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Monthly Archives: April 2009

New funds and Big Cats on the Kintyre Way

The Kintyre Way, long distance walking route, is set to receive £150,000 over the next three years which will allow upgrading and ongoing publicity work to continue. The funding includes contributions from Scottish Natural Heritage, Argyll and the Islands Leader, Highlands and Islands Enterprise, Argyll and Bute Council and the East and West Kintyre Windfarm Trusts. The funds will allow more of the 88 mile route, which runs from Tarbert to Southend, to become off road. Recent improvements mean that most of the route now runs along paths and forestry tracks, however the section from Campbeltown to Machrinhanish still runs

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Posted in News

Lamb kills by Sea Eagles to be monitored

In response to crofter’s concerns that Sea Eagles are killing a large number of lambs in north west Scotland, Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) is to undertake a study into the causes of lamb mortality. The study, which is now underway, will monitor the activity of predators and the well-being and mortality of lambs in an area where a significant number of lambs have been lost in previous seasons. Last year crofters in the Gairloch peninsula reported that over 200 lambs had been lost between May and September and that they believed the majority had been killed by hungry Sea Eagles.

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Posted in Nature

John Muir – 171 today

The John Muir BirthplaceTrust is holding a series of events to mark the anniversary of John Muir’s birth, 171 years ago today. Born in Dunbar in 1838, Muir found fame as a passionate defender of wild land in the United States, but remains relatively unknown in Scotland. Muir moved to America as a child and following an extremely strict upbringing, he permanently lost his sight in one eye in an industrial accident and was totally blind for a period of time. After this traumatic event Muir became passionately interested in the outdoors and began to campaign quietly for its preservation.

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Posted in Uncategorized

Geo walk follows in Darwin’s footsteps

Lochaber Geopark is offering a chance to follow in the footsteps of Charles Darwin during a guided walk to the Parallel Roads in Glen Roy in June and July. The strange ridges on the hillsides of Glen Roy are thought to be the old shorelines of lochs whose water level changed dramatically due to an ice dam which may have been formed by a falling comet. Darwin, who was born 200 years ago, visited Glen Roy in 1838 and after spending 5 days exploring, described it as a, “most remarkable area”. Darwin came to the conclusion that the lines were

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Posted in News

Important archaeological find in Argyll

Archaeologists working at a National Trust for Scotland garden in Argyll have found evidence of a monastic settlement dating to the 7th – 9th century AD. The news comes as Crarae Garden prepares to unveil the results of a seven year refurbishment project on Thursday 9 April. As part of the refurbishment, archaeologists carried out important excavation work at the site, located 10 miles south of Inveraray. There was already evidence that Crarae has been a spiritual place for thousands of years – a Neolithic chambered cairn, Bronze Age burial mound and medieval church and graveyard are all nearby. The

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Posted in Nature

Gaelic podcasts for the Corbetts go live

Walkhighlands today launches a new series of Gaelic pronunciation podcasts covering the Corbetts, the Scottish mountains between 2500 and 3000 feet. Now all walkers can listen to a native Gaelic speaker giving the correct pronunciation of summits such as Meallan Liath Coire Mhic Dhughaill, as well as the meaning or origin of the name. The 221 recordings add to those already available for the Munros and many other routes available free on the website.

Posted in Walkhighlands news


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Walking can be dangerous and is done entirely at your own risk. Information is provided free of charge; it is each walker's responsibility to check it and navigate using a map and compass.