walkhighlands

Stay at home

Scotland is under national lockdown. People are asked to stay at home except for essential purposes.
Click for details


Monthly Archives: June 2015

Our pick: Mountain bothies

In Scotland, Bothies are a remarkable part of our outdoors’ culture. The word bothy can really mean any form of very basic accommodation, but to hillwalkers the term is usually applied to ‘open’ bothies – buildings which are left unlocked for anyone to use. This year is the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the Mountain Bothy Association, which was set up by outdoor enthusiasts Bernard and Betty Heath to try to save from ruin many of the uninhabited buildings in the wilder parts of Scotland, which had traditionally been used as dosses. Today the association maintains – entirely through

Read more ›

Posted in Features, Magazine, Our picks

Let the mystery be…

THE hills of Scotland have a long tradition of the supernatural, which is hardly surprising since the indigenous highlander, even to-day, tends to superstition, and the history of Gaeldom is splattered with tales of the second sight, the little people, and tales from beyond the grave. My one and only encounter with anything remotely resembling spectral things occurred in Glen Banchor near my home in Newtonmore. I had taken my dogs for a walk on a local hill on a day of mist and rain, and as we returned along a well-trodden hill path we could see the glen road

Read more ›

Posted in Features, Magazine

Our pick: 10 of the easier Munros

Height certainly isn’t everything (see our pick of Scotland’s Best Wee Hills), but there seems little doubt that many people find some extra motivation when the objective reaches over that magical 3000 feet height. Here is our pick from some of the Munros that may be suitable for people early in their hillwalking career. Note that no Munros are really easy – anyone going hillwalking needs to learn basic map-reading skills, including the use of a compass, carry appropriate clothing and pay attention to the weather forecast – take a look at our skills and safety section for more information.

Read more ›

Posted in Features, Magazine, Our picks

Trust wins award for Knoydart regeneration

Wild land charity the John Muir Trust has been recognised by the Scotland’s Finest Woods Awards for its work to regenerate the woodland on its Li and Coire Dhorrcail property on Knoydart. Aileen McLeod MSP, Minister for Environment, Climate Change and Land Reform, presented the ‘New Native Woods Award’ to Lester Standen, John Muir Trust property manager for Knoydart, at the Royal Highland Show on Friday 19 June. The Scotland’s Finest Woods Awards celebrate the contribution that woodlands make to the environment and economic prosperity of Scotland and showcase how woods contribute to the health and well-being of Scottish people.

Read more ›

Posted in Nature

Adventure is not enough

David Lintern reflects on time spent in Assynt One of the most intriguing things about a few days solo backpacking… or in this case packrafting… is the joining up of thoughts seemingly unconnected. The ebb and flow, a continuity of activity that connects the otherwise disparate. Thoughts rise and others fall, and because I’m constantly moving these thoughts are allowed the space to come and go. There is also the wakefulness that comes from immersion in the back country over hours that become days – a paying of attention to raindrops and their patterns on the loch, the waves of

Read more ›

Posted in Features, Magazine

Over 20 of Scotland’s Environmental Organisations Back the Beaver

A coalition of over 20 of Scotland’s environmental organisations including the National Trust and the RSPB, have written to Dr Aileen McLeod, Minister for Environment, Climate Change and Land Reform, calling for the Eurasian beaver to be fully reintroduced and recognised by the Scottish Government as a resident, native species in Scotland. The group’s action followed publication of the Scottish Natural Heritage Report which will inform Ministers making the decision on the future of beavers in Scotland. In addition, the collective calls for the building on the current wild populations in Mid Argyll and Tayside, and permission for further licensed

Read more ›

Posted in Nature

Decision on Scottish beavers due soon

The final report on the future of beavers in Scotland has been sent to the Scottish government, paving the way for a decision to be made on whether the existing colonies will be allowed to remain and expand. The ‘Beavers in Scotland’ report, published by Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) is one of the most thorough assessments ever done for a species reintroduction proposal. It provides a comprehensive summary of existing knowledge about the likely impact of beavers living in the wild in Scotland and options for their management, and sets out four scenarios for Scottish Ministers to consider. These range

Read more ›

Posted in Nature

A dustman named Dumbledor

The natural world, like the human world, is awash with celebrity. A lists, B lists and everything underneath. It’s entirely imposed upon it by us, of course, and for better or worse it tends to be how conservation works, with some animals and habitats being ‘causes célèbres’ and others being……well…..the opposite. On the one hand we have the animals that tabloid newspapers might describe as ‘sexy’. In Scotland that might be eagles, otters, red deer. The animals that seem to have their own publicity machine to grab headlines, get their images shared on Twitter and generate public interest with relative

Read more ›

Posted in Features, Magazine

Ramblers and MCofS call on public to oppose Loch Lomond camping ban

Ramblers Scotland and the Mountaineering Council of Scotland (MCofS) are urging the public to oppose the ban on wild camping proposed for large areas of the Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park. Last October, the National Park held a public consultation on proposals to introduce byelaws to ban camping in response to over-crowding and incidents of antisocial behaviour in the national park. Just over half of all respondents said they didn’t want this restriction to their rights. However the National Park wants to go ahead with this part of the proposals and has asked the Environment Minister, Aileen McLeod,

Read more ›

Posted in Access issues, News

National Lottery grant to tackle path erosion on iconic Scottish peaks

A project which brings together Scotland’s two National Park Authorities to address the serious threat of man-made erosion to paths across areas of outstanding natural beauty has been given a major boost with the Heritage Lottery Fund today announcing a grant of £3.26 million. Taking in iconic peaks such as Ben Lomond, Ben A’an, Beinn A Ghlo and Lochnagar, the Mountains and the People project will tackle some of the worst path erosion problems in Scotland by training young people and volunteers to care for the upland landscapes and habitats. The project will give 48 young people the opportunity to

Read more ›

Posted in Access issues, Nature, News


Share on 

Walking can be dangerous and is done entirely at your own risk. Information is provided free of charge; it is each walker's responsibility to check it and navigate using a map and compass.