walkhighlands



Camping

Bivvy Bags

Often regarded the preserve of climbers perched on inaccessible rocky ledges or soldiers hidden in the bushes, in the right conditions the bivvy (bivi, bivvi or bivouac) bag can add a whole new level of enjoyment to an overnight camp. They’re basically a waterproof cover for a sleeping bag, ideally made from a breathable fabric to reduce condensation build-up within, and sometimes fitted with a zip to make access easier. Combined with a sleeping bag and a ground mat (placed within the bivvy bag or left outside) the small footprint makes it possible to sleep in places where a tent

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Posted in Camping, Gear reviews

Canister-mounted Stoves

Simple, clean, lightweight and efficient, the canister-mounted stove is justifiably popular. Most stoves in this category are simply a burner head with pot supports that screws on to the top of a pressurised canister containing a blend of propane, butane and/or isobutane. Simply open the valve and light. No priming, no smelly fuel and it’ll all fit into your cooking pot for transport. What’s not to like? Well – as the gas is in a liquid state in the canister it can be a struggle to get any gas out of the canister in cold weather, so a liquid fuel

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Posted in Camping, Gear reviews

Pots and Pans for backpacking

Your cookware setup will be dictated by a number of factors – if you’re car-camping there’s little to stop you bringing a range of pots and pans and a twin-burner gas stove (and steak). If you’re backpacking you may think differently. My personal backpacking set-up is limited to a single pot with a capacity in the range of 900ml to 1400ml for non-winter use, perhaps stretching up to 2000ml pot when I envisage melting a lot of snow. It’s important to consider the number of people eating too – being able to boil enough water for two people in one

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Posted in Camping, Gear reviews

Gear Review: Backpacking Tents for Two

The mainstay of the backpacking tent market, a two-person model is the ideal combination of living space and weight for the backpacker that wants one tent for use (almost) all year round. As a plus-six-footer most one-person tents are too small for me, even if they have a long enough living area my feet invariably end up touching a sloping wall. A two-person tent may not be much longer, but the extra width allows me to sleep diagonally, or even share with a close (and smaller) friend. Of course, if carrying a two-person tent alone it can’t be too heavy,

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Posted in Camping, Gear reviews

Gear Review Extra: Multi-fuel Stoves

This is going to get a little geeky, so take a look at my recent sock review if you don’t get excited about this kind of thing. For those that do – read on and confess all in the forum – it’s a safe place. I reckon that the new breed of stove that can take isobutane/propane gas canisters as well as liquid fuels such as white gas could change the way backpackers view stoves forever. Liquid fuel stoves were once the preserve of mountaineers and explorers that operate in very cold temperatures, where normal isobutane/propane gas canisters cease to be efficient,

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Posted in Camping, Gear reviews


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