walkhighlands

Stay at home

Scotland is under national lockdown. People are asked to stay at home except for essential purposes.
Click for details


Monthly Archives: July 2017

Review: Mammut MTR 201-II Max Low Trail Shoe

Whilst these lightweight low-cut shoes are firmly aimed at trail runners – and ultra long distance ones at that – I’m always looking for comfortable and robust footwear that enables me to discard my heavier shoes and boots for summer Scottish routes. As with all footwear, fit is key. These were instantly very comfortable on my wide feet with no pinch points, the toe box is reasonably wide with plenty of give in the mesh uppers, they may be slightly on the short side as I fit a UK size 6 when a 5.5 is usually my choice (men’s version

Read more ›

Posted in Footwear, Gear reviews, Magazine

What Price a Bothy?

IT was a number of years ago now when my two sons had joined the Boy Scouts. I was asked to help organise an overnight expedition for the lads and since it was February I agreed to take them to Glen Feshie for an overnight in the popular bothy known as Ruigh-aiteachain. We kitted the boys out with headtorches and wandered down the snow covered footpath from Achlean. As soon as they picked out the grey walls of the bothy through the trees they made a run for it, all eager to find the best space to put down their

Read more ›

Posted in Features, Magazine, News

Highland estate limits access to famous “Whisky Trail”

Ramblers Scotland is calling on a Highland landowner to immediately remove new locked gates that are blocking public access to their estate, and the Speyside Way that runs through it. Three electronic gates were recently installed at the beautiful Kinrara Estate south of Aviemore – preventing walkers, cyclists and horse-riders from accessing the popular Speyside Way, also known as ‘The Whisky Trail’. Under Scottish law, there is an obligation on people who own and manage land to ensure that public access is facilitated where access rights apply. Thousands of people use the Speyside Way each year, bringing many economic benefits

Read more ›

Posted in Access issues

Hill skills and Camp Craft – Being prepared

David Lintern looks at 5 ways to be better prepared in the hills. There’s something to be said for thinking about how much we’re hauling up those hills, on our backs, bellies or feet. The phrase ultralight may come and go, but it’s not all marketing. More interesting for me is one of the tenets of going lightweight; abstraction. What items have a shared use? What can I do without altogether, and what constitutes cutting it too fine? What knowledge I can carry, instead of kit, which makes my outdoors life simpler, safer and more enjoyable? I rarely think about

Read more ›

Posted in News

JMT seeks Engagement Officer for Sandwood Bay

Conservation charity, the John Muir Trust is seeking to recruit someone to improve the visitor experience and level of engagement of visitors and locals with Sandwood Bay. The Trust says it is looking for an excellent communicator with experience of working with communities, volunteers and young people and contract management experience. The main responsibilities of the 18 month contract will be to plan and deliver; a promotion and marketing programme for local business in relation to the bay and the North Coast 500; a training programme for students, volunteers, schools and visitors, and a refurbishment programme for the Sandwood Bay

Read more ›

Posted in News

Corran Ferry grounded for ‘forseeable future’

The Highland Council-run Corran Ferry service across Loch Linnhe has been suspended since the boat struck rocks on Saturday. The council has said it is looking to ‘find a solution’ but that the ferry is suspended for the ‘forseeable future’ according to the BBC. The back up boat – the Mail of Coul – is also unavailable, currently moored on Bute awaiting a repair. The ferry offers the fastest access from the south Ardgour, Morvern and the Ardnamurchan peninsula – popular tourism destinations currently at the height of their season – as well as for local residents and businesses. Update:

Read more ›

Posted in Access issues

New poll shows importance of wild places to Scottish tourism

New research released by one of the UK’s leading conservation charities has highlighted the potential benefits for Scotland’s tourism industry of protecting the country’s unique Wild Land Areas from industrial-scale development. A survey carried out by YouGov on behalf of the John Muir Trust reveals that the majority of Scottish adults – 55 per cent – are “less likely” to visit scenic areas in Scotland if they contain large scale infrastructure, like commercial wind farms, electricity transmission and super-quarries. Just three per cent said they were “more likely” to visit such areas, while 26 per cent said that the existence

Read more ›

Posted in Nature

Our Pick: walks from the Snow Roads

The Snow Roads is a 90 mile scenic route from Blairgowrie in Perthshire to Grantown-on-Spey in the Highlands. It includes the highest public road in Britain as well as several other passes which may be familiar through their regular mentions in winter traffic reports – as this is the snowiest part of the UK. The Snow Roads can be used as a superb touring route in its own right, or as an approach to the incredibly popular NC500 route around the northern Highlands. Although the distance means that the Snow Roads can easily be driven in a day, to do

Read more ›

Posted in Magazine, Our picks

Threat to new beaver family in the Highlands of Scotland

A family of beavers found living on a river in the Beauly area in the Scottish Highlands are to be trapped and put into captivity following a decision by Scottish Government Ministers. Trees for Life, the charity which discovered the group, says the family should either stay where they are or be relocated locally. Film from camera traps set by the conservation experts from the charity in mid-June clearly show the presence of a mother and at least two young kits swimming and playing with their mum. Trees for Life shared news of the discovery with Scottish Natural Heritage and

Read more ›

Posted in Nature

Has this been a bad year for hay fever?

Of all the traumas that summer inflicts upon a pale, midge-and-tick-attracting ginger who is forced to skulk around in the shadows for months on end, hay fever is by far the worst. But while I’ve had my fair share of horrendous seasons in the 38 years since I was diagnosed I can’t remember experiencing anything quite like I’ve experienced this year. Is it just me or is 2017 a really bad year for hay fever? Given the individual nature of the condition I’m well aware that my own experience might not be representative, so I’ve resorted to one of my

Read more ›

Posted in Features, Magazine


Share on 

Walking can be dangerous and is done entirely at your own risk. Information is provided free of charge; it is each walker's responsibility to check it and navigate using a map and compass.