walkhighlands

Monthly Archives: July 2017

New poll shows importance of wild places to Scottish tourism

New research released by one of the UK’s leading conservation charities has highlighted the potential benefits for Scotland’s tourism industry of protecting the country’s unique Wild Land Areas from industrial-scale development. A survey carried out by YouGov on behalf of

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Posted in Conservation

Our Pick: walks from the Snow Roads

The Snow Roads is a 90 mile scenic route from Blairgowrie in Perthshire to Grantown-on-Spey in the Highlands. It includes the highest public road in Britain as well as several other passes which may be familiar through their regular mentions

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Posted in Magazine, Our picks

Threat to new beaver family in the Highlands of Scotland

A family of beavers found living on a river in the Beauly area in the Scottish Highlands are to be trapped and put into captivity following a decision by Scottish Government Ministers. Trees for Life, the charity which discovered the

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Posted in Conservation

Has this been a bad year for hay fever?

Of all the traumas that summer inflicts upon a pale, midge-and-tick-attracting ginger who is forced to skulk around in the shadows for months on end, hay fever is by far the worst. But while I’ve had my fair share of

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Posted in Magazine

Review: Mammut Runbold Trail SO Hooded Jacket Womens

RRP: £110 Weight: 365g This softshell from Mammut comes midway on the spectrum of these jackets that fill in the gap between seam-sealed waterproof hardshells and super-light windshirts. The Rab Runbold Trail SO is made from Mammut’s SOFtech fabric which

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Posted in Gear reviews, Jackets, Magazine



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