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Monthly Archives: March 2019

Our pick: Scotland’s best wee hills

Sometimes you don’t have the energy or time to slog your way up one of the great iconic giants of the Highlands. Some of Scotland’s best-loved hills are the smaller peaks, often more accessible, full of character and offering equally

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Posted in Magazine, Our picks

Monarch or Menace?

Scotland’s largest land mammal is also one of its most contentious. Photographer and Director of SCOTLAND: The Big Picture, Peter Cairns, explores the ecological and cultural divide over the Monarch of the Glen.

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Posted in Conservation, Magazine, Photography

Scottish Nature Photographer of the Year winners announced

A summer spent focusing on a single subject has secured the title of Scottish Nature Photographer of the Year 2018 for Edinburgh photographer Phil Johnston. Phil’s winning image Roe Kid Flower was captured during the summer of 2018 while he

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Posted in Magazine, Photography

Skills for the Hills this Spring

Mountaineering Scotland announce a series of evenings in April to brush up your hillwalking skills.

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Posted in Magazine, Walking News

Out of the woods

Finding peace and mental renewal on a mindful walk in the woods.

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Posted in Magazine

Blow for wild land as Glen Etive hydro schemes approved again by council

There was disappointment for outdoors enthusiasts and Highlands tourism businesses as a full meeting of Highland Council approved all the Glen Etive hydro schemes for a second time this afternoon. The three schemes situated on officially-recognised Wild Land were approved

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Posted in Walking News



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