walkhighlands

Gear Review: Trail Shoes

Outside of the snowy season, more and more walkers are opting for trailshoes over boots these days. With lower weight and increased flexibility comes more comfort… though the low rise compromises waterproofing. As usual, we’d recommend trying on in a shop rather than buying online, as fit is the most important factor with footwear. Many people find they are wearing a size too small, which can’t be fixed; if the shoes are big enough you can easily adjust with footbeds/socks/lacing. All weights are per pair; the women’s shoes were tested by Helen and the men’s by Paul, so be careful

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Posted in Footwear, Gear reviews, Magazine

Behind the headlines: Scottish Mountain Rescue

Last year saw a record number of call outs for Scotland’s mountain rescue teams. What was behind this increase – and can the teams cope? Paul Webster interviews Scottish Mountain Rescue statisticians Tom Adams and Andy Morgan to find out the truths behind the heated posts and discussions we often see on social media. PAUL: Can you tell us a bit about yourselves? TOM: I’m Tom Adams, SMR statistician. I have been a member of Oban Mountain Rescue Team for around 9 years. I am a keen walker, scrambler and mountain biker myself. I used to climb a lot but

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Posted in Features, Magazine

I’ve struck oil in the hills!

Everyone has their favourite Scottish animal, the one they’re always on the lookout for, the one that stops them in their tracks. But while I love a white-tailed eagle or a red squirrel as much as the next person, my favourite Scottish animal isn’t big, fluffy or familiar. It’s small, it’s uncommon and it’s downright weird. Erm…..it’s a beetle. Yes, I can hear your inward groans, but bear with me. It’s actually surprising to encounter something utterly alien. By that I mean, we’re all generally aware that insects are enormously varied in appearance but we nevertheless expect the ones we

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Posted in Features, Magazine, Nature

Culbin Sands of Time

David Lintern investigates the beaches and forests of Culbin Sands, a perfect place for family adventures with a fascinating past. Unsurprisingly perhaps, Walkhighlands spends a fair amount of time in Scotland’s high lands, but you can’t be in the mountains every day of the year, and the Highlands is about far more than hills. Our nearest coastline stretches out from Inverness along the Moray firth, somewhere my family and I are slowly learning more about. My other half loves the wide horizons and the sound of the sea, especially. There’s a quiet and curious mix of fishing villages, heavy industry,

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Posted in Features, Magazine

ScotWays calls on public for help with Dalwhinnie crossing evidence

ScotWays (The Scottish Rights of Way & Access Society) is appealing for information from people who have used the Ben Alder level crossing to access long-distance routes west of Dalwhinnie in the Highlands. This is part of continuing efforts to resolve the problems created by Network Rail’s closure of the level crossing. Previous actions have included a public petition signed by over 9000 people, meetings with Network Rail and an open letter from multiple organisations to the Transport Minister. The Ben Alder level crossing is immediately south of Dalwhinnie station in the Cairngorms National Park and is recorded as part

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Posted in Access issues, Magazine, News

Gear Review: Alpkit Ranger Ventile Jacket

Recommended Price: £349.99Weight: 720g (women’s size 10) Originally developed in the late 1930s, clothing made of Ventile is said to have saved the lives of countless RAF pilots who ditched into the sea. A very tightly woven cotton, it was created to be cool and practical when worn in the cockpit but warm and impenetrable when it came into contact with water. Later used both during the first ascent of Everest in 1953 and by Sir Ranulph Fiennes to cross the Arctic, it has continued to be championed especially by polar travellers, but largely fell out of favour as other

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Posted in Gear reviews, Jackets, Magazine

The Oa

Islay resident Katie Featherstone takes readers on a long and rugged walk to discover both the wild nature and the harsh human history of the Oa peninsula. A curiously round protrusion, the Oa forms the most southerly part of Islay. Far from the gentle hills and long sandy beaches for which the rest of the island is known, this peninsula towers above the sea with eroding, rocky cliffs, dramatic sea stacks, and hidden coves. With half the landmass run by the RSPB as a nature reserve, it’s known for its birdlife, particularly choughs, hen harriers, and nesting golden eagles. Only

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Posted in Features, Magazine

Our picks: Scotland’s most remarkable paths

The Silver Walk, Moidart Undoubtedly one of the truly special paths of the Highlands, this fascinating route cut out of the rock through picturesque scenery. The eastern end of the Silver Walk near Kinlochmoidart is currently diverted, but this isn’t the finest part in any case. The best outing is a circuit from stunning Castle Tioram, taking in a deserted hamlet, pine-fringed hill lochs and a view out to the Isles. It’s a stone-cold classic half-day walk – surely one of Scotland’s finest. Kinloch Hourn to Barrisdale Bay, Knoydart The Knoydart landscape ranks amongst Scotland’s most rugged, to the extent

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Posted in Access issues, Features, Magazine, Our picks

Hebridean Way guide launched on Walkhighlands

We’re delighted to launch our new guide to the Hebridean Way, the unique 253km walking route which begins on the island of Vatersay, and visits Barra, Eriskay, South Uist, Benbecula, Grimsay, North Uist, Berneray and Harris and Lewis, finishing in the capital of the Western Isles, Stornoway. Our full guide: https://www.walkhighlands.co.uk/outer-hebrides/hebridean-way.shtml We’ve fully detailed descriptions of the route in 12 stages in our usual style, all illustrated with photography and full Ordnance Survey mapping. If doing the route in stages, you can record your progress stage-by-stage. You can also record your own experiences of walking the route and read those

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Posted in Access issues, Magazine, News, Walkhighlands news

Exclusive endurance race accused of vandalism on Goatfell

The exclusive Highland Kings race – which charges entry fees of £15,000 per person – has been accused of vandalism after daubing yellow arrows on rocks where the route heads over Goatfell on Arran. Local mountain guide Lucy Wallace – a contributor as Walkhighlands and a member of the local mountain rescue team – raised the issue on her Facebook page: “Last night while I was having a brilliant time on Goatfell with my friends, (yet somehow leaving no trace of our presence), we saw that the mountain had been daubed in hundreds of these sprayed on yellow waymarks. I

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Posted in Magazine, Nature, News


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Walking can be dangerous and is done entirely at your own risk. Information is provided free of charge; it is each walker's responsibility to check it and navigate using a map and compass.