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Monthly Archives: October 2016

Our picks: Autumn Scotland

It’s autumn, and the glens are quiet – or would be, were it not for the roaring stags. The leaves are turning and the midges are gone; is there a better time to get out and about in Scotland’s countryside?

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Posted in Magazine, Our picks

The State of Nature and the Sixth Great Extinction

On 14th September the national TV stations, airwaves and social media were buzzing, obsessed with just one massive headline. The story had broken two days earlier but every subsequent day brought new earth-shaking revelations that required still more analysis and

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Posted in Conservation, Magazine

Paddling the Scottish Everglades

David Lintern makes an amphibious journey to the wild woods of Knapdale, on the trail of a real amphibian – the Eurasian beaver. We arrived late and set up our not so stealthy camp in the dark, a little too

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Posted in Conservation, Magazine


Steall Gorge footpath to remain closed till end October

Following a significant rockfall at Steall Gorge in Glen Nevis in mid-September, the popular path leading to Steall Falls will remain closed until the end of October. Fort William based Thistle Access will start work on Monday 10 October to

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Posted in Access issues, Walking News

£2.85m Heritage Lottery boost helps communities get closer to nature

Communities in the Cairngorms and Skye are celebrating major National Lottery investment which will see large areas of landscape along with many historic and natural attractions rejuvenated, celebrated and protected. Thanks to a major grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund,

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Posted in Access issues, Walking News



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