walkhighlands

Monthly Archives: July 2019

Watching otters in Scotland

An encounter with an otter in the wild is a magical experience. Helen Webster takes a look at the best places to spot otters, how to boost your chances of a sighting, and tips to avoid disturbing these amazing creatures.

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Posted in Our picks, Photography

Gear review: Rab Flashpoint 2 Jacket

Recommended Price: £220Weight: 185g (large) The Flashpoint 2 is a truly ultralight waterproof jacket. Weighing in at just 185g in men’s size large, the jacket squashes into a tiny stuff sack and is barely noticeable in your pack; runners could

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Posted in Gear reviews, Jackets, Magazine

Fires – a burning issue

With photos of campfire rings and damage left in the pinewoods circulating on social media, Adam Streeter-Smith, Access Officer for the Cairngorms National Park authority, takes on a hot topic, asking just what is responsible behaviour. Picture the scene –

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Posted in Access issues, Conservation, Magazine

Gear Review: Sprayway Women’s Escape Shorts

Recommend Price: £50Weight: 175g (size 10) In recent years shorts seems to have morphed into either teeny weeny very short shorts or baggy knee length mountain biker style shorts. These Escape shorts from Sprayway are from the traditional, easy-fit school

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Posted in Gear reviews, Trousers

Gear Review: Salomon Outline GTX women’s hiking shoe

RRP: £115 (currently on offer with some retailers)Weight: 280 grams per shoe (UK size 6) For summer walking I always prefer to wear lightweight boots or shoes if conditions are dry enough. This year those days have been few and

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Posted in Footwear, Gear reviews

Gear review: Mammut hiking pants

Recommended Price: £79Weight: 230g (32″) Allegedly we’re now in the middle of summer, the ideal time of year for this pair of lightweight walking trousers from Mammut. The fit is athletic, but the stretchy material (94% Polyamide, 6% Elastane) and

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Posted in Gear reviews, Trousers




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Walking can be dangerous and is done entirely at your own risk. Information is provided free of charge; it is each walker's responsibility to check it and navigate using a map and compass.