getting planted around this area are there to be seen. It's wonderful to think this area will be largely re-forested with native species in a few years time, who knows perhaps they'll release some wild boar as well. I'm sure all the trees will look great once they mature but what does look great now is the sight of the Mallerstang valley laid out before you as you reach the pass.

ImageOn the Pennine Bridleway by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageLooking down Scandal by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageHigh Dolphinsty by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageNorth West from High Dolphinsty by Anthony Young, on Flickr

I'd started to see other walkers by now following the seclusion of the clouds as I made my way up towards the seemingly dramatic peak of The Nab. This isn't really a dramatic peak, just the termination of the edge but it does make a very fine view point to look up, down and across the valley. I continued along the edge ignoring the summit for the time being and decided, as I saw a group of walkers heading to the shelter just ahead on the edge, to find a nice patch of grass to sit and have a bit too eat. I sat watching the clouds make patterns on the fells alone with my own thoughts feeling like there was nowhere else in the world I'd rather be at this moment. There is just something about the landscapes of the North West Dales that really just does it for me.

ImageAcross Mallerstang to High Seat by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageThe Nab by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageBog and Sky by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageThe Nab Summit by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageHughie by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageBlackbed Scar by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageLooking down to Mallerstang by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageYoadcomb Scar with Ingleborough and Wernside by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageLooking back towards High Seat by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageHughie exploring by Anthony Young, on Flickr

Nothing lasts forever so I roused myself to continue along the edge to visit the Stone Men who stand so prominently above the valley. The nine standards my be more famous but these cairns still provide an impressive and baffling sight. Who built them and why? along with the name of Mallerstang it'self it's lost to history. I suppose this, along with so many other fine names for places in these parts just adds to the romance and mystery of the place.

ImageStone Men on Wild Boar Fell by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageYorkshire three Peaks on the horizon by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageAnother of the Stone Men by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageSunlight and shadows. by Anthony Young, on Flickr

By now I had formulated a plan to follow the edge of Wild Boar Fell's plateau all the way back round to the summit, fine in theory but as the edge loses definition around the southern tip not quite as rewarding as hoped. Soon enough however I was on the western edge enjoying great views to the Howgills and beyond as I made the very steady climb up to the summit.

ImageHughie looking towards the Howgills by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageTowards the North Pennines by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageWild Boar Fell Summit by Anthony Young, on Flickr

Summit visited I set off towards Sand Tarn which soon came into view. I picked my way down the fellside before finding a suitable place to sit and enjoy this peaceful spot as I consumed the remainder of my rations. I didn't have the place to myself which was a shame if I'm being selfish, but it's still a very nice tarn nestled just below the summit. In fact I'd say it's probably my favorite tarn I've been to in the Dales.

ImageSand Tarn with the Howgills behind by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageSand Tarn by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageCautley Crag and Spout from Sand Tarn by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageDramatic Sand Tarn by Anthony Young, on Flickr

The way down was straightforward and relatively dry as I followed Forcepot Sike and Clouds Gill down towards Fell End before picking up an old track back to the car. This was a wonderful way to spend a few hours with the ascent from this side possibly being even better than the Mallerstang side given the beautiful limestone clouds and Sand Tarn. All in all a superb day in the fells :D

ImageOld Sheep Fold at Fell End by Anthony Young, on Flickr

ImageShadowy Cautley Crag by Anthony Young, on Flickr


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Comments: 5



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johnkaysleftleg


User avatar
Location: County Durham
Occupation: General dogsbody
Interests: Walking (Who would have guessed), photography and playing Guitar.
Activity: Walker
Pub: Moulin Inn
Mountain: Blaven
Place: Isle of Skye
Gear: Boots
Member: None
Camera: Canon EOS400d
Ideal day out: Ridge walk without to much exposure.
Ambition: Too keep climbing hills

Munros: 24
Corbetts: 9
Grahams: 10
Donalds: 3
Wainwrights: 214
Hewitts: 158
Sub 2000: 7

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Statistics

2017

Trips: 14
Distance: 168.25 km
Ascent: 9549m
Munros: 1
Grahams: 1
Sub2000s: 1
Hewitts: 9
Wainwrights 19

2016

Trips: 17
Distance: 213.5 km
Ascent: 12721m
Corbetts: 2
Grahams: 1
Hewitts: 14
Wainwrights 12

2015

Trips: 19
Distance: 367.5 km
Ascent: 22089m
Munros: 2
Corbetts: 1
Hewitts: 45
Wainwrights 50

2014

Trips: 21
Distance: 424.5 km
Ascent: 27170m
Munros: 6
Grahams: 1
Sub2000s: 1
Hewitts: 44
Wainwrights 57

2013

Trips: 34
Distance: 360.25 km
Ascent: 22306m
Munros: 2
Corbetts: 3
Grahams: 3
Donalds: 2
Sub2000s: 3
Hewitts: 33
Wainwrights 54

2012

Trips: 33
Distance: 352.78 km
Ascent: 22683m
Munros: 4
Grahams: 3
Hewitts: 28
Wainwrights 34

2011

Trips: 18
Distance: 162.53 km
Ascent: 12643m
Munros: 5
Corbetts: 1
Grahams: 1
Sub2000s: 1
Hewitts: 7
Wainwrights 24

2010

Trips: 2
Distance: 8 km
Ascent: 950m
Munros: 1
Hewitts: 1
Wainwrights 1


Joined: Jan 28, 2009
Last visited: Oct 20, 2017
Total posts: 2720 | Search posts




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