walkhighlands

Scotland's Great Trails

The Ayrshire Coastal Path

Stretching for 148km from the southern to northernmost limits of the county, the Ayrshire Coastal Path sticks close to the coastline itself and for much of its length runs along sandy beaches. The two halves of the route have a contrasting character, with remoter, more rural countryside - and rougher walking - on the first half to Ayr, suceeded by the more urban and industrial landscapes of the northern half.

The route was developed by the Rotary Club of Ayr over 4 years to celebrate its centenary. Almost the entire route is blessed with superb vistas out to sea, with the great rock of Ailsa Craig and the dramatic outline of the great ridges of Arran seen across the Firth of Clyde.

Stage descriptions Length Time Done
Glenapp to Ballantrae 15km 3.5 - 4 hours
Ballantrae to Lendalfoot 10km 3.5 - 4 hours
Lendalfoot to Girvan 11km 3.5 - 4 hours
Girvan to Maidens 13.25km 3.5 - 4 hours
Maidens to Dunure 10.25km 4 - 4.5 hours
Dunure to Ayr 11.75km 4.5 - 5 hours
Ayr to Troon 15.25km 4.5 - 5 hours
Troon to Irvine 11km 3 - 3.5 hours
Irvine to Ardrossan 14.75km 4 4.5 hours
Ardrossan to Portencross 10.5km 3 -3.5 hours
Portencross to Largs Marina 11.25km 3.5 - 4 hours
Largs Marina to Skelmorlie 14km 4.5 - 5 hours

THE CHALLENGE

The route is waymarked and for much of the distance runs along sandy beaches or rocky shores, whilst other parts follow cyclepaths. The walking is generally straightforward, with just a few stages offering some harder going with muddy sections and ascents / clifftop paths. Some sections can be impassable at high tide, so timetables should be checked as mentioned in the stage descriptions.

BAGGAGE TRANSFERS AND WALKING PACKAGES

Click to find organised Ayrshire Coastal Path walking holiday packages and baggage transfer providers.

ROUTE PHOTO GALLERY

Click to open our photo gallery

ACCOMMODATION AND SERVICES ALONG THE WAY

For walkers attempting the Ayrshire Coastal Path as a continuous walk, there are plenty of options for overnight accommodation along the route.

Glenapp at the start has no facilities, but can be reached by bus along the A77. Ballantrae has a small hotel/inn and some bed and breakfast accommodation, as well as a tearoom and shop.

Lendalfoot has no facilities except for a phone box and bus stop with a service to Girvan or back to Ballantrae, so you could stay 2 nights at either of those places or double up the stage.

Girvan is a small town with a choice of accommodation, shops and eating places.

Maidens is a fishing village and has a hotel and bed and breakfast, with further accommodation in nearby Turnberry. Dunure is similary a village with an inn and guest houses.

Ayr is a large town with all services and types of accommodation available. Ayr also has a SYHA hostel.

There are also all services available in the towns of Troon, Irvine and Ardrossan.

Portencross is an attractive spot but has no services; there is accommodation available in nearby West Kilbride. Largs has a choice of hotels and guest houses.

Finally, Skelmorlie and neighbouring Wemyss Bay both offer hotel and guest house accommodation.

BOOKS AND MAPS

PUBLIC TRANSPORT

The Ayrshire Coastal Path is mostly very well served by public transport and can be walked a stage at a time.

There are buses to the start and end of each stage, apart from Portencross (bus at West Kilbride) and Largs marina (bus at Largs) - in both cases the bus stop is close to the route a short distance along the trail.

Additionally, trains serve Girvan, Ayr, Troon, Irvine, Ardrossan, West Kilbride, Largs and Wemyss Bay by the end of the trail.

Timetables for all the routes can be found on Traveline Scotland.

Users' walk reports for the Ayrshire Coastal Path

There are 54 Walkhighlanders who have completed the Ayrshire Coastal Path. To record if you have completed the route, you must register and be logged in. Our users have contributed 3 public walk reports for the route. These are ordered below with the most popular ones first.

Title AuthorDate walked Likes
  14/02/2011  5
  29/01/2011  4
  17/09/2013  1

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Walking can be dangerous and is done entirely at your own risk. Information is provided free of charge; it is each walker's responsibility to check it and navigate using a map and compass.