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Monthly Archives: July 2015

Wild land protected as Allt Duine windfarm refused

One of Scotland’s most controversial proposed wind farms – on officially designated ‘wild land’ in the Monadhliath – has been rejected by Scottish Government ministers following a public enquiry and lengthy delays. Deputy First Minister John Swinney said: “The Scottish Government’s policy on wind farms strikes a careful balance between maximising Scotland’s huge green energy potential and protecting some of our most scenic landscape and wild areas. We have been clear that wind farms can only be built in the right places and Scottish Planning Policy sets out rigorous steps to ensure wind farms are sited appropriately and sensitively. “I

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Posted in Nature, News

Orienteering events to close Moray and Strathfarrar roads

The World Orienteering Championship’s and orienteering’s Scottish Six Days event will run at the same time from 31 July to 8 August and will involve some road closures including Glen Strathfarrar on Monday 3 August. The competitions will bring 450 athletes from 50 nations and more than 5,000 others, including club competitors and spectators. Day 2 of The Scottish 6 Days Orienteering event will be held on 3 August in Glen Strathfarrar. Although the Glen will still be open for those on foot or on a bicycle, no vehicle permits will be issued that day and its worth remembering that

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Posted in Access issues, News

Trail shoes – Group Test

I spent my early days running around the hills in trainers carrying a cheap rucksack with a nylon cagoule and a spare jumper in it. Before I knew it I was head to toe in technical gear, with big boots on and suffering frequent attacks of buyers remorse. These days when I’m packing to head out, my gear more closely resembles what I carried all those years ago, some call it going lightweight but I think simplicity is a better description. Footwear is a big part of that and trail shoes I find come with a freedom and adaptability attached

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Posted in Features, Footwear, Gear reviews, Magazine

Quinag footpath work starts

Local footpath repair company Mountains Made Accessible has begun work this week on a programme of repairs to the footpath that leads from the main saddle (the Bealach a’ Chornaidh) to the highest summit of Quinag. The mountain, which includes three Corbetts (over 2500 feet high), dramatic ridges and spectacular views, is one of the most popular in the north of Scotland, bringing vital cash into the Lochinver area However steady footfall combined with the mountain’s exposure to relentless Atlantic weather systems has begun to take its toll on the footpath. The work will be supervised by another Lochinver man,

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Posted in Nature, News

Gear review: Child carriers

If you want to get off the flat and up the hills with your wee one, a child carrier is called for. But which one? David Lintern and family take a look… The adage ‘try before you buy’ is never more true than with child carriers – they are relatively expensive, have differing features, and a relatively small window of use before your little one isn’t so little anymore – so you want to get it right. And a bit like rucksacks – even if you find a retailer that stocks a variety of these to compare them properly in

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Posted in Gear reviews, Magazine, Rucksacks

Chris Packham joins Rewilding Britain campaign

Chris Packham, the wildlife writer and TV presenter, has thrown his weight behind Rewilding Britain, a new independent charity that aims to restore nature and reintroduce missing species such as wild boar, bison, lynx, pelicans and eventually wolves and sperm whales. On a straight-talking blog published on the charity’s website he describes the current state-of-play as: “a noxious blend of ignorance, ludicrous antipathy and insidious vested interests”. Mr Packham, a zoology graduate, states the case for rewilding: “How much more of our natural heritage needs to be destroyed before we accept that in plain terms that conservation as we currently

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Posted in Nature

Dreaming of Assynt

SEVERAL nights ago when the temperature dropped to unusually low levels even for this poor summer I put some logs on the wood burning stove, poured myself a large dram and settled down to read. But it wasn’t a book I was reading – it was the brand new Harveys map of Assynt. This new 1:40,000 scale map had dropped through my letterbox a few days earlier and it covers what many would regard as one of the finest areas of wild land in Scotland. The poet Norman MacCaig was passionate in his love for this area – he claimed

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Posted in Features, Magazine

Loch Arkaig night time road closures in August

This August will see some disruption for walkers planning routes or bothy trips from Loch Arkaig as the road will be closed during the evening and night for the duration of the month. The 6pm to 6am closure is to allow contractors to carry out essential works relating to connecting the new hydro electric scheme. The closure will commence at the junction of the C1153, the Loch Arkaig road, travelling in a westerly direction for 2km to Achnasaul. The closure will start from Monday 3rd August 2015 until Friday 28th August 2015. The road will close each night at 6pm

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Posted in Access issues, News

Our pick: 12 of Scotland’s most fascinating caves

Caves are perhaps not the first landscape feature people associate with Scotland. Think high mountains, picturesque glens, rugged coastline and stunning sandy beaches – but caves? Here we list 12 of the most fascinating caves for walkers to visit. The Bone Caves, Inchnadamph, Sutherland The celebrated limestone Bone Caves were excavated in 1889 by the geologists Peach and Horne. They found the remains of now extinct animals which once roamed the Highlands including lynx, polar bear, arctic fox and lemmings. It is believed that the caves may have once sheltered both these animals and also the humans who hunted them.

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Posted in Features, Magazine, Our picks

Baby steps outdoors

an unofficial anti-guide to Irresponsible Parenting (part 1) If there’s one thing more tedious than a childfree friend extolling the virtues of their carbon neutral fun-and-money-filled lifestyle, it’s a self-satisfied parent extolling the worthiness of their child fulfilled life. There seems to be a whole lot of navel gazing surrounding the weird, wonderful world of sprogs, with both ‘sides’ convinced of how much better their life is with/without. Therefore, as a new-ish dad, and someone who considered himself least likely to ever spawn an ankle biter of his own, rest assured I’m going to avoid a ‘how to’ guide on

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Posted in Features, Magazine


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Walking can be dangerous and is done entirely at your own risk. Information is provided free of charge; it is each walker's responsibility to check it and navigate using a map and compass.