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Camping

Tent Pegs

In the quest for the lightest possible weight, backpacking tent manufacturers often supply extremely minimalist pegs. They’re fine on a still, beautifully manicured campsite, but in a wild camping situation they can often be found lacking. And certain terrain such

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Posted in Camping, Gear reviews

Kovea Spider stove

Kovea have been making stoves for a number of other companies for years, but this year sees the introduction of the Kovea brand onto the UK market for the first time. We spent some time with the Spider stove, a

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Posted in Camping, Gear reviews

Three Season Sleeping Bags

While it’s a convenient categorisation there’s no doubt that the traditional seasonal sleeping bag rating system (where sleeping bags are designated one, two, three, four or even five season) is highly subjective, and the introduction of the standardised EN13537  testing

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Posted in Camping, Gear reviews

Bivvy Bags

Often regarded the preserve of climbers perched on inaccessible rocky ledges or soldiers hidden in the bushes, in the right conditions the bivvy (bivi, bivvi or bivouac) bag can add a whole new level of enjoyment to an overnight camp.

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Posted in Camping, Gear reviews

Canister-mounted Stoves

Simple, clean, lightweight and efficient, the canister-mounted stove is justifiably popular. Most stoves in this category are simply a burner head with pot supports that screws on to the top of a pressurised canister containing a blend of propane, butane

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Posted in Camping, Gear reviews

Pots and Pans for backpacking

Your cookware setup will be dictated by a number of factors – if you’re car-camping there’s little to stop you bringing a range of pots and pans and a twin-burner gas stove (and steak). If you’re backpacking you may think

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Posted in Camping, Gear reviews




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Walking can be dangerous and is done entirely at your own risk. Information is provided free of charge; it is each walker's responsibility to check it and navigate using a map and compass.