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Monthly Archives: June 2016

40 years on…

THIS summer I’m celebrating 40 years as an outdoor writer. I’m going to mark the occasion by taking a rafting trip through the Grand Canyon with my two sons, followed by a five week campervan and mountain walking trip with my long suffering wife to the hills of France and Spain. Then, all going well, it’ll be back on the training bike as I prepare for an autumn ride around the North of Scotland 500. In between I have to spend a few weeks working – I’ll be filming my second series of Roads Less Travelled for BBC Scotland –

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Posted in Features, Magazine

Navigation: A day to learn, a lifetime to master

Ever been lost on a hill? Last week, David Lintern found himself with Mountaineering Scotland. “I’d have thought you Walkhighlands guys would have your navigation all sorted, no?” said Steve, with a bit of a twinkle in his eye. We were walking in on the approach to Ben Donich, a popular Corbett above the Rest and Be Thankful, and our training ground for a one-day navigation course provided by the Mountaineering Scotland. Steve was only teasing, but he probably had a point. I do OK I suppose, but I can’t pretend for a minute I’ve got it licked. To be

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Posted in Features, Magazine

New Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Centre launched on Isle of Mull

A new marine wildlife visitor centre has been launched in Tobermory on the Isle of Mull by conservation charity Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust – to strengthen conservation action for whales, dolphins, and porpoises, and to develop the Hebrides’ appeal as a wildlife tourism hotspot. The Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Centre on Tobermory’s picturesque harbour front was formally opened this month, and will be a learning, training and volunteering hub, as well as providing a major attraction for visitors, including families and children. The building’s transformation has been funded as part of a grant of almost £220,000 from the UK

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Posted in Nature

I’ve found a fluffy wee chick. What should I do?

A couple of weeks ago my boss phoned just as I was packing up to leave work for the day. She’d received a report from a park visitor who had found an owl chick sitting on one of our mountain bike trails, and was phoning to see if I knew what the general advice was regarding owl chicks found out of their nests. But I didn’t know. My acquisition of wildlife factoids that assist me as a ranger has developed principally on a ‘learn as you go’ basis. Any knowledge that my fusty old brain manages to retain about a

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Posted in Features, Magazine, Nature

Scheme launched for hillwalkers’ to ‘Adopt a Path’ in our National Parks

An exciting new campaign encouraging people to help look after Scotland’s most iconic and popular mountains, has been launched today on Conic Hill in Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park. The ‘Adopt a Path’ campaign is part of a major £6.1 million project – The Mountains & The People – and is launched on its one year anniversary. ‘Adopt a Path’ asks volunteers who go hillwalking to adopt a favourite hill route in Scotland’s National Parks – Loch Lomond & The Trossachs and Cairngorms – that they will inspect when they go walking and then report back on the

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Posted in Access issues, Nature

MCofS warn walkers not to become too reliant on GPS

Navigation in the Scottish Mountains can be challenging; particularly if the cloud comes down and visibility is lost. This is a time when many hill walkers will pull out their GPS, press a few buttons and confidently follow instructions from the small screen in front of them. Heather Morning, Mountain Safety Advisor with The Mountaineering Council of Scotland, discusses whether that GPS ‘safety net’ is indeed the panacea to solving all our navigation and safety concerns or whether we as a hill walking community are becoming so reliant on modern technology that we may be actually losing a part of

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Posted in News

Iconic Highlands bothy reborn as eco-friendly rewilding base

An iconic but once derelict mountain bothy in Glen Affric has been transformed into an eco-friendly rewilding base by Trees for Life – creating the springboard for an ambitious 25-year programme of forest restoration which will extend Scotland’s Caledonian Forest towards the country’s west coast. Around 100 people gathered at the remote Athnamulloch Bothy – which lies west of Loch Affric, on the National Forest Estate managed by Forest Enterprise Scotland – on Sunday 29 May to celebrate the building’s £137,000 renovation, which has been funded by generous donations and grants. Broadcaster, writer and Trees for Life Patron Vanessa Collingridge

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Posted in Nature


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Walking can be dangerous and is done entirely at your own risk. Information is provided free of charge; it is each walker's responsibility to check it and navigate using a map and compass.