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Monthly Archives: May 2018

The Mountains Are Calling

IT seems that I meet more fell runners than walkers in the hills these days. The old safety cliches about not going hillwalking without waterproofs, spare hats and mitts, a warm drink and stout boots don’t appear to affect these mountain athletes. Dressed in shorts and t-shirt, perhaps with a miniscule pack or a skimpy lightweight waterproof tied round the waist these guys and gals seem impervious to the cold and wet as they bound down the hillside with little obvious effect on hips and knees. How I envy them. When I was younger I ran a bit in the

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Posted in Features, Magazine

Walkhighlands and your privacy

You can’t help but have noticed that the laws around the way that companies and websites deal with your privacy are changing this month, on 25th May. You may have had many emails asking you to ‘resubscribe’ to email newsletters and the like, or you will no longer be contacted by the company in question. Some companies have in the past added people to email newsletter lists without their confirmed consent. At Walkhighlands everyone who receives our newsletter does so as a member benefit and has not only signed up as a member, but also clicked on an email sent

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Posted in News, Walkhighlands news

The Winter Without End: A Review

Mid May would normally seem a late time of year to reminisce about the winter we’ve just enjoyed/endured (delete as appropriate), but it was only a few weeks ago that my road was blocked by 3ft snowdrifts. That’s lovely for someone like me, who feels most alive in the coldest months of the year, but I realise not everybody shares my affliction. I therefore thought I’d best play it safe and wait till the public mood had been mellowed by the first narcotic aromas of grass cuttings and charred burgers before unleashing nostalgic photos of ice and blizzards onto an

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Posted in Features, Magazine

Scotland in Miniature

With its rugged mountains, lush glens and windswept islands, Scotland is a utopia for nature lovers and outdoor enthusiasts. Despite my background in geography, I have little desire to venture overseas as my constant thirst for landscape photography, coastal walking, island hopping, cycling and camping is quenched within these shores. Scotland has over 790 islands scattered around its 10,250 mile (16,500 kilometre) coastline, but only one of these has acquired the nickname ‘Scotland in Miniature’; the Isle of Arran. My family photograph albums reveal that my childhood had a fairly ordinary start, with a week-long Scottish self-catering holiday once a

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Posted in Features, Magazine

Review: Osprey Hikelite 26

RRP: £80 Weight: 0.73kg This is a 26 litre unisex day pack, part of Osprey’s 2018 range that also includes an 18 litre version. Osprey describe it as a pared-down pack; as someone who feels their packs tend to have too many features, complicated closing mechanisms etc this can only be a good thing. I’ve been testing this pack over the last few months on lower level and shorter walks where full winter gear hasn’t been necessary. The main feature is the ventilated back where the actual pack is kept away from your back by a taut mesh tensioned on

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Posted in Gear reviews, Magazine, Rucksacks

Glenlude – A place for people

David Lintern builds the right kind of border wall – a dry stone dyke in the Borders. “I like it here, it has a nice feel. And it’s great that it’s local to me”, says Ellen. With nothing more to add, we slurp our tea in silent agreement as waterproofs steam gently near the stove. We’re in a hut on the edge of a wood a few miles outside Peebles, and we are dirty, damp, tired and happy. The previous day, I joined Emily, Sandy, Hugh and Ellen to get hands on with drystone walling. Under the guidance of Neil

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Posted in Features, Magazine

Gear review: Patagonia Better Sweater

Recommended Price: £80 Weight: 499g The Patagonia Better Sweater is a fleece whose outer fabric is woven into a sweater-knit face, making this a garment that looks smart both on the hill and off it, and avoids the unsightly pilling that affects many alternatives after a few washes. The interior is more obviously traditionally fleecy, and wicks moisture well. Although it’s really a warm mid-layer – and it works well under a waterproof shell in cold conditions – it’s great to wear as an outer layer on dry days too. I’ve found that its both a little warmer and more

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Posted in Gear reviews, Jackets

How 83 year old Sheila Hancock conquered Suilven

Film director Simon Hunter describes filming on the mountain of Suilven in Scotland’s northwest Highlands. EDIE tells the story of an elderly lady played by Sheila Hancock who after a bitter and miserable life decides to release herself from a unfulfilled life by heading off to Scotland to climb a mountain and rekindle some of the magic of her youth. Picking a mountain was always the easiest part of Edie for me. Like the character of Jonny who helps and trains Edie to regain her confidence for days and nights in the wild, I used to row across Loch Fionn

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Posted in Features

Airlifts on Suilven for second phase of path repairs

This week from Monday 7 May, community-owned Suilven in Sutherland will be at the centre of four days of helicopter activity to carry hundreds of tonnes of stone and gravel to the high slopes. The airlifts mark the start of a new phase of repair work on the path from Glencanisp, which will carry on through the summer, with the £200,000 project expected to be completed in August. The mountain is bracing itself for an upsurge in visitors following the release later this month of the film ‘Edie’, starring Sheila Hancock as an octogenarian who makes a life-changing decision to

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Posted in Access issues, Nature, News

Don’t slip up this bank holiday

As the May Bank Holiday approaches, hill walkers are being urged to treat long-lying snow patches with caution. Although it’s spring on lower ground, the high mountains of Scotland are still hanging onto winter, and there are still substantial snowfields and snow patches lying across the routes up many popular hills. Temperatures over the last week having been unseasonably low, with new snow falling on some of the higher mountain tops, and much of the old snow people encounter may be hard and icy, posing a significant threat to anyone not properly equipped. Heather Morning Mountain Safety Advisor with Mountaineering

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Posted in News


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Walking can be dangerous and is done entirely at your own risk. Information is provided free of charge; it is each walker's responsibility to check it and navigate using a map and compass.